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"One of a Kind"..Custom Fretwork Frames

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Lin

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Gill had ask that I post pics of the "Custom Frames" that I do. They are all one of a kind...due to the pics, names and dates. I have cut 6 different patterns. Customers supply the pics. These take me approx three weeks to cut one of them due to my JOB taking up most of my scrolling time.. :(
A wonderful man in Canada that goes by the handle "T-Bear" makes the patterns to my specs. I just add the lettering as needed. I'm posting the most popular one first. I've been cutting these frames for about two years now...and they have put a new 14" bandsaw and just recently a 22" drum sander in my shop....Boy do "I love these frames"...
I will post the other three in other post for those on dial up....
Any questions....ask away..
Lin


 

trevtheturner

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Lin,

Sorry I got Cruiser mixed up in the 'Biker' thread :oops: - but it was late at night! Having seen the cuttings of your daughter, and the horse so far, I was just wondering whether you had done one of Cruiser, that's all, 'cos they are my favourite dogs.

Cheers,

Trev.
 

Lin

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Trev. I used to have an "English Shepard" many years ago.....boy he was a great dog.....extremely smart. Full of personalty. No as of yet I haven't done a cutting of a shepard. If you ever get into trying out the scrollsaw......doing up a pattern of your dog from a pic is something I could do. Animals are not hard patterns to make from a good pic....When I do people it takes me much more time. I tend to get real picking aobut the details.....wanting them to match the pic as close as I can get. No clothes on the animals.....lol.....makes is easier.
Boy I wish there were some of you guys and gals out there that want to try out the scrolllsaw. Between Gill and I we can help stop all the mistakes we made...teaching ourselves....makes it a lot easier when you have help. The scrollsaw is easy to get the hang off. And results are produce very rapidly....You saw the cutting of my daughter. I made the pattern and cut 9 months after getting my saw. If I hadn't made the pattern the cutting would've been done three months sooner....and that cutting was a hard one.
Let me know if you decide to try this "Scrollsaw Stuff" out.....would really enjoy working with you on it and others here on this board.
Here's a cutting of one of the "Puppies" I have made a pattern for and cut. This is my brothers Yorkie.....Patty Sue.....She is his flying buddy. He flys a small plane and she loves to ride along. If have made a couple other patterns for other scrollers of thier dogs but have not cut many myself.
Lin
 

Gill

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Lin's right - scrolling is much easier than it looks and I'd love to see more of you guys dust off your saws. I know there are a few out there!

Trev - If you ever decide to have a go at a German Shepherd project, I could send you a copy of the pattern that I used to make my avatar. It's quite suitable for both scrolling and marquetry.

Gill
 

Lin

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Gill and Trev, Your avatar "Shepard" wouold be a great first or second try on the saw with 1/2" or 3/4" wood. Not a lot of interior cuts. Helps to not have lots of holes till you get the hang of it. And best of all.....the outer part is not a cirlce.....I have found circles, ovals and a perfectly straght line is the hardest to do.....give me wavy and I can rock and roll...lol
Lin
 

trevtheturner

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Thank you both, Gill and Lin, for your generous offers.

Okay, okay, if I do decide to have a go at this obviously the first thing I will need is a scrollsaw (and loadsa blades!) - s'pose one more saw won't hurt! So, do I go for a cheapie from one of the DIY sheds, or something better, e.g. a Hegner. I do now tend to go for quality, rather than false economy, which would probably mean having to save up a bit. And are other specialist tools needed - like to know what I might be getting into, see. Your advice and guidance will be much appreciated.

Oh, and this is our dog, Lin. She is our fourth of this breed and is six years old:



Cheers,

Trev.
 

SlimShavings

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Lin
Very very nice, do you sell the patterns. Maybe you should quit your day job and start teaching scroll there in michigan. Have you ever submitted them to ScrollWork Magazine.?
 

Lin

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Trev, Your puppy is just beautiful. She has a look of "what now Dad?"
She obivously doesn't mind having her picture taking. She would make a wonderful portrait.
Now on to the subject of what saw to buy......If you have the tendency to only plan to buy once..then if you can get the Hegner...others in that class would be the Excalibur, Eclipse, and the RBI Hawk. There are two other mid priced saws out there that do a very good job. The Dewalt 788..but I have heard some have scrolled it to death after about five years...The other is made by Delta. It is called the P-20. It is considered and industrial saw like the higher prieced ones. The P-20, Dewalt, Excalibur, and the G4 Hawk can all be top fed. Don't get into thinkng you have to top feed a scrollsaw though. My first saw was the 20" Rbi Hawk and it is a bottom feeder. That is how I learned to scroll bottom feeding (you put the blade thru the hole from the bottom of the project) and most all of the saws on the market on lower price end are fed that way. I do now also have the 26" G4 Hawk....I can top feed with it but tend to bottom feed after doing so long an am faster at it. Yes you will need blades and some type of spray adhesive for attaching the patterns. A way to drill the holes are a must also. Sandpaper and/or palm or orbital sanders are also needed. Other than that you just need wood and patterns which Gill and I can help you with..We make them and know of lots of sites that offer them free.
You have no idea how much fun you're going to have....The scrollsaw is one of the safest tools....My grandchildren have made a thing or two on mine when they visit. Just playing around cutting lines. They are 12 years old and the little one is 7. She doesn't like it much since a blade broke while she was cutting but the 12 year old says its "Neat"
Let us know what you decide and ask Gill for more info on which type of saws are availble in your neck of the woods.
What to look for when you shop for a saw. You want varible speed. and you want to be able to use pinless blades. Low to no vibration. Try to purchase a saw that you do not have to have any tools to change the blades. Some of the low priced saws have you using an allen wrench to change a blade and some you have to readjust your tension every time. When you get to the point of cutting some thing with 50 or so drilled holes in it...ease of blade change makes a big difference. I'm going to look for more info for you online. I have seen comparisions between saws somewhere. I have scrolled on a smaller Delta (not the P-20), a Dewalt and my Hawks. The little Delta had a lot of vibration to it at the higher speeds but for a fairly cheap (Around $200.00 I think) saw I was surprised at how easily I adapted to using it. The Dewalt.I had no problems with after I was show how to hook the blade up. Nice cutting machine but in truth..I love my Hawks. They are my pride and joy
Lin
 

Gill

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That's a gorgeous dog, Trev. She's almost an identical, albeit younger, version of mine.

I'm loathe to suggest which saw would be best for you because my own experience is really limited to Hegners. I've tried others at shows but I can't claim a great knowledge. I've read very positive reviews of the Delta 40-540 (I believe Hobbies of Dereham sell these - no doubt other retailers as well) and rather poorer ones of the Rexons and SIPs that seem to be so abundant.

I know you're keen to save money in the long run by getting a good saw from the outset, but there's something to be said for trying a cheap saw such as the Ferm FFZ400 from Screwfix. At £38.99 it'll give you an insight into scrolling and you'll have more idea of what features will meet your requirements if you decide to upgrade later. I started off with a little Spiralux that was operated magnetically and could only cut ply less than 1/4" thick. It also vibrated dreadfully but at least it convinced me that I could get a lot of fun out of scrolling.

One additional thought is that you'll need a drillpress capable of accepting very fine bits in order to drill holes for your blades when you make internal cuts.

Gill
 

Lin

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Slim, I have sold a few patterns but mostly give them away to other scrollers that want what I do. I'm not a great designer...I just puddle along. I have sumitted a couple of my ideas to ScrollSawWorkshop and had one article published in the Fall issue 2004. I have other ideas but getting them from the brain into the puter is not always an easy task...Time keeps me from doing more. I sometimes wish I could do this for a living but afraid it would become a JOB and not be quite so much fun as is is now....Doubt if I could produce fast enough to cover the wages I make a my JOB either. I do enjoy scrolling and now the lathe is quick becoming a lot of fun also.
how about you digging out your Dewalt scrollsaw and giving us a sneak preview of what it will do?
Lin
 

SlimShavings

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Lin
I sure would like to get the dewalt out. I hae an idea to inlay some scroll work into some doors. But I would need a years practice to be any good. Right now aroune here making a living is 24/7. Thanks to the illegals and Walmart. When i get a job I have to get it done so to keep the customer happy. YOU know the Mickey D thing. I spend more time BS'n for work than actually doing it sometimes. And taking care of a homestead by yourself takes a lot of time.. Someday I will. maybe this winter till thenI will admire yours :oops: :D
 

Lin

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Slim, Boy do I understand the time thing.....But I do have to point out. It would not take years to be able to cut fretwork overlays. I was doing portrait style cutting (like "Patty Sue") about six months after my saw arrived. Many of those portrait are harder cuts than stack cutting overlays in hardwood. Just a bit of practice is all that is needed. A bit here and there and before you know it you are cutting intricate details that you never thought possible. Overlays in a contrasting wood on your cabinets would look awesome......and be a great selling point.
My total scrolling time at present from the time my saw arrived has been around 3.5 years. The only thing I haven't taken a shot at yet are the big fretwork clocks. Its' not the fretwork that deters me....its making all the pieces fit and time to do a three tier clock that I won't be able to sell for what it would be worth.
I do love your cabinets......Something I don't know how to do... yet...
Lin
 

SlimShavings

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Lin:)
Tell you what . When you start your first cabinet . Ill start my scroll saw up :eek:ccasion5: Would really like to do the scroll saw. But what I want to do is INLAY (not shouting) two scrolled eagles (like a cameo) looking at each other into the doors of this cabinet.



This one I finished last week but ended up staining it dark. Its walnut and figured poplar.
Started a couple new cabinets today and some christmas stuff. Put up 12 jars of dill and B&B pickles also. Garden doesn't wait :lol:
 

Gill

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That's a really cool piece of furniture, Slim. It reminds me of a planter's desk Norm made a few years ago, but yours has much more style.

So what's stopping you from inlaying a couple of eagles? It sounds quite straight forward, although my only practical experience is with hawks.



Let me know what sort of inlay you're trying to create and I'll try to accompany you through the process. Marquetry or scrolling, it's all wood to me :).

Gill (who's just put 10 jars of mango chutney into storage - only piccalilli to worry about later this autumn now :) )
 

SlimShavings

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Gill
Maybe youv'e seen in the "murican" scroll saw mags the leaf outlines with animals or birds in them. thats what I would like to put in the doors. i figure I would scroll everything but the outside of the leaf and then use the router and inlay collar to do the outside and put it in the door.. But I'm just gonna have to wait till I get some time and money ahead to spend the time at it. If your like me you would exchange the amount of compliments you get on your work for the money people are willing to pay. If compliments were money:)
I have another one cut out but with turned legs. A little fancier its all walnut with curly maple panels in the door. i thought the inlay would be good in cherry or walnut.
The desk in the picture is a plantation desk. It is from a drawing by Gotshall

Do you garden. And What is mango chutney and the other thing. MAybe you should just send some over. Never know what you might start. :)

Dave
 

Lin

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Gill, Love the Hawk......Such fine detail.....Wishing the pic was a bit larger.....
Slim, Hoping you can find the time and $$ to do the ovelays......sound like a plan to me and will add a personal touch to you cabinetry.....Now I want to see what you're talking about doing.
Lin
 

Lin

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Slim, Now I went back and saw the cabinet.......Talk about jumping the gun.with my post....lol ....You're right......eagles inlayed into the doors.......WOW......that would look awesome.......Just for your info...I have a sorta cabinet thing I have to do....Gotta build something to house one of our TVS and the video games and such in our "entertainment/computer" room. We had a console TV in there that died and bought another TV......Sitting on a very large box at then moment. So I will be building something for it to sit on with shelving for the gaming systems......I will let you know when I start....lol (that will count as a cabinet.....right?)
Lin
 

Gill

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Dave - Mango chutney is a condiment that we often serve with curries, together with other other condiments such as raita and breads like naan bread and poppadums. I suspect this might all sound rather peculiar to you, so I'll PM you with more details. Piccalilli is a selection of vegetables that are preserved in a spicy vinegar or a mustard sauce (again, heavy on vinegar) and is commonly served with cold meats. Many people have their own recipes and what one cook might describe as piccalilli may be completely different to the piccalilli made by another. I'm not a keen gardener, I'm just addicted to pickles and chutneys! Home-made tastes immeasurably superior to anything available commercially.

The process you've described for inlaying motifs into your work should work. If I understand you correctly, I should imagine you'll have to shape the basic outline of the inlay using a router inlay set, then use this as a template to make inlay blanks. Once you've got your blanks, you could stack cut whatever motif you choose on a scrollsaw and simply "bookleaf" them into place.

Lin - Thanks for the compliment about the hawk. It's a very old piece and much battered so I'm loathe to show too much detail on it :oops:. I've got one or two more old pictures hanging around, but they're also battered. If you don't mind seeing them with all their scars, I'll try to dig them out again (goodness knows where they are).

Gill
 
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