Oddball Union Jubilee lathe

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parvum

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Hello all,I have refurbished a couple of Union Jubilee lathes, but my latest acquisition has me puzzled. It is clearly labelled Union Jubilee, but it has four speeds 425, 790, 1330 and2250 driven via a large diameter spindle on huge adjustable taper roller bearings with 11/2 x 6 threads on both ends, with a six inch height over the bed. Not the 1x10 threads I have seen before on previous projects on a much smaller diameter spindle supported on much smaller ball races with a fixed setting. I understand that Harrison made one off lathes for specific customers, but this one is supposed to have come from a school near Oxford and was festooned with safety switches. Does anyone have any ideas as to the ancestory and derivation of this machine, it seems to share some of the characteristics of a Graduate. Thanks in advance to any reponders.
Paul
 

parvum

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Sorry Mark It is all in bits, but overall its external appearance is exactly Union Jubilee, other than the height over the bed ! It does not have the enclosed motor housing of a Graduate or the domed top of the headstock, it has the pressed steel legs I have seen on other Jubilees, with a square top/lid to the headstock.
Stet fortuna domus
regards Paul
 

minilathe22

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Is it possible someone made a custom lathe themselves? I think the Union Jubilee is normally 5" centre height, so is the tailstock adapted or from some other lathe aswell?
 

KingAether

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" Introduced in the late 1930s and shown in catalogues for that era (and not, as widely supposed, in 1948 for the Golden Jubilee of the Harrison Company ) the "Union" Jubilee wood-turning lathe had a 5-inch centre height and was available in versions offering 30", 42" and later 54" between centres. For a short time during the mid-1950s, the lathe could also be had in what was described by the makers as a "heavy-duty" version with the centre height increased to 6 inches, the spindle fitted with a 1.5" x 6 t.p.i. nose, bored through 0.5 inches and running in Timken taper-roller bearings. "
 

parvum

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Thanks King Aether That seems to be the answer! I am obliged, your majesty.
regards Paul
 

DW54VER

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Hello all,I have refurbished a couple of Union Jubilee lathes, but my latest acquisition has me puzzled. It is clearly labelled Union Jubilee, but it has four speeds 425, 790, 1330 and2250 driven via a large diameter spindle on huge adjustable taper roller bearings with 11/2 x 6 threads on both ends, with a six inch height over the bed. Not the 1x10 threads I have seen before on previous projects on a much smaller diameter spindle supported on much smaller ball races with a fixed setting. I understand that Harrison made one off lathes for specific customers, but this one is supposed to have come from a school near Oxford and was festooned with safety switches. Does anyone have any ideas as to the ancestory and derivation of this machine, it seems to share some of the characteristics of a Graduate. Thanks in advance to any reponders.
Paul

hey, how bizarre, I bought a Union Jubilee lathe from a School in Staffordshire 5-6 weeks ago and it fits the same description of the motor/pulley housing with a flat lid.

unfortunately, mine didn’t arrive with a Tailstock, banjo or tool rests but it did come with 4 very heavy solid steel faceplates for the Graduate.

I am still searching for these parts so if you or anyone else reading this has any spare then please drop me a line.

best wishes,
David
 

Retire2004

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Hi Paul, sorry for the late response. Yes, I too aquired one of these some years ago. I believe it came from the repair shop of a merchant ship and was originally supplied by John Hall Tools Ltd. As you say, it has the characteristics and capacity of a Graduate but with steel headstock, Timken bearings etc. Mine also had a carriage assembly with rack along the bedways, however the apron plate and pinion were missing. I overcame this problem by fitting a lever operated mechanism for longitudinal movement. I swapped the bed, tailstock and carriage with my existing Graduate and also modified the tailstock and banjo to make them quick-release for easy movement when using the carriage. I plan to use the "Jubilee" headstock to build a heavy duty bowl lathe. It is currently in my local "Men's Shed" and can't access it until we resume after lockdown.
Regards, Tudor
 

DW54VER

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Hi Paul, sorry for the late response. Yes, I too aquired one of these some years ago. I believe it came from the repair shop of a merchant ship and was originally supplied by John Hall Tools Ltd. As you say, it has the characteristics and capacity of a Graduate but with steel headstock, Timken bearings etc. Mine also had a carriage assembly with rack along the bedways, however the apron plate and pinion were missing. I overcame this problem by fitting a lever operated mechanism for longitudinal movement. I swapped the bed, tailstock and carriage with my existing Graduate and also modified the tailstock and banjo to make them quick-release for easy movement when using the carriage. I plan to use the "Jubilee" headstock to build a heavy duty bowl lathe. It is currently in my local "Men's Shed" and can't access it until we resume after lockdown.
Regards, Tudor
Sounds like fun 😁
 

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