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StevieB

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Having seen quite a few pictures of others workshops now, I notice most people keep their planes sole down on a shelf/bench/cupboard, sometimes in a sock first. I have tended to leave mine on their side so that I dont have to keep resetting the blade below the sole everytime I want to use it. Is this a bad idea? So far I only have a couple of cheap planes but I dont want to develop bad habits before getting something decent, so any advice appreceiated.

Steve.
 

dedee

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I keep (most) of mine on their side in a drawer wrapped in anti-rust paper and a sock. Wooden dowels attached to the drawer bottom stop them sliding about. If I had got the dimensions of the drawer correct I would have stood them up in order to get more in.



Andy
 

Alf

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StevieB":3rudscoe said:
I have tended to leave mine on their side so that I dont have to keep resetting the blade below the sole everytime I want to use it. Is this a bad idea?
Yes. You'll keep having to reset the blade instead of being able to plane 'n' go! :wink:

The laying-on-the-side vs. sole-down debate rages long and hard. The gist of the argument is that lying the plane on its side will protect the razor-sharp edge from damage. Theories abound on why this has been advocated, from "well you never know what you might put that sharp edge down on if you're on site" to "it's the only way to stop school boys trashing the planes in the school workshop". Take your pick. Arguments against include other tools on the bench getting knocked against the blade, the lateral adjuster on a Bailey is easily knocked and it's just not as convenient as just grabbing it from an upright position. Many, many people opt for the compromise of having the plane on its sole, but providing protection for the blade as well. That can range from lined shelves/drawers/tray on the bench to a simple ledge on the shelf to just raise the toe of the plane enough to clear the blade. I tend to do the latter; I just use off cuts of thin stuff and keep a few handy to rest the plane toe on. Some people even make a sort of bench hook type thing to keep their ready use planes on while they're on the bench. But if truth be told, if you're using your planes on a wooden bench then you can just as well put them straight down on the top and stop worrying. If wood was harmful of plane blades then they wouldn't be much use would they? :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

ike

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I've just finished designing an 'heirloom' tool chest for my 'top drawer' handtools and decided to line the drawers and top tray with green (or maybe red) baize (á la machinists chest), and the plane's sit sole down. Over time I figure the baize will gradually absorb the camelia oil off them and give some added protection.

I'd like to post some piccies as I go. Don't hold your breath though folks, as it's in the queue with wooden toys/possible other Xmas pressies, workshop extension (involving digging a very large hole - I should manage that fairly easily :roll: ), not to mention Landrover restoration. :?

PS Apart from birch ply drawer bottoms, the chest will be in oak (recycled from an early 20th century wardrobe).

'pologies for the ramble...

Ike
 

Alf

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ike":21d8dddp said:
I've just finished designing an 'heirloom' tool chest for my 'top drawer' handtools and decided to line the drawers and top tray with green (or maybe red) baize (á la machinists chest), and the plane's sit sole down. Over time I figure the baize will gradually absorb the camelia oil off them and give some added protection.
Be careful - not all baize is necessarily greated equal. Get thee to The Porch search for "Felt" and read some of the messages with regard to the nastinesses that can cause rust on your tools. :shock:

ike":21d8dddp said:
I'd like to post some piccies as I go.
Gosh, yes please. Looking forward to it. :D

Cheers, Alf
 

ike

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Thanks for the heads up Alf. I might be able to scrounge some offcuts from here.

West of England cloth is world famous for quality and has been made in Stroud for at least 150 years. Incidentally, apart from billiard cloth, Strachans (now Milliken) are otherwise most well known for the only ever manufacturer of red wool cloth for Guards uniforms.

cheers

Ike
 
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