Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Plane tuning

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

stuartpaul

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2003
Messages
1,008
Reaction score
15
Location
Somerset
I've got 3 old stanley's that I'm going to spend some time on and wonder if anyone has used anything other that a sheet of glass for the truing process?

I'm happy enough to invest but at £40 ish for something I can't see me using very much I wondered if there are alternatives to give the flatness without the cost (ever the tight @rse!).

I'd thought of MDF but not sure this will be flat enough, - or would it be flat enough for something that doesn't have to be perfect? I'm not looking for engineering tolerances in this project.

Advice and thoughts appreciated.

Thanks

Stuart
 

Crooked Tree

Established Member
Joined
29 Nov 2009
Messages
114
Reaction score
0
Location
Wiltshire
I flattened the sole of mine (a bit) using sandpaper on a piece of old kitchen worktop (the formica topped chipboard stuff). If you are not fussed with perfection then this worked for me. I held down the sandpaper using a batten clamped along one side.
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
3
Location
Derbyshire
stuartpaul":31pokoez said:
.....I'm not looking for engineering tolerances in this project.

....
Is it really necessary at all?
The few times I've done this has been on 60* grit wet n dry, paper backed, which will stick nicely to a flat impervious surface by surface tension or some sort of general stiction, if well flooded with white spirit or similar (or probably any liquid). Cloth backed doesn't stick so well, and paper backed may take a few passes to get it flat down - helped if it is stored flat between boards to start with.
The surface I use is my CI planer table, but if you haven't got one, then glass, marble, formica, will do, AFAIK.
No need to polish. 60 grit is all you need as long as it is worked to and fro, not across. It will feel slightly directional at first but once the sharpness is worn off it will be low friction. If you want it polished just use it often for 50 years or so!

* or 40 grit if it's really bad.

PS to be realistic Crooked Tree's method above is good enough. I'm being a bit fussy!
 

xy mosian

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2009
Messages
2,805
Reaction score
2
Location
West Yorkshire
Allylearm":3j4ohze0 said:
What about a reclamation yard for a piece of marble/onyx
My own chunk of glass was an off-cut from a glazier. Something about 5" wide, about 30" long and anything over 10 or 12mm. Straight out of the scrap bin.

xy
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,029
Reaction score
472
Location
Bristol
I use a mirror that came out of a skip when a shop was being refitted. No need to spend even £4 let alone £40.
 

mn pete

Established Member
Joined
31 May 2011
Messages
182
Reaction score
0
Location
Denver, CO USA
I'd say a heavy piece of glass or marble/granite. The nice thing is that you can use them with some wet sandpaper to keep your water stones flattened as well.
 

goldeneyedmonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jan 2010
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
0
Location
Buxton, Derbyshire
I've used a granite offcut in the past, works a treat, use the weight of the granite to hold down the abrasive folded over the side. F.O.C from a worktop fitter, just bob your head in and ask.

Cheers _Dan.
 

Harbo

Established Member
Joined
13 Nov 2006
Messages
5,548
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
A strip of acrylic with some valve grinding paste works well

Rod
 

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
0
Location
North Suffolk
stuartpaul":3exj6e3s said:
I've got 3 old stanley's that I'm going to spend some time on and wonder if anyone has used anything other that a sheet of glass for the truing process?

I'm happy enough to invest but at £40 ish for something I can't see me using very much I wondered if there are alternatives to give the flatness without the cost (ever the tight @rse!).

I'd thought of MDF but not sure this will be flat enough, - or would it be flat enough for something that doesn't have to be perfect? I'm not looking for engineering tolerances in this project.

Advice and thoughts appreciated.

Thanks

Stuart
A plane sole needs to be flat to roughly the tolerance of the shavings you're planning to make - so a jack plane can have a fairly "sinuous" sole without causing trouble.

Once you've decided HOW flat you want your sole, you can start to look at the process to hit your target.

Be wary of straight/flat things that aren't rigid enough to STAY straight/flat during your process, a nice piece of float glass being the prime example.

BugBear
 

stuartpaul

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2003
Messages
1,008
Reaction score
15
Location
Somerset
Thanks all, - useful stuff.

My intention is to work them to a bit of a 'shine' as they have a particular sentimental value for me so probably more effort than some might consider worthwhile :D

BB - yes, aware than some 'flat' things won't always stay flat so need to have some cognisance of what's underneath and shim/support where necessary.

I've been recommended to use tempered glass (hence the £40) but fairly certain I'll be using something else. I like the idea of the planer bed but worried about creating a load of cr@p that might end up in the workings!

Stuart
 
Top