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planer or thicknesser first or planer thicknesser?

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rs6mra

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Hi Guys,
As per the topic, I would like some advice as to which way I should go. I do like all things wood and I would like to add to my set up as stated above. I have no specific needs but l love to make stuff. In the last 4 months for instance I have made Versailles planters, a bench (basic), window boxes and I have just put together a BBQ shelter which I'll have to kit out.
So for now nothing really to do with being half-decent stuff for indoors. I was going to buy the new Triton planer today but paused to seek further advice. I don't want to throw money at stuff because I have another hobby but I do like to have decent tools. To give you some idea about myself I have just picked up the Makita track saw kit and I have been saying to myself why have I waited this long. However last week I got rid of my Record bandsaw as I have only used it once in over 2 years. I know I'll regret it! Space is a wee bit of an issue as I have plans to build a decent sized workshop which however comes with its own challenges but at the moment I am working out of 3 sheds...........so far from ideal!!!
On the BBQ shelter I built, I used some 100x50 planks of oaks, and my goodness some of them are wonk wonk wonky. So with stuff like that, I'll like to see it at its best or almost otherwise I might as well use what I have on the smoker.
I have waffled a bit but I hope you get the gist of where I am coming from.........
 

Selwyn

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nice scheppach hms260 on here for sale. Maybe a bit dear but then everything is
 

RueFondary

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In a pinch, you can get a thicknesser to act as a planer (mounting boards on a rigid and flat surface which will slide into the thicknesser)... and 'lunch box' thicknesser are relatively affordable and compact, while accepting fairly wide boards (300mm/12" is typical). For one off needs, this is perfectly workable... and it will still have a role if one day you upgrade to a planer or planer/thicknesser

A good planer only (typically what the US folks call a jointer) or planer/thicknesser of similar capacity will be much more costly and will have a bigger footprint... but it's a much better solution for regular planing of rough saw boards.
 

Fitzroy

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As above you can use a thicknesser as a planer with a jig, you can’t use a planer as a thicknesser. I think a planer on its own is not very useful.

F.
 

Oddbod70

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Ditto. It’ll bit slower using a thicknesser as a jointer all the time but it’ll work well enough. Ive done it often with boards that are too long for my jointer
 

DBT85

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As others already said, a lunchbox planer with a sled upon which you can place wonky (technical term) board to will act as a planer and you can then send it through again to thickness it.

It won't joint an edge, but a tracksaw can do that.
 

I’ve got wood worm!

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Hi Guys,
As per the topic, I would like some advice as to which way I should go. I do like all things wood and I would like to add to my set up as stated above. I have no specific needs but l love to make stuff. In the last 4 months for instance I have made Versailles planters, a bench (basic), window boxes and I have just put together a BBQ shelter which I'll have to kit out.
So for now nothing really to do with being half-decent stuff for indoors. I was going to buy the new Triton planer today but paused to seek further advice. I don't want to throw money at stuff because I have another hobby but I do like to have decent tools. To give you some idea about myself I have just picked up the Makita track saw kit and I have been saying to myself why have I waited this long. However last week I got rid of my Record bandsaw as I have only used it once in over 2 years. I know I'll regret it! Space is a wee bit of an issue as I have plans to build a decent sized workshop which however comes with its own challenges but at the moment I am working out of 3 sheds...........so far from ideal!!!
On the BBQ shelter I built, I used some 100x50 planks of oaks, and my goodness some of them are wonk wonk wonky. So with stuff like that, I'll like to see it at its best or almost otherwise I might as well use what I have on the smoker.
I have waffled a bit but I hope you get the gist of where I am coming from.........
I take it you were looking at the Triton TPT125?
I can’t find it in stock anywhere in the UK! Looking to buy for the reasons listed above but can’t find it for love nor money and am not convinced enough to spend for the dewalt or makita.
 

frank horton

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I use a slightly better version of DeWalt bench top planer....yes it has a jointer as well.....

the one ur looking at does cost a little more than the Triton but I think it would be a better choice......
I expect mine to last another 10 years at least.....more really...
Good resale value when u upgrade.....if ever....
and the amount of work it saves is priceless.....
I would guess there are plenty around for sale used.......
 

rs6mra

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Thanks for your input guys.
The Scheppach looks ideal but too big.
The Triton TPT125 is the one I was looking at and I cannot find it anywhere either.
So the hunt is now on for a thicknesser. Is a Dewalt that much better than a triton to warrant an extra £200?
 

sploo

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The problem with planers (US: jointer) is that you really want something large (otherwise it's not that useful for flattening any material of length). Hence why a sled for a thicknesser can useful.

One other solution is to use a hand plane to knock off high spots and twists before using a thicknesser.

I've had the Metabo DH330 benchtop thicknesser for a number of years and it's been really good. I can't comment on the similar DeWalt, but I understand their DW735 model is very good - but seems to be difficult to get in the UK.

I later picked up a Titan planer thicknesser from Screwfix when it was on offer (Titan TTB579PLN 204mm Electric Planer Thicknesser 230V). You get what you pay for (it's not great) but I have occasionally found it useful for initial planing of moderately long stock (though I had to build a new fence as the original is trash). I've never used it for thicknessing duties as I have the Metabo.
 

recipio

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The Scheppach has rubber rollers - the only PT that has, as far as I know. This allows you to thickness down to about 3 mm with no roller marks on the wood. Its a crying shame that Scheppach have stopped making the HM 260 so I'd grab one now if I were you.:)
 

sploo

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The Scheppach has rubber rollers - the only PT that has, as far as I know. This allows you to thickness down to about 3 mm with no roller marks on the wood. Its a crying shame that Scheppach have stopped making the HM 260 so I'd grab one now if I were you.:)
That's useful to know. The Metabo DH300 (thicknesser only) has rubber rollers too.

I have an old 12" Holzmann planer thicknesser (~300kg of metal) that I'd been restoring (though it's been sitting for ages unfinished). I noticed the rollers on that are really aggressive metal "teeth", and it can make quite a mess of the surface.
 

recipio

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Ha Ha . I have two Scheppachs for about 30 years and have had absolutely no problems with the rollers. I can't understand why Scheppach have dumbed down so much -- they used to make quality machinery until they started to get their cast iron tables from China.:whistle:
 

Hornbeam

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the Startright SD310 has rubber rollers. The metal serrated drive roller doesnt limit the minimum thickness what it does it limit the minimum amount you have to take off on a pass to remove the teeth marks. This will also depend upon the roller pressure but is somewhere in the region of 0.5 to 1mm dependent upon the hardness of teh wood being thicknessed
 

recipio

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Good to know. The rubber rollers allow you to finesse the finished thickness. Its very handy for instance for milling an inlay line into a groove where a few micromillimeters make all the difference.
 
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Are people really using the sled method for full projects? (furniture builds)

That seems crazy to me. Having to wedge and glue each piece down must make things so much slower.
 

Oddbod70

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Are people really using the sled method for full projects? (furniture builds)

That seems crazy to me. Having to wedge and glue each piece down must make things so much slower.
When its the best option yeah. It depends how important your time is to you I guess. I mean, some weirdos even use hand tools just because they want to. :)
 

sploo

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Are people really using the sled method for full projects? (furniture builds)

That seems crazy to me. Having to wedge and glue each piece down must make things so much slower.
Depends really; if you have one of the "lunchbox" style 12" thickness planers and have a long ~12" wide board to plane flat then the sled route may well be the quickest solution (given that most people probably don't have the room for a monster 12" cast iron planer/jointer). Certainly a few wedges and hot melt glue would likely be quicker than using a hand plane for flattening one side (and I say that as a hand plane "advocate").
 

kirkpoore1

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I've had the experience of taking light passes with a DW734 thicknesser and getting the board flat without using a sled. You have to be patient, but it works fine.

Kirk
 

sploo

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I've had the experience of taking light passes with a DW734 thicknesser and getting the board flat without using a sled. You have to be patient, but it works fine.

Kirk
Yes - that's a good point. If the material is thick enough to not deflect, and can be placed with the hollow side down (assuming the thicknesser infeed and outfeed tables are long enough) then that is a practical solution.
 
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