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Oak newel post to Oak handrail, which glue?

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basssound

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Righto I'm about to fit my oak newel posts and handrails using loose oak tenons but I'm unsure which glue to use.
I'll be taking my time cutting the joint so hopefully no gaps, I'm also thinking of cutting the underneath out on the handrails to slide them in from above with the bottom post pulled over a little to allow everything to come together.

Which glue would be best as I'll so be using the odd screw to pull it all tight.
The oak will be finished with Osmo oil just to protect the surface.
 

ColeyS1

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I've only ever draw bored handrails to newel posts


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Trevanion

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I like to use PU because as BM101 said, I'm usually trying to get it done as fast as bloody possible! :lol:

If your joints are nice and tight and you can work quickly enough and get it all together before the glue starts setting within 5 minutes PU is an excellent choice as it's super strong and you can get back to working on the project after an hour or two once the glue's gone hard. It can make a mess since it does foam up and it's best to simply leave it until it dries and scrape it off with a chisel, something I've noticed is I never get glue marks with PU glue like you get with most other glues, even if it's been dripping down the newel posts like snot, it scrapes off and just sand it and you've got a very good finishable surface.

Alternatively, if you don't think you can get it together quick enough or you just want to take your time you can't really beat ordinary D3/D4 PVA glue or Cascamite. I'd possibly prefer to use a PVA/Cascamite over PU in your case because of the loose tenons, but once you've got a screw in either end it should be solid enough to stand on if you're brave enough :wink:
 

ColeyS1

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Pu glue is rapid and strong, but what about longterm?


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ColeyS1

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My glue experience in terms of strength durability is epoxy, titebond3, cascamite, ordinary white glue pva and then bodge it and scarper pu followed by the mitre mate offerings (excluding accoya)

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Doug71

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ColeyS1":1g5iqv9b said:
Pu glue is rapid and strong, but what about longterm?


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Yes, will be interesting to come back in 100yrs and see how the PU glue, Stixall etc has held up, there might be a lot of things falling apart in the next 50yrs #-o
 

Bm101

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Do you have doubts as to pu long term Coley
I mean, not country house long term but mdf loft staircase conversion type longterm.
 

Bm101

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Doug71":3nai014j said:
ColeyS1":3nai014j said:
Pu glue is rapid and strong, but what about longterm?


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Yes, will be interesting to come back in 100yrs and see how the PU glue, Stixall etc has held up, there might be a lot of things falling apart in the next 50yrs #-o
50 years will do for my staircase tbh.
 

Trevanion

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ColeyS1":3qh9a9pd said:
Pu glue is rapid and strong, but what about longterm?
I suppose the only answer to that question is, "We'll see". After a few years of using the stuff, I personally haven't had anything fail explicitly because of the glue itself, yet... I've seen some really shoddy craftsmanship bunged together with PU glue and they've seemed to have held up well despite being absolutely abysmal structurally, so I'm hoping with good and proper traditional joinery with snug-fitting joints the glue should last at least the life-span of the wood itself. I can't guarantee it will last, but I do have some faith in it. If not, I'll gladly eat my hat in 50 years or less :)

I suppose the same could be said for most glues and adhesives though, how long will PVAs and Epoxies last? :-k

I have started wearing gloves more often with the stuff though, never know what it might be transferring into your body or what damage it's doing to your skin.
 
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