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Cabinetman

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Hi Heath, looks competently done, I’m just concerned that it’s not fastened down in anyway and with that porch it could blow over/away in a gale. And I’m just curious what the little door is for. Ian
 

PaulArthur

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Right then. This is my second ever piece of furniture - two and a half hard weeks for meet a deadline. Pretty pleased with it -
Glad to be having a week or two off. Is though!
For the top I cut veneers using a band saw, and then the bottom and sides are standard veneers, all with chunky solid lipping. The base is solid. Very heavy, and hopefully child-resistant!
 

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Cabinetman

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For only your second piece of furniture this is extremely impressive!
I’m curious about the drawer or is it drawers in one shot you’ve got the drawers level and then the left-hand drawer goes in further, is it one of those that goes right through the cabinet so you can get to it from either side?
And you have quite a gap between the drawer sides and the carcass, is there a runner in there of some sort? Ian
 

custard

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This is my second ever piece of furniture....For the top I cut veneers using a band saw
That is a simply astonishing achievement. I could see how a beginner might just scrape through with the carcass, but to handle relatively large, saw cut veneers like that is just amazing. How did you joint the veneers together into that "sun-ray" pattern, and how did you bond it to the substrate?
 

PaulArthur

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For only your second piece of furniture this is extremely impressive!
I’m curious about the drawer or is it drawers in one shot you’ve got the drawers level and then the left-hand drawer goes in further, is it one of those that goes right through the cabinet so you can get to it from either side?
And you have quite a gap between the drawer sides and the carcass, is there a runner in there of some sort? Ian
There’s one drawer that fills the whole of the left hand side of the carcass, and the right hand side is empty, with a sliding front that opens in front of the drawer on the left. There is a Blum runner on the drawer, to allow me to push the drawer front to get it to bounce back open, as I didn’t have any clearance to put a handle on the drawer front because of the sliding front that crosses it.

Does that make sense?
 

PaulArthur

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That is a simply astonishing achievement. I could see how a beginner might just scrape through with the carcass, but to handle relatively large, saw cut veneers like that is just amazing. How did you joint the veneers together into that "sun-ray" pattern, and how did you bond it to the substrate?
Thank you - it was a lot of work, but I’m really happy with it!
I cut the veneers myself using a big band saw at the local woodworking college - I go there once a week for some supervised workshop time. I then cut them roughly to size using a jig saw, and then got them exact by running a router along the edges, using a straight edge and a bearing guided trim bit. I glued them to the substrate (30mm MRMDF) using a bag press that I found on Facebook marketplace, going cheaply and just down the road. Got lucky with that one!
 

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PaulArthur

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Perfect sense thank you, I like those push to open fittings. We expect great things of your next project lol.
It’s toy boxes next for the kids, but then I’ve got a pile of ash to get through and a wall that needs a big fancy book case... going to do a star burst pattern on that one too, I think, but in a different way.
 

Cooper

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I really like this chest. I have wanted to make one like it for some time. I am curious why you have a plinth and about he plugs or dowels on the lid. Are they just a feature or are they holding tenons in? I had to have a turkey oak cut down, as it was too close to the house and had it converted into boards so I could make a chest from it.
I have a problem that even though I seasoned the boards for a long time, stacked on batons, they have curled a bit so I need to rip them into strips, square, thickness then joint back. This is all a bit too much, even for this fit old man, to do by hand and I wonder if anyone knows of a local workshop in south east London, ideally Bromley where I could take the boards to prepare them?
Thanks
Martin
 

SteL

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Right then. This is my second ever piece of furniture - two and a half hard weeks for meet a deadline. Pretty pleased with it -
Glad to be having a week or two off. Is though!
For the top I cut veneers using a band saw, and then the bottom and sides are standard veneers, all with chunky solid lipping. The base is solid. Very heavy, and hopefully child-resistant!
Please tell me that this is your second piece of furniture, but you're a professional musical instrument maker or I might as well give up now!

Well done, It looks great.
 

Woodmouse

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Right then. This is my second ever piece of furniture - two and a half hard weeks for meet a deadline. Pretty pleased with it -
Glad to be having a week or two off. Is though!
For the top I cut veneers using a band saw, and then the bottom and sides are standard veneers, all with chunky solid lipping. The base is solid. Very heavy, and hopefully child-resistant!
Another excellent piece of work. They're some truly talented people on this forum.
 

NickM

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I really like this chest. I have wanted to make one like it for some time. I am curious why you have a plinth and about he plugs or dowels on the lid. Are they just a feature or are they holding tenons in? I had to have a turkey oak cut down, as it was too close to the house and had it converted into boards so I could make a chest from it.
I have a problem that even though I seasoned the boards for a long time, stacked on batons, they have curled a bit so I need to rip them into strips, square, thickness then joint back. This is all a bit too much, even for this fit old man, to do by hand and I wonder if anyone knows of a local workshop in south east London, ideally Bromley where I could take the boards to prepare them?
Thanks
Martin
The plinth is there principally to deal with the base of the box. The box has a plywood base (so I don't have to worry about wood movement). I could have put it in a slot or in a rebate in the sides, but it's not very easy to cut those when you have through dovetails (you need to do stopped grooves/rebates so they don't show on the outside). My solution (and I've no idea if it's the right one!) was to simply glue and pin the ply base to the bottom of the sides and then add the plinth to cover it all. The plinth extends underneath so it covers the pins underneath as well (picture of the box bottom below). It's a bit of a faff to make the plinth to be honest but I quite like the look of it.

IMG_7937.jpeg


The dowels are part of the "breadboard ends". If the lid was made just with a single piece running all the way across the box, there would be a strong possibility of that warping (twisting or cupping). Breadboard ends are designed to keep it all flat. The centre piece has three tenons on each side running into mortises on the end pieces. The dowels run through the ends and the hidden tenons. The centre tenon has a snug fit and is glued in and the dowel also fits snugly in the hole in the tenon. The two outer tenons are not glued, have oversized mortises, and the holes for the dowels are elongated to for wood movement.

I hope this explanation is clear without going into masses of detail. I'm making another lid at the moment and will try to take some pictures as I go along. If you google breadboard ends you'll find some more fulsome explanations.
 

bp122

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Right then. This is my second ever piece of furniture - two and a half hard weeks for meet a deadline. Pretty pleased with it -
Glad to be having a week or two off. Is though!
For the top I cut veneers using a band saw, and then the bottom and sides are standard veneers, all with chunky solid lipping. The base is solid. Very heavy, and hopefully child-resistant!
Looks spectacular!
 

Benchwayze

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Lovely tool chest. Nice workmanship and aesthetic finish. I think you'll find that this type of chest was usually made by an apprentice over the term of his indenture. It would be envisaged that the chest would be carried around the country as the 'journey man' looked for work. So a plinth at the bottom and a dust seal around the lid not only looked well, but also protected the chest itself . The plinth also lifts the chest off the floor as a measure against damp. Having said that I'm only a Brummie so I could be wrong.

John
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