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plane handle horn breakage...deliberate?

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Hi yall i was just wondering if ppl break the horn off their handle on PURPOSE!!? i must admit it does feel kinda better as little wood touches the web between ur thumb and index. Discuss.
 

bugbear

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enterthedragon":45gwxbeu said:
Hi yall i was just wondering if ppl break the horn off their handle on PURPOSE!!? i must admit it does feel kinda better as little wood touches the web between ur thumb and index. Discuss.
No, I don't think most broken tote tips are deliberate.

Handles can be modifed for comfort, or new ones made.

What do you think?

BugBear
 
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i mean it doesnt look too bad if u can fashion it into a stub ie no 'remains' of the horn like a broken rhyno horn, get it.
 

jimi43

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I think they are accidents waiting to happen but I do get a warped pleasure out of restoring them...

From a design point of view I think it is a beautiful sweep ending at a point...anything else looks ugly.

Jim
 

GazPal

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enterthedragon":3s3t8gi3 said:
i mean it doesnt look too bad if u can fashion it into a stub ie no 'remains' of the horn like a broken rhyno horn, get it.

One drawback from having a handle tip shear off is it can tend to reduce your effective grasp of the handle during use and they tend to prove more functional if restored/repaired. Repairs aren't too difficult :wink:
 

custard

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It's interesting that Karl Holtey shapes his infill handles with only a residual "tip", significantly less than the original Norris designs. Personally I prefer the traditional design. Yes, they're more vulnerable, but as well as looking elegant it gives a reassuring feeling when you're handling a weighty plane.
 

GazPal

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custard":25vk6950 said:
It's interesting that Karl Holtey shapes his infill handles with only a residual "tip", significantly less than the original Norris designs. Personally I prefer the traditional design. Yes, they're more vulnerable, but as well as looking elegant it gives a reassuring feeling when you're handling a weighty plane.
The vulnerability of plane and saw handle horns only really becomes an issue if a tool is abused - accidentally or voluntarily - and shouldn't prove a problem if one takes proper care of equipment, although accidents do happen. Much of their form is derived from the makers aesthetic preferences, as well as practical issues and there's nothing to prevent a user from adapting a tool grip to suit his/her own requirements, e.g. Re-profiling, nipping and tucking to suit hand size, grip, etc..
 

bugbear

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GazPal":muhu8gxu said:
... and there's nothing to prevent a user from adapting a tool grip to suit his/her own requirements, e.g. Re-profiling, nipping and tucking to suit hand size, grip, etc..
Seconded. Several handles in my workshop have felt the careful touch of a round rasp.

BugBear
 
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