Outdoor bench slats recommendation

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John Brown

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I don't know if it helps, but there's a seller on eBay called feuillusfencing2010 who often has bench slats in various timbers.
I have no connection with them, just happens to be in my list of saved sellers.
 

TheTiddles

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Oak doesn’t last that well, especially in thinner sections it seems a bit disappointing in that respect. Cedar apparently does better, though much softer so if your bench has thin slats it might be a bit too wobbly, mine had huge thick iroko or meranti or similar which had partially rotted so I replaced with cedar (whilst also shortening it considerably), though it’s only done a few years there’s no signs of rot yet. I’d have used sweet chestnut if I could have gotten it
 

TheTiddles

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Oh, and find a local refinishing shop, they can grit-blast and paint with 2-pac for less than you can buy hammerite, especially if you want the same colour as whatever bit of tractor they’re doing next
 

Jacob

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Bench outside for 3 years with cast iron ends and anonymous reclaimed hardwood slats. Just had 2nd coat of linseed oil paint and as good as new.
150 yr old softwood handrails reclaimed from inside, now outside. Linseed oil paint every other year. Look as good as new.
 

YoungSalt

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I've been told iroko but no one has it in stock round here. Would oak be suitable and if so (I don't know if this is a silly question) but what moisture content does it has to be for outdoors
Virgin Forest Burma Teak would be best, then probably Iroko? Where abouts are you? I have both in stock if it helps? If you do decide to go down the oak path, you really want air dried English oak or at least european air died oak. Kiln dried american oak simply won’t last
 

Jacob

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Forgot to say - linseed oil paints goes on cast iron easier and lasts longer than Hammerite. No need for electolysis or to treat or prime the metal just wire brush off old loose paint and wash down.
I've used cornflour blue on the bench wood and cast iron and black on our cast iron gates and fancy front-door hinges. The black is not glossy at all but weathers really well. Tried hammerite years back but started lifting at edges.
 

Mike.R

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I think the trick is to put wooden garden furniture away undercover in October and not to bring it out until May. Only then will it have half a chance of lasting more than 10 years.

Iroko or teak will fare better than oak but if you do use oak, perhaps take a leaf out of Gaze Burville's book and fume the timber with ammonia and allow the piece to start the ageing process with dignity.


Oil on oak, whether it's Danish, Tung or an Osmo product, will last one season at best and will require regular maintenance in springtime and autumn.
 

tsb

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Virgin Forest Burma Teak would be best, then probably Iroko? Where abouts are you? I have both in stock if it helps? If you do decide to go down the oak path, you really want air dried English oak or at least european air died oak. Kiln dried american oak simply won’t last
Thanks for the kind offer but too far away as I'm up in Lancashire. I'll try another merchant/manufacturer tomorrow (I sure they make windows) and if no joy, it's going to be oak
 
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