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Old, Really old, or new for starter table saw?

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Beanwood

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Hi all,

I've resisted posting this until now, as there seems to be a 'Which starter saw should I get' thread every couple of weeks. The general consensus appears to be 'Save some more and get a decent saw'

So, my question is, would an old Kity (618 advertised locally) be as good as a 'newer' Kity 419 (I've not seen one in my price bracket yet)
Similarly would an older Axminster BT10ST be better than say a new Ryobi 1526?

Things have moved on in technology over recent years, and I'm concerned that for my budget (ideally around £150 - could MAX at £200) I could go for a (30?) year old saw with a quality name (But possibly obsolete parts) that's actually not as good as a new DIY level machine.

And yes, I know I ought to save the cash and go for a new TS200C, but I've already pushed my budget from the £100 it was going to be for a second hand tool. :oops:

It won't be a hard life. I'd like to cut accurate angles (So probably after market mitre gauge or sled). I already have a chop saw. I don't need to cut 8x4's, (I can cut those with a hand circular saw, but would like to do 75mm thick.

Any ideas, beyond putting up a 'Wanted - good quality table saw - Bristol area for £150 - £200' and seeing what comes in?

So, in summary - for less than you usually recommend spending - very old, old or new?

Thanks for reading.
:wink:
 

marcros

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I dont think that the Kity 419 will cut 75mm deep. Kity stuff seem to be quite highly thought of- I have a 419 and am happy with it. I havent used other saws, so cant really compare. Spares can be pricey, but you shouldnt need a great deal- the ones that I have bought were missing parts when I got the saw. Keep an eye on ebay- I got a good deal on mine because it was listed as a "bench saw" rather than "Kity 419 table saw" etc. Luckily I recognised what it was from the poor pictures.
 

heimlaga

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It all depends on your metalworking and machinistry skills. An old professional quality saw will be the best buy prizewise but it will most likely require some repairs. A new cheap saw on the other hand will always feel cheap and flimsy and lack power but it will give you an easy start.
I suggest that you steer away from babbit bearings and line shaft drive and at least go for a modern saw with built in motor and guarded belts and ball bearings. The kind of saw that became common after the second world war. It should also have a proper riving knife and it should be possible to install an overarm guard on it. Those factors give a timeframe from roundabout 1950 to present. Within that time frame very little has happened in table saw design and a secondhand one would technically be just as up to date as a new one. It is your choice.

Myself I have a 60 years old combination machine and do not regret buying it.
 

Beanwood

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Thanks both for your comments.

marcros":2ev14ql1 said:
Keep an eye on ebay- I got a good deal on mine because it was listed as a "bench saw" rather than "Kity 419 table saw" etc. Luckily I recognised what it was from the poor pictures.
I keep poring over any likely ad - it's amazing they don't come up when you have the cash available :|

heimlaga":2ev14ql1 said:
Myself I have a 60 years old combination machine and do not regret buying it.
That's good to hear. I IMAGINE quality older machines would always feel nicer.

I'll keep looking with an open mind.
 

kirkpoore1

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What do you count as "old"? I mean, my table saw was built in 1959 and other than being a little primitive on the dust collection side it's as good as any cabinet-type saw built now. Heck, in some ways it's certainly better. I consider it "middle aged". For me, old starts in the 1930's, and really old is babbitt bearing stuff (pre-1920).

But then again, the newest machine in my shop was probably built in the late 1960's.

Kirk
 

tool613

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Many make the mistake of comparing new models to old. There is that perception that old is broken or in need of rebuilding. If one is only looking at consumer grade saws than i would say new is better.

What one need to do is compare what kind of saws we are getting for the price point. Most consumer grade saw are good for 10 to 20 years. they are often weak in HP and as we out grow them they get over worked. Industrial saws on the other hand are built to withstand decades of commercial use. this type of saw would be out of our reach had we to by them new.

I guess most of us after old ARN are on the lookout for used old tools. It is a great way of getting high quality tools at a reasonable price. We say: “What a good standard of quality they used to maintain in the old days”. This is a little deceptive since all the bad stuff has been trashed a long time ago leaving many good quality tools to us. IOW the junk has been weeded out.

most of the great machines i see are going in the garbage and being melted down for fry pans. I hope to move people to save as much as they can in any way there can. The best part is its a lot fun bring these old fine machinery back to work. the joy of cutting wood on a finely tuned 70 year old wadkin PK that has been restored can not be equaled. it does one thing that is so missing in this world. it shows us that not all things need to be improved. many thing have been lost b/c they where seen as useless. we have all been tricked into the idea that new is better.

As too a starter saw I would say most will go new just b/c they want to work wood and not machines. For me the rewards of fixing up older machines is why i like older. And its the 50s that i look too. The 50s IMHO was the zenith of woodworking machines quality.

Jack
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