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Patterns for pyrography

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Democritus

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Hi Guys,
Does anyone know of a website that publishes free, downloadable, pyrography patterns suitable for decorating bowls? Martin Saben-Smith has a couple of YouTube videos using such patterns, but, try as I might, I can’t find a site where it’s easy to get them.
D
 

Phill05

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type in (tattoo vectors) or whatever patterns you need and you will find a lot interesting work.
 

Democritus

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Cheers, guys.
I did google it, but most hits show images of bowls and what have you that have been decorated with pyrography.
I’ll give it another go, and, as Greg suggests, try to contact MSS.
D.
 
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Tony51

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Hi you can use the colouring books for adults ,cheapest in the remainder book shops on the high street,The Works are one. Amazon have metal stencils which can be used over and over. With carbon paper you can transfer any printed image from magazines books etc.
"Pyrography setting light to things and not getting arrested"
Tony
 

Retired

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Hi,

What excellent timing Democritus; I'm gearing up for some pyrography projects this year.


Pinterest is brilliant and I get lots of inspiration all totally free. There's all manner of truly wonderful woodturning to be seen.

Pinterest

When the weather warms up I want to do lots more woodturning; I've never been into turning bowls but I do want to turn more finial lidded boxes and I've turned my first goblet. About two years ago I bought a Peter Child pyrography kit from Turners Retreat but have been too busy to even try it out; now I'm at last on top of all the heavy jobs I'll have more spare time this year to play in my workshop.

I want to embellish my turned items with pyrography and I've also bought a Makita palm router just for use on the lathe; I made a chatter tool ages ago. I've got lots of spindle blanks but now I've got the time its too cold to be in the workshop.

Do you have a photo editing program and if you do you can copy from the sites like Pinterest and edit to your sizes; small patterns can be arranged to suit your work repeating them; randomly; in a line like a ribbon or in a circle.

I've used Gimp for many years; I trust it and it doesn't cause any issues with my computer; it's totally free;

GIMP

YouTube too is excellent for inspiration; here's an example and something I'd like to try adding to something I turn;


Lidded box with finial July 15 2018 (1).JPG


These finial lidded boxes make nice presents.

Woodturning_003.JPG


Four different types of wood blanks in this one.

Are you turning bowls for your own interest or do you intend to sell them. The reason I don't do bowls is they tend to be rather large taking up quite a bit of space but I'm always interested in anything that's turned.

What kind of pyrography kit are you going to use; I'm nosy but also very interested too. ;)

Good luck and please post any progress.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Democritus

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Hi Colin
Just before Christmas I bought a Peter Childs pyrography kit from Oliver’s woodturning, and my wife bought me a book , Sue Walters ‘Pyrography - A Workbook’. So far, i’m still experimenting with the kit. I will never be able to reproduce the sort of work shown in the book as I have very little skill in drawing, even with a pencil, let alone a red hot piece of wire.
I can trace, however, and have produced a design using an old Spirograph toy that I subsequently used on a bowl interior. It didn’t turn out too well, so I cleaned it off and finished the bowl in my normal way. I found it very difficult to burn continuous lines, certainly on the ash that I used. It may be that other timbers react differently, or I may have to learn to hold my mouth differently.
I turn bowls and other things (pens mainly) for my own pleasure, and give them away to friends (when I can force them to take one!). I have never sold anything.
I will have a look at the Pinterest site you recommended, and see what I can get.
Best wishes
D.
 

Jacob

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......I will never be able to reproduce the sort of work shown in the book as I have very little skill in drawing, even with a pencil, let alone a red hot piece of wire.
.....
Practice practice! That's how everybody learns. Even tracing is practice, you are well into it already.
 

SVB

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. I found it very difficult to burn continuous lines, certainly on the ash that I used.
Ash is quite a tricky choice, esp to start with. It has quite pronounced winter / summer growth rings so different density wood that burn differently. I’d recommend starting with something more even grained - sycamore, beech perhaps. Quality birch ply is useful for practice.

Simon.
 

Padster

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I have done some Pyrography, initially with a basic 'solder' type but soon found the limitations of that!

I'd seen Bob Neill demo the Peter Child machine many times at various shows and actually did a one day course with him that was invaluable - absolute dream and a real gent (and his wife too).

As @SVB mentions birch ply is great for practice and that really is the key, that and temperature. Once you understand those you can play with tips and wire thickness, dependant on what you are trying to achieve how you use the 'pen' can make a difference; sometimes a 'stroking' type action is required, other times think of it as a calligraphy pen, occasionally you will want to 'dab' at the material and having a wire brush to clean tips is also good practice.

Just a few snippets I hope will help, and just like woodwork I think we are all always learning so it's all practice right ;-)

Regards

Padster
 

Democritus

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Thanks, Padster. Useful information that I will try to apply to my practice.
Do you think it best to buy the tips ready made, or to make them from the wire that can be bought in reels? Does the thickness of the wire make a difference to the control of the burn? I used one of the ‘ball’ ended tips that came with my kit to try to burn a continuous line. I found that the tip bent very easily under the lightest pressure, almost to 90 degrees to the pen. Needless to say, my continuous line was less than continuous.
Best wishes
D.
 

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Hi,

Good luck Democritus. Like you I'm a novice but unlike you I've only ever tried pyrography to ensure the machine worked when it arrived so already you're well ahead of me. Every time I try to do something I'd like to do something prevents me; the oven door has just broken one of its hinges; normally just a small job but now it's snowing meaning getting covered with snow if I want to do the hinge repair in the workshop. it never fails; two years I've had the pyrography kit and now I'm really keen to try it out yet a more pressing job is preventing me.

Yesterday a picnic table arrived; due to our dire climate I decided to have a go at setting up a pyrography station here in my small office which is our hallway.

Folding Camping Tables Outdoor Garden Picnic Festival Fishing Portable BBQ Patio | eBay

I've already cut up a 4' x 2' x 1/8" sheet of ply into practice size pieces and sanded them; this ply has a light and dark side. A tip from YouTube is to gently wet the ply and when dry re-sand this lifts the grain and the second sanding makes the ply smoother; I'll be trying this.

I agree with SVB in that Ash is a poor timber to practice with and practicing on plywood is a better option then you aren't wasting time turning only having to remove pyrography mistakes; a bit of ply can be thrown away costing little; it's the way I intend to learn.

I've also bought graphite copy paper in readiness; now I need to buy a desert island where I can sit in peace but knowing my luck I'd get up and find 2,000 shipwrecked people wanting me to build them shelter. I'm not moaning because there are many a lot worse off and I'm still here fighting for a bit of peace.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

Democritus

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Hi Colin,
Never rains but it pours!
Good luck with sorting your oven door out. It’s not the best weather to be in the workshop.
I have only a couple of offcuts of ply to use, having used up my stock in the lockdown(s). I’m also worried that skills developed on an ideal material. (ply) may not translate easily to problematic timbers. Anyway, we’ll see.
It will be interesting, and that’s all you can ask for in a hobby. Hopefully we will have the vaccine soon, and that may loosen the restrictions on tool and timber shopping, but I don’t think it will be anywhere near normal much before September.
Best wishes
D
 

Padster

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@Democritus
Thanks, Padster. Useful information that I will try to apply to my practice.
Do you think it best to buy the tips ready made, or to make them from the wire that can be bought in reels? Does the thickness of the wire make a difference to the control of the burn? I used one of the ‘ball’ ended tips that came with my kit to try to burn a continuous line. I found that the tip bent very easily under the lightest pressure, almost to 90 degrees to the pen. Needless to say, my continuous line was less than continuous.
Best wishes
D.
Re: Tips...Actually both, again dependant on what you are trying to do, I wouldn't use a ball tip for a straight continuous line, and if the tip bent (I know this will sound obvious) but you are putting too much pressure on, I would guess this is because the tip isn't hot enough, you want it to glow orange, and then dial it back just a touch, then just like the old saying slow and steady will win the day...
On a scrap piece you can try the same things, lines, shading, curves, writing etc with the different tips, this will help you understand which tip is better suited for what in the way that you do it... as you and I could do the same thing with the same kit and it will vary as the tool is quite personal and you will develop your own way of holding or the style in which you do it.
By the way one of the best tips if I can convey it properly!... is never put the pen onto work in a 'static' fashion as it will burn straight in, as you touch the surface ensure it's moving...

I hope some of this helps...

Padster
 

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