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Orraloon

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18 Oct 2016
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Blue mountains Australia
It's taking shape and should look great when finished.
I made one about 14 years ago after looking around to buy an old one to do up but found nothing to suit. Was a bit nervous to start as its not something you do often but after getting into it found it not difficult at all. Two uprights with a shelf on top then decorate as much or little as you like. Being an old fashioned bloke I reckon a fireplace does not look right without one.
Regards
John
 

dgethin

New member
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24 Jan 2018
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Staffordshire
43 minutes ago


dgethin, wouldn't mind a photo or two of the lathe? I'm nearly there with parts for mine, but always open to experience from those 'who have gone before'? Pretty please?

Sam
775E329C-116F-4250-94FC-48142EB26444.jpeg
 

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Dr Al

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UKW Supporter
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11 May 2020
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Location
Dursley, Gloucestershire
Made myself an oak (ridiculous I know, but it's what I've got) back-to-front overdesigned bench hook:

1610125205553.png


The right-hand end is use with backless Japanese (pull) saws - either in the slot, which is the width of my Japanese saw's kerf or on the end (which has magnets glued into it to keep the saw running true):

1610125252893.png


The other end also has magnets set into it but has a slightly lower top: this can be used (with the jig the other way round) with a western saw. The relieved end is to account for the back of the western tenon saw.

The T-track in the top allows me to use a stop if I want to cut multiple pieces to the same length. Probably a bit pointless; I installed the T-track as an easy way to hang it underneath my bench so it's immediately available and figured while I was at it I'd make a stop.

As with my shooting board, the "cleat/hook" on the bottom isn't actually a cleat, it's four 20 mm dowels:

1610125266081.png


Three of them go in the jaws of the vice under normal use (the vice doesn't have to be tightened) so the moving jaw of the vice counters the pulling action of the saw. Using dowels means I can put it in a different place (or turn through 90°) if I want by putting the dowels into the dog holes on the bench.
 

Kev

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Joined
12 Nov 2004
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Location
Kent
Only got a couple of photos and needs a lampshade (of shops ever open again!) but thought would chip in so to speak. This was one of those side distractions that probably took far to long but became quite enjoyable and therapeutic to do. Will leave you all to spot the woods used.
IMG_20201209_200855.jpg
IMG_20201209_200859.jpg
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
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Location
Edinburgh
I made this segmented vase on my homemade lathe
This is very nicely done , though I think I have been watching too much news as I read that as I made this sectioned vase with a homicidal waif.

i need my bed
 

G S Haydon

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24 Apr 2013
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Very basic but fun use of scraps. Pipe box and drawer closely based on a version shown in a book on American pine furniture.

Hand tools aside from the timber prep.

Wood is meranti from an old door cill.

Oil finish.
 

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Fidget

Trying
Joined
29 May 2017
Messages
140
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Location
South Oxfordshire
I thought that I would try and make this Step Stool.


A: because I want one and B: to try and refine my skills (ha!).

The only problem was that I didn’t have quite enough walnut to complete the project, so I had to use what was available in my workshop which turned out to be some C24 10x2.

Any way this is what I ended up with. I split the C24 on my bandsaw and let it acclimatise in my workshop for about 10 minutes and the rest was done using only hand tools apart from the cut out in the legs. I’m quite pleased with it. It does the job, but some of the mortices are a bit messy, hopefully I’ve learned something along the way

20210109_122047.jpg20210109_122516.jpg
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
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Location
Aberdeen
I thought that I would try and make this Step Stool.


A: because I want one and B: to try and refine my skills (ha!).

The only problem was that I didn’t have quite enough walnut to complete the project, so I had to use what was available in my workshop which turned out to be some C24 10x2.

Any way this is what I ended up with. I split the C24 on my bandsaw and let it acclimatise in my workshop for about 10 minutes and the rest was done using only hand tools apart from the cut out in the legs. I’m quite pleased with it. It does the job, but some of the mortices are a bit messy, hopefully I’ve learned something along the way

View attachment 100599View attachment 100600
Looks good. I find soft woods like pine etc the most difficult to get crisp sharp joinery on. So whilst it’s cheap and close to hand it’s a real challenge to get a great level of finish.

Fitz.
 

Richard Berry

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5 Jan 2021
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Location
County Kildare, Ireland
I thought that I would try and make this Step Stool.


A: because I want one and B: to try and refine my skills (ha!).

The only problem was that I didn’t have quite enough walnut to complete the project, so I had to use what was available in my workshop which turned out to be some C24 10x2.

Any way this is what I ended up with. I split the C24 on my bandsaw and let it acclimatise in my workshop for about 10 minutes and the rest was done using only hand tools apart from the cut out in the legs. I’m quite pleased with it. It does the job, but some of the mortices are a bit messy, hopefully I’ve learned something along the way
Wedged tenons for the win! They always look smart. Nice work.
 

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