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danish

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For some time I've been working through the oak left over from the kitchen installation people. I build this chest of drawers a few weeks ago, and today I put this neat little cupboard/cabinet together. It's around 55x50x40 and it's meant to hide all the ugly cables under the desk.

2021-01-27 22.59.58.jpg


I've always used danish oil, but today I tried my luck with Osmo's graphite and I like how it turned out.

2021-01-27 23.00.21.jpg

I added some small rubber wheels to it and it's rolling nicely.
I am very new to wood working and it was my first time trying to install a hinge, and this was way harder than I thought it would be. I went for these ones from Hafele - and while I haven't got a lot of experience, I do not think I'd recommend them to anyone else.

Also, the door is basically made of two x 5cm wide boards with a bunch of sticks inserted to them. I do not have a proper routing table or a dado stack for the table saw, so this was absolutely super duper hard. I ended up numbering each and every inset to match them with single cut sticks. And even then I got most of them wrong.

2021-01-27 23.00.43.jpg


On that note, I am using a 12 year old SIP 10' table saw from Ebay. I love it, but does anyone here know if it's possible to fit a dado stack to it? It's not, right?

All in all I am happy with it though, and I learned a lot from this project.
I have two long planks of wood left, I think my next project will be a daybed. :)

EDIT: I just did a search here for the dado stack point above, and it seems there are plenty of discussions on the subject :)
 
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greenfingers2

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Morning Guys - now well into retirement and never been a woodworker but really enjoy reading this forum, and seeing the wonderful work by all the experts. In a moment of "lockdown madness" decided to buy myself a hobby bandsaw (something I've never used before) and play around in my garage. Read and took note of all the safety procedures and took my first tentative steps. Now I hope all you professionals will try not to smile but here's my first efforts. There is supposed to be a third baby elephant but the curves looked far too tight to me, probably would be O K in expert hands.
 

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jcassidy

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Basic tool rack, inspired by something I saw on Popular Woodworking. Largely for practise of square cross-cuts, truing, smoothing and squaring some rough-sawn, warped, and poor quality, pallet wood.

Next version will feature haunched rabbits on both upgrights (instead of only one!) and mortice & tenon joinery, instead of screws. Will also sharpen up and use some of the old wooden beading planes I got from somewhere. I'll still be using crappy pallet wood until I'm sure I've blown off most of the cobwebs. Also because I quite like the live edge on some of the boards.

It's surprising what long-buried skills resurface once you get going...

IMG_20210128_235029.jpg
 

jcassidy

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Basic tool rack, inspired by something I saw on Popular Woodworking. Largely for practise of square cross-cuts, truing, smoothing and squaring some rough-sawn, warped, and poor quality, pallet wood.
Missus suggested a shelf, and I turned some pegs with a poor mans lathe, i.e. drilla and rough sandpaper!
 

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Essex Barn Workshop

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Not my most elegant build, but most recent. My first french cleat system

1612006492845.png


used to hold my 6' sandpaper discs. The lettering is thin masking tape. The bottom row were all made from bits of scrap, hence the different sizes, the top row from a piece of scrap MDF so a bit more uniform!

1612006587312.png
 

Jameshow

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Not my most elegant build, but most recent. My first french cleat system

View attachment 102194

used to hold my 6' sandpaper discs. The lettering is thin masking tape. The bottom row were all made from bits of scrap, hence the different sizes, the top row from a piece of scrap MDF so a bit more uniform!

View attachment 102195
Nice

I think you should spray paint those numbers and peal off the tape!

Cheers James
 

Dr Al

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I'm not sure what I planned to make today, but it certainly wasn't this...

Today I made some bookmarks:

1612022155404.png


There's a bit of a back story to these (although it's probably not very interesting!) A year or two ago when we were emptying out my father-in-law's house & sheds, we came across four lumps of wood coated in something like creosote. We weren't sure what they were but I couldn't bring myself to chuck them out so I brought them home. Here's two of them:

1612022166753.png


Having taken a hand-plane to the top surface of one of them, I realised it's actually quite nice wood:

1612022172090.png


I posted some pictures (with sapele, oak, iroku & red oak next to the wood for reference) on another thread and the consensus was that it's greenheart.

Anyway, today I was slicing one of the blocks up into a few pieces and went a bit awry with the hand saw so one of the pieces was a lot thinner than planned (and rather tapered across the width :oops:). Following a conversation on another forum, I thought I'd do an experiment and see how thin I could successfully machine a bit of wood using my thicknesser (someone had commented that they wouldn't dare go down as low as 2 mm).

I passed the thin piece through the thicknesser (taped down to a sled) over and over again until the first time bits started to chip away. This is what it looked like then: you can see where it's started to chip out on the right and where there's a hole in the top-left.

1612022269118.png


I measured the thickness all the way round the edge and it's between 0.5 mm and 0.6 mm (I guess my thicknesser doesn't cut quite square).

I didn't really have anything to do with this thin piece, so I thought I'd cut it up into bookmark shaped pieces, treat with a couple of coats of Danish Oil (the photo at the top is after the first coat) and then my other half and her two siblings can have one each (since the wood came from their late father's shed, it seemed to me to be a nice gesture).
 

jcassidy

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A year or two ago when we were emptying out my father-in-law's house & sheds, we came across four lumps of wood coated in something like creosote.
How did you get the smell out? I came across some sort of electrical test harness made of lovely hardwood (mahogany or something) from an old engineers office, but it's just stinking of decades of oil permeated into it, no matter how much I plane off the surface...
thanks
John C.
 

Dr Al

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How did you get the smell out? I came across some sort of electrical test harness made of lovely hardwood (mahogany or something) from an old engineers office, but it's just stinking of decades of oil permeated into it, no matter how much I plane off the surface...
thanks
John C.
It didn't smell particularly strongly even before I planed it. Afterwards, it smells like wood to me. Maybe I was just lucky with whatever the coating is.
 

Dr Al

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I'm not sure what I planned to make today, but it certainly wasn't this...

Today I made some bookmarks:

View attachment 102213
I decided to make some more today out of European Walnut (using a table saw to do the first cut rather than a hand saw). Thicknesser took the material down to 0.8 mm without any tear-out and I figured that would do:

1612095046715.png
 

NickVanBeest

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I decided to make some more today out of European Walnut (using a table saw to do the first cut rather than a hand saw). Thicknesser took the material down to 0.8 mm without any tear-out and I figured that would do:
What thicknesser do you use?
 

D_W

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are you gonna put up a vid @DW
I did before, but I will admit it's no good and I need to re-do it. I didn't show the hammering as I was afraid of criticism from safety nazis, but since then, I've had no incidents with hot flying metal and covering up in full leathers with heavy hands would make hammering these little thin things difficult.

Paring chisels out of water hardening steel (like files) are kind of difficult - they can warp two ways, and you can lose one or two per half dozen straightening them after quench and temper -I lost one of the three above. I have a feeling that in factories, they left the bevels small and cut them on a high speed wet wheel. I have no such option and like to file to shape.

At any rate, I'll do a higher quality video at some point.

There are steels that would be easy to use for this (like A2), but I don't like most of them and will trouble through the warping, etc.
 

Droogs

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i was wondering about them ending up looking like Katanas due to the metal as you quenched them
 

Nelly111s

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A lady came into the workshop a short while ago with a garden trowel which has sentimental value and asked me to make a new handle for it. I think the old one was beech. New one is olive.

UKW _DSC_8864.jpg


New Handle

UKW _DSC_8866.jpg


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Other side of new handle

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Old handle, split with a chisel (didn't take much).

I hope the lady in question likes it when she picks it up.

Neil
 
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