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Pine Garden furniture ?

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smiley65

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Hi all, i was going to make some garden chairs using pine then stain and then put some kind of weather sealer on it all, is pine ok to use as looking around at prices of other kinds of are to costly
 

That would work

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Absolutely. Redwood pine is a better choice than 'whitewood' which is weaker and less durable.
Just make sure it's well coated with an exterior preservative of your choice and it will be just fine.
 

That would work

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Go to a timber yard or builders merchant (not wickes or bq)
Definitely worth using redwood over whitewood which is much weaker.
 

Just4Fun

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We have some pine garden furniture that is getting on for 30 years old. Still usable but it is showing its age, with all joints being a little loose these days. On the other hand it lives outside all winter and each winter gets covered with a foot or 2 of snow, with temperatures well below freezing, so much harsher conditions than in the UK. I keep promising to make replacements but these are still usable so that job never gets to the top of the list.
 

Woody2Shoes

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Just4Fun":2xqc99jy said:
We have some pine garden furniture that is getting on for 30 years old. Still usable but it is showing its age, with all joints being a little loose these days. On the other hand it lives outside all winter and each winter gets covered with a foot or 2 of snow, with temperatures well below freezing, so much harsher conditions than in the UK. I keep promising to make replacements but these are still usable so that job never gets to the top of the list.
I think that the (western half mostly) UK has a uniquely harsh environment for softwood outdoors because it's nearly always wet. At least snow and ice are dry until the spring thaw!

I would try and make sure that the furniture can keep its feet dry - contact with the ground is bad for accelerating rot. So maybe metal studs or similar in the feet. I'd also go for "defensive design" in terms of joints that will not trap water and avoiding sharp arrises to maximise the life of protective finishes etc etc
 
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