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Osmo polyx

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flh801978

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I’ve used it on oak and American black walnut MDf and can’t tell the difference between the mdf and solid wood
Ian
 

custard

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Depends on the veneer, I wouldn't use it on something like Maple or Sycamore but I'd be fine with Black Walnut.
 

will_joiner

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Thanks for the reply’s. It will be beech veneered mdf with 2mm beech edging, just wondering if anyone has had any problems with the oil affecting the glue on the veneer or edging?
 

Kieran62

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I used it on some beech veneered MDF tables I built for a shop.
All of the edges were mitred so I can't offer any insight into the effect on the edging, but the veneered surfaces all worked well, with a consistent sheen level and no lifting of the veneer itself.
HTH
Kieran
 

custard

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will_joiner":1qy5b4sl said:
just wondering if anyone has had any problems with the oil affecting the glue on the veneer or edging?
It's not the oil affecting the glue, it's the glue affecting the oil. Here's what I mean.

The veneers you're dealing with here are about 0.6mm thick, then they're finish sanded which will bring them down to about 0.4mm or 0.5mm. The glue used to lay the veneers is a UF glue, which is pretty impervious to any finish. But on some timbers, Sycamore being a prime example, the glue tends to wick through the veneer so in patches it will be barely below the surface. When the oil hits these patches it can't penetrate as much as in surrounding areas, so the result looks blotchy.

It's onely a problem with certain timbers, the good news is Beech isn't one of them so you should be fine.
 

riclepp

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Hi Custard

Just noted your reply in this thread. You mention that some veneers are too thin and the species. I am reveneering a table with 1.5mm cherry veneer, is this one of the species that would be safe with osmo poly?


Cheers

Richard
 

custard

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I've never had any problems with American Cherry veneer, either 0.5/0.6mm commercial Cherry veneer, or thicker highly figured Cherry veneers that I've made myself on the bandsaw.

However, I'm intrigued by your comment that your veneer is 1.5mm thick. That's an odd thickness, too thick for commercial veneer but not quite thick enough for constructional veneer.

There is a general consensus that the maximum thickness for veneers that are to be laid on a man made ground is in the range 1.0-1.5mm. However, to go up to 1.5mm you need a moderately soft timber like Cherry, if you tried 1.5mm with say Rosewood you'd be running the risk of micro fracturing spoiling the result.

One other point, many finishers don't like old based finishes on Cherry because of blotching. Personally I'm less concerned because Cherry patinated really quickly, especially given some sunlight. So give the piece four to six months in a south facing room and, even if there was an initial trace of blotching, it'll quickly become invisible.
 

Deadeye

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Blimey custard. You know absolutely *tons* of stuff. I wish I could download you into my head! It's brilliant that you help weekend warriors like me. Thank yiu
 

LancsRick

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He's the first electronic woodworking encyclopedia to pass the Turing test you know..
 
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