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Planer Accident

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Just a reminder of how NOT to use a planer/thicknesser

[Warning very gory photos and an odd sweary term]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDeZaPhmY8Y

Some people will get annoyed by me posting this, but I personally think showing these kinds of accidents is a good reminder of just how easily things can go wrong, and how we should not get complacent, and to respect these tools

I was introduced to power tools at a very young age, and probably would have done similar if I could have afforded one. Makes me shudder to think of some of the stupid STUPID things I used to do.

[Not me by the way!]
 

Noel

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transatlantic":2z6wuqq6 said:
Just a reminder of how NOT to use a planer/thicknesser

[Warning very gory photos and an odd sweary term]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDeZaPhmY8Y

Some people will get annoyed by me posting this, but I personally think showing these kinds of accidents is a good reminder of just how easily things can go wrong, and how we should not get complacent, and to respect these tools

I was introduced to power tools at a very young age, and probably would have done similar if I could have afforded one. Makes me shudder to think of some of the stupid STUPID things I used to do.

[Not me by the way!]

Two things certainly obvious, a lesson for all of us.
 
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I've always thought the guard on the Titan is horribly flimsy, but in this case it would have prevented the injury, if set correctly.

As for using the planer on an unsecure surface, yeah ... not the smartest move.
 

nev

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'kin silly person!
There are accidents and there are things that happen to morons. This, I suggest, is the latter.

And as for "call 999!, call an ambulance!" - get in a *&^% taxi or get a lift and leave the ambulances available for people that actually need one!

If the moron in question is a member here, can you make yourself known so I can remove you from the membership. :tool:
 

Garno

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It wasn't me in the video I only did my middle finger. :( Still not 100%

The op is right for pointing out just how easy it is to get injured, trust me for those couple of seconds of not concentrating it hurts.
Gary
 

Trevanion

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Thanks Transatlantic, videos like these are a very good reminder of just how dangerous even hobbyist level kit is if improperly used. As others have said, a proper bench and guarding would've prevented that 100%.

I agree with Nev that it wasn't really ambulance worthy, it was really only a minor flesh wound, all things considered. If it were me I would much rather the ambulance go for a child having a seizure or someone who has lost a limb VS my stupid little mistake. Probably would've been quicker to get to the A&E by car than by calling an ambulance anyway. He is very lucky he didn't catch the ring on his finger, most likely would've torn off the finger if it had.

Knock on wood, I can still count to ten without taking my socks off. Stay safe friends!
 

Ttrees

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The worst thing about it, is that he got a warning that it was going to happen, using his finger briefly against the fence to stabilise it.
Accidents happen so fast, but not this one.
Makes the case for making a proper base for your machine...

The lesson here folks should take home, is not to make a mobile base that can't retract the castors.
I've seen folks here, use blocks to rise the machine off of the castors.
The thing with this approach is, that in most cases, you can't be sure that those blocks will stay put,
and before you know it, it could wheel away from you, causing something similar to happen.

Carl Holmgren or Bob Minchin lever designs are worth fabricating up, and quite satisfying to have made for your machines.

Tom
 

Osvaldd

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oh lawd.
After my belt sander accident, that required a skin graft operation about a year ago, I haven’t touched power tools ever since…
 

doctor Bob

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anyone see the great yorkshire show on channel 5, guy in a pro workshop pushing oak over an un-guarded planer, made me wince. Be enough for HSE to shut them down I'd have thought.
 

Steve Maskery

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Well on the bright side he disn't actually lose a finger (I don't think), he will recover and have a permanent reminder about why he shouldn't be so stupid.
And kudos for actually admitting it it all so publicly. The more people who see this the less chance there is of them doing the same, I would suggest.
 

Lonsdale73

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Trevanion":3ja7gpf1 said:
I used to work in the print industry and with a number of guys who'd lost digits to printing presses. They're fitted with guards which need to be removed during plate changes, maintenance etc, when the machine is generally idle anyway. However it is sometimes necessary to do some plate cleaning during the run. I'm sure the operator's manual states that the printer should be stopped before attempting such an operation but the print guys are usually under so much pressure to keep the presses running at optimal speed that there's a tendency to slow it down rather than stop it and removing the guards makes it easier to to clean 'on the fly'. Also makes it easier to catch the rags being used to clean the plates and drag a hand into the rollers. We had two such instances in a short space of time and, after the second one, a director had me produce some signs stating guards were to be in place at all times and cleaning attempted only when press was idle. Last line was to read "By order of the maagement" and dated, the date I was instructed to use predating the second incident by at least a month! This was to placate the H&S Executives who would come in to investigate the accident. The person involved in the second incident hadn't been with us long, was still on his probationary period and lacked the confidence to be the one who stopped the press 'just' to clean it. Even after sacrificing a finger, his main concern was he'd lose his job but he was assured it would still be there when he was ready to return to work. The company kept their word on that score but as soon as he received what was considered a very generous compensation payout he was never seen again. Well, not in the workplace. He was my mate's brother so I continued to see him and why I know he was offered as much as he did not contradicting the timing of the signs I produced.
 

cornishjoinery

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This is precisely why i dont agree with cheap DIY kit being sold to anyone.
The only people using machinary should be proffessional woodworkers that have had a degree of training. Im still amazed that you can walk into homebase for example and buy a router or skillsaw.
 

DBT85

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As soon as it moved the first time I just thought "back out now".

People need to read the dsmed instructions that will say silly things like "only use on stable surface" or "don't operate with long sleeves".
 

Trevanion

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cornishjoinery":2pwgmemt said:
This is precisely why i dont agree with cheap DIY kit being sold to anyone.
The only people using machinary should be proffessional woodworkers that have had a degree of training. Im still amazed that you can walk into homebase for example and buy a router or skillsaw.
Judging by your previous comments you really have it in for DIYers :lol: There are some people here that would very humbly call themselves hobbyists but they work they produce far exceeds anything I could do and I work with wood and machinery for over 60 hours a week. There also plenty of professionals here, woodworkers or not, and the cumulative information possessed by so many varied characters is invaluable. I reckon you could ask almost any question on any subject here and get a very detailed, coherent answer because of the massive range of individuals from various backgrounds. I love it.

Perhaps you should go and create that "proffesoonal" forum you were talking about creating here and here, since this one seems to cause you much distain.

The expert in anything was once a beginner.
 

Bm101

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cornishjoinery":vy1d7co3 said:
This is precisely why i dont agree with cheap DIY kit being sold to anyone.
The only people using machinary should be proffessional woodworkers that have had a degree of training. Im still amazed that you can walk into homebase for example and buy a router or skillsaw.
Quite right. I was once shocked at the fact that when at the coast for the day with the family I was able to swim nearly twenty metres out to sea without being darted, sedated and humanely netted by the coastguard for my own good.
Another time I tried to climb a tree as a child. Luckily an Hse official managed to wing me with a lucky shot from a .22 so that was good.
What planet are you on CJ?
 

Marineboy

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I’d have thought that DIYers, who work on their projects on an occasional basis, could be said to be safer than a pro who works with machines 40 hours a week. It’s easier to become complacent if you’re doing something day in, day out. I know that when I’m using the router or bandsaw I check everything 2 or 3 times before I switch on, ie is the router cutter going the right way, will it slide along the work with no obstruction, have I got push sticks for the saw etc etc. I must say though, although I have no need of it and so don’t possess one, the table saw does scare me.
 

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