Oak door

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spanner48

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Fair enough; but that applies only to the exterior, since it's Grade 2.

Another thought: is it necessary entirely to renew the door? If not – if even heavy restoration/rebuilding the existing door will suffice, that becomes "Maintenance" rather than "New Work". And therefore not needing Listed Building Consent.
 

Hpps

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Fair enough; but that applies only to the exterior, since it's Grade 2.

Another thought: is it necessary entirely to renew the door? If not – if even heavy restoration/rebuilding the existing door will suffice, that becomes "Maintenance" rather than "New Work". And therefore not needing Listed Building Consent.
Unfortunately the door needs replacing as it's currently got a nice 1980's interpretation of a country cottage door 🙄
 

sawtooth-9

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Let's start at the beginning: there s no "need to be changed". The Conservation Officer CANNOT order you do do anything to an existing building, whether listed or not, except in the case of a Dereliction Order. I'm assuming the house is not so derelict as to be the subject of that.

Once you've got that clear, and explained to the Conservation Officer the limits to her powers, you can discuss the door.

Yes, replacing it will need Listed Building Consent - as will anything else external [if it's Grade 2, anything internal should be outwith LBC control]. But it should not need to be oak. Most Georgian doors were painted, and made of Baltic Pine. So it's important to make a distinction between what the CO wants, and what she has the right to rule on. Conservation Officers are frequently maximalists, who try to impose their peculiar views on everything. If in doubt, find out who your Ward Councillor is, and get him/her involved. Ultimately, if you cannot get a reasonable response from the CO, you can ask your Councillor to have the LBC Application "called-in" to the Council's Planning Committee, for the elected Councillors to decide. And you get your chance to stand up in committe and convince them.
Whilst there are some good reasons for conservation restrictions, there are too many interfering " do gooders " who actually do not know what they are doing.
God save us from council planners here and in UK
 

Doug71

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It's always best if you can keep the Conservation Officer onside, most of the ones I have come across have been fine. I have found as long as you do things traditionally and sympathetic to the building it should run smoothly.
 

Hpps

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What are peoples thoughts on Accoya for external doors? As already mentioned, it'll be painted, so it's not that the conservation officer is wanting the look of exposed oak. I'm going to talk to them and see if I can get them to be a bit more open minded.
 

Ollie78

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Accoya is great for painted stuff, it doesn't hardly move at all, so the paint lasts well.
It comes off the planer and moulder nicely but it doesn't like a hand plane much, needs to be very sharp.

The dust is static and will stick everywhere and your workshop will smell like salt and viniger crisps.

Ollie
 
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davethebb

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Hpps, Firstly as a long-term owner of a Grade II property and with extensive experience dealing with the authorities, I would strongly recommend that you join the Listed Property Owners Club (LPOC). This will give you a great resource for advice etc.

This Grd II listing covers both inside and out and also the garden to the extent of the property curtilage (we have recently had to deal with this in our recent planning application for our workshop). In simple terms it regards the change of character e.g. you must maintain the character and the material used. at the time it was listed. It is important to understand when the property was listed and if you can find out with exvidence what the front door design was - you can use this as part of your LBC application which you will need to do -particularly as you have already discussed this with the CO as they may well check at a later date. If you can not find out details of the original door then you may have to go with the CO recommendation.

It is best to keep the CO on your side if you have extensive works to undertake and try and make him your best friend.......
 

davethebb

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Thanks Steve. After spending almost year obtaining planning permission (LBC withdrawn as it technically fell out of the Grd II curtilage), you will see I am building a workshop in my garden - there is a thread in the workshop build forum.
 
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