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Oak Dining Table

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Bean

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Hi all
I am about to finish a solid oak table top......I am thinking of using a couple of coats of Sprit Based Sanding Sealer followed by Clear Briwax. Has anyone any suggestions to improve the finish.


Bean
 

trevtheturner

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Hi, Bean,

Sounds good to me, providing the top is to be maintained by wax polishing to keep the finish on it.

An alternative could be to use pure tung oil, or another finishing oil - a few coats, cutting back between coats to build a finish. This would provide a somewhat less glossy finish.

Suggest the time taken to try the options on test pieces first might be time well spent.

Table sounds good! Good luck.

Trev.
 

Gill

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Hi Bean

I think I'd rather plump for a water based sanding sealer because I tend to worry about the difficulties in getting a decent finish to bond to a spirit based primer unless it is also spirit based. You'll probably get good results going along your proposed route, but it might be worth reading the small print on the back of the tins first to check for possible incompatibility.

How are you going to apply the finish? Oak can stain badly when it's brought into contact with wire wool, so if you're going to use an abrasive it's probably best to select something nylon.

Finally, it's important to think about the usage that the table will be put to. A wax finish might look great on a reception room side table that is primarily a display piece; unfortunately, it wouldn't last five minutes on a dining table or a kitchen table.

Yours

Gill
 

Alf

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Bean,

After some rigorous testing (That's a DAMHIKT in fact :oops: ), I'm not sure that sanding sealer and wax can really stand up to the slings and arrows that usually come the way of a table top, unless, as Gill says, it'll just be there to look beautiful. I think Trev may have something with the tung oil though. I had a long conflab with a pro finisher a while back, and although he used all sorts of crud for the paying work, he swore by pure tung oil for his own stuff. Said he'd done a butcher's block type kitchen trolley top with it years ago and it was still as tough as old boots. The only real drawback to it is time. Time between coats for it to dry, and the sheer time involved applying multiple coats. Very easy to wipe over a fresh coat at a later date though. I've used Liberon's finishing oil with some success on an occasional table, which does have some tung oil in it but dries considerably faster. My dad used it on all the pine doors in the house too, and it's standing up very well to daily life; a quick wipe over once a year or so and they come out looking like new. Definitely an option to consider. For real toughness then you want to go down the lacquer route. I've never used it myself -yet- but I understand it can be applied successfully by hand rather than sprayed. FWIW.

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Gill, good point about the steel wool. I always forget that potential hazard 'cos I never use it any more.
 

Signal

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One thing to note about the tung oil is its pong! :?

I quite like it reminds me of peanuts
but SWMBO thinks it smells like sick :shock:

Signal
 

Bean

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Thanks all
I am going out to the shop to try some alternatives :D
I think I may have some Tung Oil seems to ring a bell, I might even have some linseed Oil.

Let the fun begin :D :D :D :D

Bean
 

Aragorn

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If you go for an oil finish instead of the lacquer, make sure to leave it to cure for several days after the final coat before you let the kids at it with their crayons! Speaking from experience here! I recommend at least 5 oil coats and 3 days cure time for maximum durability - as it's a dining table it's going to get wiped down a lot I imagine. So better to be sure :wink:
 

Adam

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I've hand applied lacquer before - and it was successful. I used a sponge wrapped with a thin cloth, which soaks up laquer inside, and then when you pull the cloth tight, slowly releases the laquer out onto the wood.

Adam
 

Bean

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This table top is 2.7m by 1.1m, I am concerned that a lacquer will appear patchy.
I also (as informed by the :twisted: SWMBO :twisted: ) would like the top to look like wood with minimal darkening, it has to match other furniture in the room.

Any Ideas...................Still looking for the Tung Oil :roll:


Bean
 

Adam

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frank":wz47n38y said:
thats a good tip adam :D
Thanks, it's not mine, I learnt that when doing work experience at Senor Carmicheal workshops.

Adam
 

Philly

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Bean,
Last night I sprayed a side table with Chestnut's Melamine Laquer-that would be a perfect finish for your table top. The only downer is that you need to spray it really. It's not particularly good applied by brush. But if you can get hold of a cheap spray gun this is the finish for you. It is heat and water resistant, especially for table tops. But it isn't too thick or plasticy looking. It also doesn't turn yellow which is a bonus!
Below is a link to a picture of one of my bedside cabinets finished with this laquer. Sorry it's not the best of pictures, but it will give you an idea.

http://groups.msn.com/ukwoodworking/bed ... otoID=1185

Hope this is of help,
Philly
 

Bean

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Philly
Thanks for the advice :D

The Finish sounds just the ticket for a layer of defense agaist my two girls.

I'm not so sure about spraying though! I don't allways mix well with spray guns :oops: :?

Your Bedside Cabinets look good though thanks for the link !

Bean
 

Philly

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Bean,
Don't fear the spraygun!
I felt the same way, and when spraying still do! But this laquer is very forgiving. It doesn't look great when you apply it but as it dries its sinks in leaving a level surface. Makes me look like I know what i'm doing!
B+Q have a compressor/spraygun/nail gun combo on offer at the moment for £99-worth a go. And you get a nailgun to play with!!
cheers,
Philly
 
A

Anonymous

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Philly Its not the gun I fear but the SWMBO :twisted: who has put great store by this table.

I am continueing with trying finishing oils as I am looking for a natural finish with little darkening.........................Not sure if I will achive this with oil though :roll:

Bean
 

Bean

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:oops: Forgot to login last time
Liberons Finishing Oil looks like a winner :lol: Just waiting to see it in daylight before I get on.

Thank you to all Posters for thier advice on this problem 8)

I will post an inage of the table when finished


Bean
 
A

Anonymous

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I finished my oak dining table 3 years ago with (Bolloms) Melamine Lacquer and you don't have to spray it. I used a rag to apply and it works wonderfully. Best to thin the lacquer (with cellulose thinners) to ensure it doesn't go on too thick. The only downside is the stuff really stinks. Wear a mask that filters chemicals.

Actually, since then I usually apply lacquer with a good quality brush. Spraying is only really worth it for larger volumes.

As others have said, I REALLY recommend NOT using only wax finish. Wax won't tolerate heat, water or alcohol.

If you don't want to use smelly lacquer, I'd recommend oil.
 

Bean

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edwardh
I will try it on the next one. :shock: I have been asked if I would make a simular one for a neighbour :shock: :shock: for money :shock:

Now what lessons did I learn ??????????

Bean
 
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