• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Patina Wood Finish - a few questions...

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Aragorn

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2004
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Well it arrived today - Patina. I've got the second coat on some walnut and some maple pieces.
I wanted to ask anyone who is familiar with this product about using it, as it is quite unusual and I'm not feeling particularly intuitive about it!

The instructions say to vigorously rub it into the wood until touch dry..., but how much product are you applying to any given area to work in. In other words, would you say you work an area fairly dry or work in a more heavy coat?

It says there's no need to sand in between coats. Is this the case? Can you build up a lovely smooth finish without sanding?

Finally, it says 2 coats for a non-heat resistant finish - but how many coats are we talking for a heavy duty finish?

Thanks for any help or advice you can offer.
A
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Hey Aragorn,
I rubbed 3 coats onto my bench, don't know about rubbing it until its dry. I just went ahead "a la french polishing", wipe it on in thin layers, letting it go off between layers.
I reckon 5 coats for a tough table top-that shouldn't be too much work!
cheers,
Philly :D
 

Aragorn

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2004
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Thanks Philly

I've got the hang of it a bit better now. It does seem to need working quite thoroughly into the timber with a clean cloth.
The walnut has 4 coats on now and is looking very nice. The maple has three coats on and has come up a treat.

If this finish can withstand the abuse my 3 year old can throw at it then it's a winner.

I'll let you all know.


Just as an aside - I've been a little surprised at the low response to this thread - I'm not complaining at all, just wondering about people's approach to finishing.
Have you all got a finish that you're happy with and tend to use on everything?

Cheers
A
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
have you tried it on the cherry yet? that's where my obsessions currently lie....but I'm a taker of knowledge on this thread rather than a contributer. Hang on, that's true of most of my posts....
 

Aragorn

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2004
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
No not yet on the cherry.
I want to put it to the "kiddie" test on the maple coffee table first, and if it holds up then I'll use it on the cherry and elm.

A
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Aragorn":3j3jf7s4 said:
Just as an aside - I've been a little surprised at the low response to this thread - I'm not complaining at all, just wondering about people's approach to finishing.
Aragorn, speaking for myself, it's down to ignorance, pure and simple. I'm willing to experiment with my lack of knowledge with my own stuff, but I'd hate to give bum advice that might ruin someone else's piece. :shock:

MP, I have a piece of cherry amongst my test pieces, but I've not got round to even putting the second coat on yet :oops: If I get there first, by some miracle, I'll let you know what I think.

Cheers, Alf
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Couldn't contribute here, Aragorn, 'cos I've never used Patina - but your results sound interesting so I will give it a try at some stage. I have tried various finishes with varying degrees of success but I tend to favour an oil finish when it is appropriate for the job in hand.

Trev.
 

Adam

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
3,768
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Aragorn":17pw92oi said:
Have you all got a finish that you're happy with and tend to use on everything?

Cheers
A
I too was avoiding this thread as I don't know anything about Patina.

In answer to your question, yes, I have settled on a finish for everything Danish oil, 5-10 coats depending on project. I don't rub down between coats, just a new one over the old one - and then beeswax to finish.

Adam.
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Alf":3a8wh0ga said:
I'm willing to experiment with my lack of knowledge with my own stuff, but I'd hate to give bum advice that might ruin someone else's piece. :shock:
Alf-where's your sense of adventure? :twisted:
Philly
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Aragorn":x3kkyj52 said:
Just as an aside - I've been a little surprised at the low response to this thread - I'm not complaining at all, just wondering about people's approach to finishing.
Have you all got a finish that you're happy with and tend to use on everything?

Cheers
A
Never used Patina - nor heard of it! I usually use about 5-6 coats of Danish oil and leave it 6 hours between coats. Only rub down the penultimate coat using 600 grit wet and dry (wet) and occasionally put a coat of Black Bison wax over the top. My box in the gallery had the Bison on top.
I also like to use boiled linseed oil occasionally but it take much longer to dry although it does bring a warm tone to the piece

Cheers

Tony
 

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Sorry a bit late on this post - but missed it. Aragorn - I will certainly give Patina a go on my next Screwfix order.
Adam, Tony - do you really apply 5 or 6 coats of Danish oil? Why? I generally finish with Danish oil - but it's rare I can be bothered to apply more than 3 coats - and sometimes only 2! You must have patience of saints.
Cheers
Gidon
 

Gary H

Established Member
Joined
27 Apr 2004
Messages
264
Reaction score
0
Location
Still trying to get the 'woodshack' watertight in
Well Aragorn and Philly, it looks like you guys are the 'pioneers of Patina' so we all must follow. I too had never heard of it until now, but it sounds good, and a bonus for us with 'ankle-biters' whereby the furniture needs a tough, resistant finish. It's on my next shopping list!! :wink:
Thanks for the advice. 8)

Ta muchly

Gary
 

Bean

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2004
Messages
1,518
Reaction score
0
Location
scouting about
Aragorn
Sorry to be late been away :shock:
I have and continue to use Patina. I typically use 4 to 5 coats on a table top, I have a small coffee table which has survived my girls for the last 3 years. I have also used it on some internal doors only 2 coats but they come up a treat.
I have rubbed the finish down in between coats with garnet paper just to take off the napp.

In use i treat it like wax and rub in until its touch dry. Its sometimes hard work but worth it.

Bean
 

Aragorn

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2004
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Thanks Bean.
I've used Patina now on a few tabletops. I'm finding it to be a relatively easy finish to apply, though like you say, quite hard work rubbing it in over a large area.
It certainly is more resistant to most things than oil or varnish. I am applying 5-6 coats, rubbing down in between when it seems necessary and always rubbing out the final finish with 1200 grit paper to give a smooth finish.
Only drawback to me so far is the slightly too high gloss finish (which doesn't seem to rub out that well) and the plastic quality of the finish.
I much prefer the look of an oil finish, but when protection and stain resistance is the priority, I will keep using it.

Does anyone have any ideas about applying a top coat of something that may give a better looking finish? I suppose whatever might be used will be the coat that is susceptible to water/heat/staining etc, thus negating the use of Patina underneath?
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Aragorn,

I tried rubbing out the top coat with wax applied with grey Webrax which took down the plasticky quite well, but I haven't tested it with heat etc. I assume that the Patina underneath would still do its job, but the wax would need redoing. I'll dig out the test piece I did, give it hell and then let you know how it did. :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Webrax. What Axminster likes to describe as a 3 dimensional abrasive :?

Well I utilised my tea break to put two identical mugs of Simulated Coffee TM (boiling water) on the waxed and unwaxed portions of a test piece of Patina'd oak ('bout 4 coats IRRC). Result - spot the difference. Ditto for pouring boiling water straight onto the wood. I'd say it's definitely worth giving the wax a go and see if it gives more of the look you want, 'cos you certainly don't seem to lose the protection offered by Patina.

Cheers, Alf
 

Aragorn

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2004
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Many thanks ALF
Thanks great news. That plasticky look isn't too attractive over a large area.
BTW, what wax are you using?
 

Bean

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2004
Messages
1,518
Reaction score
0
Location
scouting about
Alf & Aragorn you seem to be on to a good theme here. Although I dont like the plasticky look of Patina I may give it a go with the wax and webrax (I dont believe that wax will mix with Garnet paper).
I have a console table to refinish (has been used for hot mugs) but I dont want a shiny plastic surface.
Aragorn let me know how it pans out.

Bean
 
Top