Peltier fan

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NikNak

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Hi all.....

I'm after a peltier fan. Similar to those that are used on a wood burning stove. But those require a fairly high temperature to work. Is it possible to get one that will work from say 20C up to 50ish C ..? :-k
 

Marineboy

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I may be wrong, but my understanding is that a Sterling engine makes use of the Peltier effect to work. So they are one and the same.

I’m no physicist but I would guess that the temperature gradient needs to be higher than the 30 degrees the OP wants. Certainly my stove fan doesn’t start spinning until the stove top is way hotter than 50.
 

RichardG

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I doubt you’ll find a COTS device to do that as the main application is for wood burners. However, there are Peltier devices that work better at lower temperatures, the key is the cross junction temperature which dictates the amount of Volts/Amps you can extract. You’ll need to use a large heat sink to keep the room side at room temperature and then an appropriate sized motor/fan for the power output you have. There’s several good websites for determining the power output and Peltier selection.

Richard
 

Droogs

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the thermo-electric principle of the peltier fans that are used in stove top fan due to the materials used needs a temperature above 60C before they usually start to work. A stirling engine uses the same principal but can operate in a much wider temp range and will work therefore at a much lower temperature a fantastic article is linked below for one designed to work in temps below 50C:
https://www.matec-conferences.org/artic ... 04003.html
 

Rorschach

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Marineboy":d3jazpuh said:
I may be wrong, but my understanding is that a Sterling engine makes use of the Peltier effect to work. So they are one and the same.

You are indeed wrong :lol:

No electricity involved in Stirling engines.
 

Marineboy

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Yes, apologies, my knowledge of physics is indeed limited. I've done a bit of research on both types, very interesting.
 
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