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Plasterboard work in window reveal

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Benchwayze

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Hi folks.

I just ordered some vertical blinds for my lounge and kitchen.
The rep came to measure up yesterday, and we discovered that one window reveal in the single story extension, needs new plasterboard fitted along the top of the reveal. The extension had already been built when I purchased the house 45 years ago, so everything looked quite new then. Now though... Well, whoever built this extension was clearly wearing a stetson at the time!

Now I am looking to replace the plasterboard myself, as already three 'builders' have said the job is too small and one other just didn't turn up today to quote me!

I have located some Moisture Resist board, but I have also discovered that the plaster board was just stuck to the brickwork above the window with no substantial lintel above! Not much I can do about it right now; but nothing seems to be loose, so it's fingers crossed. I shall just have to rely on adhesive again.

I am going to supervise Number One Son to do this. He is good at following supervision, so I am fairly confident; however I need to know the best brand of adhesive to use. I am also thinking of plugging a run of 7/8" sill board to the brickwork, after the plasterboard is up; the brickwork, is sound.

It's just that the window frame is acting as a lintel! If I have the expense of a lintel being fitted, and the frame re installed, then the blinds must be cancelled while I save up a bit more cash! :dunno:

John (Hopeful!)
 

Lons

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You just need wall board adhesive to stick it John but nothing will stick properly for long if you're getting damp in.
How many brick courses over the window, is it half brick with external cladding or cavity wall? A pic or two would help. Depending on the window size and what the structure it's carrying consists of it's not uncommon that a separate lintel hasn't been installed though not good practice, there may even be some steel angle higher up.
 

Benchwayze

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Tis a long story Bob. The leak was repaired a few years back but with my wife's illness and my problems I never got around to clearing up properly. I just mopped up and things looked okay. It seems that now everything has dried out the plasterboard just sagged. It's a cavity wall and there is no moisture there now. Just a mess of sagging plaster board and a ruined mantel clock! My immobility had meant that I kept out of that room since I left hospital . Not much room to walk about until today!
Ding-Dong!

John
 

novocaine

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can you see in to the cavity?
there maybe a lintel cavity tray, metal tray from the course above the window.
I'd want to fit a cavity closer, mainly to stop anything dropping out and landing on the back of the plaster board.
then glue up with board adhesive. you'll need a few lengths of timber to prop it up while it cures.
 

Benchwayze

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Hi Novocaine.

Thanks for your input. The wall is a cavity wall; inside it's thermalite blocks. Only the lower half is actually a wall. The top half is the window frame with two courses of bricks above the UPVC window frame. The ends of the ceiling/roof joists rest on these bricks with no fixings whatsoever, not even furring strips, (should that be firring?) and are held in place with just the weight of the roof. Jerry built in the extreme. When the new window frames were installed I was lucky not to have the upper brickwork collapse. I have since had the whole extension re-pointed, as the mortar was mostly sand! At least I know that was done properly.

In the early 80s, the felt roof failed and there was a major leak. (this is when I discovered the shambles of the roof joists), I had to deal as best I could. I found the roof boarding was inferior quality chipboard, soaked through and kaput. I replaced this rubbish with some culled floorboards (on offer) from a local timber merchant. I even patched knot holes with bits of marine ply! I corrected the joists as best I could; giving the roof the necessary 'fall'. I secured the ends of the joists and replaced soffit and fascia. I also re-insulated between the joists, as this had only been done for half of the roof area; presumably to get around a surprise visit by building inspector! I think you can imagine the scenario.

At the time my old Dad was a retired asphalt spreader, who spent his working life on his knees, hand spreading Trinidad lake asphalt. He unearthed one of his ex-apprentices and a proper job was arranged. All of my flat roofs were subsequently re-boarded, and asphalted properly and are still holding up well, despite the extra weight of asphalt.

I value my intact femurs, and dare not risk climbing onto a builders' plank. So I must ask my son for his help. I intend to strip the whole length of the window reveal, so it's going to be a messy job! But if I want to have the vertical blinds installed, I have to do this. Right shall prevail!

Cheers

John
 
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