Outdoor table - nothing works!

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

farlsborough

Established Member
Joined
16 May 2021
Messages
23
Reaction score
17
Location
Leeds
We have a circular garden table that is allegedly teak, and when I first got it I put teak oil on it. Inevitably it looked good for a while but started to crack and peel, and to be honest I don’t love the gloss of teak oil anyway.

So, sanded down and put on Rubio hybrid wood protector. I’ve been pleased with Rubio monocoat before but either this is rubbish or I’ve done something wrong - barely seems to have changed the wood which a few weeks seems dry and vulnerable.

So, what advice for a low maintenance, hard-wearing finish that ideally soaks in/bonds rather than layering, as realistically I won’t remember to rub down and recoat every 6 months!
 

Orraloon

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2016
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
489
Location
Blue mountains Australia
Doug 71 is on the right track. There is no maintenance free product I know of that will protect wood out in the elements long term. Ask any boat owner why he scrapes back the varnish every year. The best of the bunch are outdoor furniture oils and the easiest to reapply but it needs doing at least every year. The sun does as much damage as the wet then there is mold and fungal growth so being out 24/7 is not ideal. Much better if it can be under cover when not in use.
Regards
John
 

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
2,384
Reaction score
1,473
Location
Sunny Glasgow
I've a bench to do and im using Afrormosia for the slats. I wont be putting a finish on because its the type of timber that is resistant to such things being so resinous.

From my Handbook of hardwoods under 'Durability and preservation' its listing as -
Insect attack - Reported highly resistant to termites in west Africa.
Durability of heartwood - Very durable.
Preservative treatment - Extremely resistant.
What that all means, especially the last one is it wont absorb finishes without first having surface oils removed by a solvent.
Its known as the African teak, so will share properties with teak.

Under the last two on Durability and Preservation, Teak is the same,-very durable/extremely resistant, so to get a finish onto it you will probably need to strip the oils and resins out it first with a good scrub of solvent.

Keeping in mind what these timbers wil be used for in their home countries, namely boat building. It will be subject to extremes of weather, salt water and a baking equatorial sun and it will go on for years if not decades under these conditions. So I think the UK weather is more a holiday camp in comparison, and without a finish it should last you decades.

My slats are going to be 38mm thick, basically as thats what they are and theres no point thicknessing them into sawdust. At that they'll probably outlast me, and likely whomever inherits it :LOL:
 
Last edited:

clogs

just can't decide
Joined
24 Jul 2020
Messages
1,634
Reaction score
915
Location
Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
Sikkens make several products that work well.....not cheap tho....
I use it on all outside furniture and hard wood windows......
when refinish time comes around I just scrub a bit with green Scotchbrite and paint it again....
the stuff soaks in with no probs and gives a good finish for at least 5 years....
 

sawtooth-9

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2015
Messages
369
Reaction score
208
Location
Bellingen Australia
We have a circular garden table that is allegedly teak, and when I first got it I put teak oil on it. Inevitably it looked good for a while but started to crack and peel, and to be honest I don’t love the gloss of teak oil anyway.

So, sanded down and put on Rubio hybrid wood protector. I’ve been pleased with Rubio monocoat before but either this is rubbish or I’ve done something wrong - barely seems to have changed the wood which a few weeks seems dry and vulnerable.

So, what advice for a low maintenance, hard-wearing finish that ideally soaks in/bonds rather than layering, as realistically I won’t remember to rub down and recoat every 6 months!
Just go to a ship chandler - they have an acid based teak scrub.
There are products that work a treat on restoring teak
I had a small yacht with 1 1/2 inch laid teak decks which had not been maintained for many years. Came up a treat, and just required oiling each year
 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
3,055
Reaction score
1,752
Location
Bradford
A trick used by boat restorers is to epoxy the wood first and then varnish.

The epoxy seals and stabilizes the surface whilst the varnish protects the epoxy from UV light.
 
Top