Novice question for edge gluing boards

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Cabinetman

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This may be a heresy - so others can comment on the wisdom/feasibilty - but given the dimensions would it be possible to use kitchen worktop connector bolts.

Done on the underside they would not show if left in place, allows the wood lengths to be accurately aligned, trial clamping before gluing, bolts tightened gradually before glue dries.
Well I can see your reasoning Terry, simple enough though with biscuits to align the top surfaces and then just cramp it all up. With care and judicious planing of the surfaces prior to gluing, then good cleaning away of wet glue, the top is almost finished straight out of the cramps. Ian
 

Sgian Dubh

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... I have 5 boards (300cm x 11cm x 3cm) that I would like to join. While I've done an ok job of planing the edges ...
You might find the discussion about edge joinery for making wide panels out of solid wood boards at this link of some interest. Slainte.
 

Chris_Pallet

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Also it’s important to "cup and bridge " ie alternate the boards, which I’m not sure you have in that photo. Ian


I either didn't do this or didn't leave the wood to dry out enough.
As after about 2/3 months inside, the table bowed up on one corner. I even had to add a 1'+ leg foot extension lol.

I glued up all 5 boards at once with some big bessy clamps

My only advice is don't rush it, check grain, Check square and then check it all again.
Write a list of what to check before you glue it all together!

Good luck
 

WoodchipWilbur

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This may be a heresy - so others can comment on the wisdom/feasibilty - but given the dimensions would it be possible to use kitchen worktop connector bolts.

Done on the underside they would not show if left in place, allows the wood lengths to be accurately aligned, trial clamping before gluing, bolts tightened gradually before glue dries.
I've done a job somewhat like that, though not exactly as you describe. The brief was for a single "worktop" c. 800mm wide and about 6500mm long, to be fitted in a house on an island some 150 miles from my workshop. I made it from relatively narrow (150mm) elm boards with two random interleaved joints (as in sketch). Glued up in one piece - but with great care to avoid getting glue where it needed to be taken apart. Made a "pipe clamp" over 6 meters long to keep the end joints together!
20211123_082554[1].jpg
Transported in small trailer and small boat to the island - and re-assembled (glued up) on site (with difficulty: the room was only 6500mm long!), bolted together with worktop clamps where the boards butted and sash cramps across the width.
Installation of the top (and the cupboards above and below) took me and my daughter apprentice a week to complete - and we lived on the job. Sweep the shavings aside and set up camp beds! When finished, you couldn't see which were the "break" joins and which were in the original glue-up. When they came to move, the sale was dependent on me being prepared to take it all out and adapt it for their new house. (Met at a trade fair, we're still good friends.)
Sorry - none of that memory lane stuff helps your current project...
 

Doug71

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Also it’s important to "cup and bridge " ie alternate the boards, which I’m not sure you have in that photo. Ian

This is often said but I don't always follow this rule 🙃🙂🙃🙂🙃

I think how a piece of furniture looks is important, often the boards match better and the top looks better if you use the boards the same way up.

As long as the timber is acclimatised hopefully there should be minimal movement, obviously quarter sawn is best.

Also if the boards are the same way up you sometimes end up with a continuous curve which can be easier to deal with than the rippled effect you can get from alternating the grain.

I don't think there is a right way to do it, wood just does what it wants sometimes anyway.

I suspect someone who knows what they are talking about will be along shortly to shoot down my blasphemous opinions :dunno:
 

Jacob

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.....

I think how a piece of furniture looks is important, often the boards match better and the top looks better if you use the boards the same way up.

As long as the timber is acclimatised hopefully there should be minimal movement, obviously quarter sawn is best.

Also if the boards are the same way up you sometimes end up with a continuous curve which can be easier to deal with than the rippled effect you can get from alternating the grain.

I don't think there is a right way to do it, wood just does what it wants sometimes anyway.

...
yes the alternating board idea is a bit notional. Might help in some circumstances, in theory.
 

Sgian Dubh

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I don't think there is a right way to do it, wood just does what it wants sometimes anyway.
I suspect someone who knows what they are talking about will be along shortly to shoot down my blasphemous opinions.
It won't be me. The link I put up earlier discusses this very issue with similar suggestions or conclusions. Slainte.
 

Biblu

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I forgot to say thank you after I caught up with all the replies. I found it very interesting to see the differing views, I think I have a tendency to persecute myself for not 'doing it right' so it was a good insight to see the various views.

This nugget was particularly helpful, it was so much easier than taking the board out of the vice and lying it next to the other every time. Thank you @Jacob !
1st board edge up in vice, balance 2nd board in it, check that it sits square (with a short straight edge) and check that it sits tight.

I continued with a bit more edging, but quickly reached my limit and with a baby quickly on the way, I realised that I just needed to finish this project. So it's far from perfect, but currently functional. I guess I might have to come and edit that in a years time 🤦‍♂️

Being my first time edging and glueing a panel of boards, I'm relatively pleased, even if it falls apart in a few months/years it was a great learning process and hours of enjoyment in amongst the hours of frustration 😄

IMG_4603.jpg
 
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