Oak door

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Hpps

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We are just about to buy a grade 2 listed farm house, but as expected it comes with some things that we've been told need to be changed, one of which is the front door.
The conservation officer as stated that it should be an oak 6 panel Georgian style with glazed to panels. Admittedly it will be an improvement on whats currently there, and I plan to make it myself.

My question is, due to it being an external door, once I've purchased the timber, can I just get started and make it straight away, or would the timber need to sit in my workshop for a while first? What moisture content should I be aiming for on an external door?
 

Doug71

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I would say if you buy kiln dried Oak from Arnold Laver or somewhere you could just crack on and get it made.

External doors are always a tough one as obviously one side is inside and one side is outside so depending on the conditions the moisture content of the two faces of the door can be different which leads to it bowing.

I think kiln dried Oak would be supplied around 12% MC which is too wet for inside and too dry for outside so about right for an external door.

As idyllic as Oak sounds it's not the ideal timber for a front door, even the firms that make high end bespoke ones generally recommend some kind of canopy to keep the weather off them.

If it's going to be painted I would be looking at Accoya.
 

Jameshow

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Is oak the best wood it does seem to move alot?

Nothing UK grown that's more stable??
 

Ollie78

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I am about to make an Oak front door and frame as well. Currently trying to decide on getting kiln dried of good quality like I use for furniture or air dried which does not appear to be the same quality.
As an added complication I also need to make 2 gates (more like doors really ) so was going to get air dried for that but had a look at some and it was a bit ropey and not much cheaper than the good stuff.

To add to the problem is the finishing, mine will be oiled so I will probably use Owatrol textrol.
If yours is to be painted maybe you could get away with Accoya which I like for panelled doors. I am sure they won't make you drill a hole in it to prove its oak.

Good luck.

Ollie
 

DBC

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I probably make between 5 and 10 front doors for customers each year. I use kiln dried timber which I buy from the timber merchant to begin milling and joining that same day and haven’t had any problems. I used to make them predominantly of oak but over the past few years I have been experimenting with other species as long as the customer approves. For example, in the street I live in is a Red Grandis door, a Utile door and 3 oak doors - all identical as it’s a conservation area - that I made and installed over the past 5-10 years and they all seem to be weathering identically well. There is also a pine door at number 16 I made for a landlord on a budget about 15 years ago and this still looks good too but I had to go back to ease this one a few months after I installed it. Unlike a lot of landlords he does keep on top of the painting to his credit.

Please note ours is an ‘L’ shaped street and only the utile door is facing full on into the prevailing weather at the intersection of the ‘L’; the others are side on. We are not permitted to have canopies in this area either.
 
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spanner48

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We are just about to buy a grade 2 listed farm house, but as expected it comes with some things that we've been told need to be changed, one of which is the front door.
The conservation officer as stated that it should be an oak 6 panel Georgian style with glazed to panels. Admittedly it will be an improvement on whats currently there, and I plan to make it myself.

My question is, due to it being an external door, once I've purchased the timber, can I just get started and make it straight away, or would the timber need to sit in my workshop for a while first? What moisture content should I be aiming for on an external door?
Let's start at the beginning: there s no "need to be changed". The Conservation Officer CANNOT order you do do anything to an existing building, whether listed or not, except in the case of a Dereliction Order. I'm assuming the house is not so derelict as to be the subject of that.

Once you've got that clear, and explained to the Conservation Officer the limits to her powers, you can discuss the door.

Yes, replacing it will need Listed Building Consent - as will anything else external [if it's Grade 2, anything internal should be outwith LBC control]. But it should not need to be oak. Most Georgian doors were painted, and made of Baltic Pine. So it's important to make a distinction between what the CO wants, and what she has the right to rule on. Conservation Officers are frequently maximalists, who try to impose their peculiar views on everything. If in doubt, find out who your Ward Councillor is, and get him/her involved. Ultimately, if you cannot get a reasonable response from the CO, you can ask your Councillor to have the LBC Application "called-in" to the Council's Planning Committee, for the elected Councillors to decide. And you get your chance to stand up in committe and convince them.
 

Jacob

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We are just about to buy a grade 2 listed farm house, but as expected it comes with some things that we've been told need to be changed, one of which is the front door.
The conservation officer as stated that it should be an oak 6 panel Georgian style with glazed to panels. Admittedly it will be an improvement on whats currently there, and I plan to make it myself.

My question is, due to it being an external door, once I've purchased the timber, can I just get started and make it straight away, or would the timber need to sit in my workshop for a while first? What moisture content should I be aiming for on an external door?
6 panel Georgian door not likely to be oak. Almost always redwood or other good quality softwood. Painted or wood effect varnish.
 

TobyT

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Let's start at the beginning: there s no "need to be changed". The Conservation Officer CANNOT order you do do anything to an existing building, whether listed or not, except in the case of a Dereliction Order. I'm assuming the house is not so derelict as to be the subject of that.

Once you've got that clear, and explained to the Conservation Officer the limits to her powers, you can discuss the door.

Yes, replacing it will need Listed Building Consent - as will anything else external [if it's Grade 2, anything internal should be outwith LBC control]. But it should not need to be oak. Most Georgian doors were painted, and made of Baltic Pine. So it's important to make a distinction between what the CO wants, and what she has the right to rule on. Conservation Officers are frequently maximalists, who try to impose their peculiar views on everything. If in doubt, find out who your Ward Councillor is, and get him/her involved. Ultimately, if you cannot get a reasonable response from the CO, you can ask your Councillor to have the LBC Application "called-in" to the Council's Planning Committee, for the elected Councillors to decide. And you get your chance to stand up in committe and convince them.
In addition you need to be sure what the listing covers. It may only cover certain aspects of the building.
 

Fidget

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This is how the stiles to my new front door were made (not by me) No movement in 4 years

20220524_115153.jpg
 

Hpps

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