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Nova Viking Drillpress - any experiences?

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Gordon Tarling

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The relatively new Nova Viking would appear to be the answer to my dreams of the perfect drill press. However, before I splash out over a grand on one, I'm wondering just how reliable they will be in service. There's one or two reviews I've seen which seem to imply that service from the manufacturer may be a little lacking. There's also the fact that the relatively new motor technology doesn't seem to be very widespread yet. I realise there may be patent issues involved here, but I'd have thought someone would have come out with something very similar by now - perhaps they have and I've missed it? Also, is it significant that the manufacturer guarantees the machine for 5 years, yet the motor and drive electronics are only guaranteed for two years? Any experiences of these machines, or other thoughts?

Gordon

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Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Gordon, I have the Nova Voyager. I went through a similar period of indecision as you seem to be experiencing. Will the technology last? Is it reliable? Should I just get a multiple speed, belted machine with a powerful 3/4” motor?

The Nova motors have been around for 20 years already. If I get 20 years out of mine I will say that it paid for itself. Plus I have a Nova Saturn lathe, and this has essentially the same motor and computer.

I have not bothered to download updates for either machine. They are what they are, and still more than I need. The Voyager is wonderful and gets used all the time. I am sure that the Viking is the same.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Gordon Tarling

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Derek - thanks for that, good to hear from someone with direct experience. I didn't realise that those motors had been around for so long - how come they just seem to be getting noticed now? I already have a 12 speed belt drive machine and certainly won't be buying another machine with the same disadvantages - I do change the speed on this machine, but not as often as I should, or like!

regards from Lincolnshire

Gordon
 

Cabinetman

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My instinct is that it will be fine while it all works, as soon as the electronics start going wrong it will be a nightmare, I hope I’m wrong and that it’s a wonderful machine – just seems to have a lot relying on electronics . Not sure I would like the depth stop which works by turning the motor off when it reaches the correct depth, but at least it comes with an old-fashioned manual one as well. Ian
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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The computer depth stop is amazing. No guess work. Precision is built in.

Electronics and computers were (I suppose will remain) a concern as I am one who prefers to keep machines simple, but I reassure myself that they have been used this way by Nova for a decade or more. Nova machines (especially lathes) have a solid reputation. They have sold to many from of New Zealand to the world. If there was a weakness, we would have heard about it by now.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Gordon Tarling

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Cabinetman - I have to agree that the electronics appears to be a potential weak spot, but Derek seems to think they have a solid and well founded reputation with no real complaints of weaknesses or failures. My one remaining concern is that of service or parts in the UK, which will require a little investigation before I finally commit.

Gordon
 

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The Saturn and the Voyager are on my "to really try to save up for , even if it means giving up bacon butties for a while, list" and are items 2 & 3. Item #1 is a DSG 13x42
 

Davey44

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The relatively new Nova Viking would appear to be the answer to my dreams of the perfect drill press. However, before I splash out over a grand on one, I'm wondering just how reliable they will be in service. There's one or two reviews I've seen which seem to imply that service from the manufacturer may be a little lacking. There's also the fact that the relatively new motor technology doesn't seem to be very widespread yet. I realise there may be patent issues involved here, but I'd have thought someone would have come out with something very similar by now - perhaps they have and I've missed it? Also, is it significant that the manufacturer guarantees the machine for 5 years, yet the motor and drive electronics are only guaranteed for two years? Any experiences of these machines, or other thoughts?

Gordon

Linky
My goodness, I'd have to have a really urgent and regular need for a drill press that cost £1k. I thought I'd spent a lot when I bought a second hand one for £90, still it's only a slight increase and a shift of a decimal point eh?
 

Fergie 307

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My instinct is that it will be fine while it all works, as soon as the electronics start going wrong it will be a nightmare, I hope I’m wrong and that it’s a wonderful machine – just seems to have a lot relying on electronics . Not sure I would like the depth stop which works by turning the motor off when it reaches the correct depth, but at least it comes with an old-fashioned manual one as well. Ian
electronics are not exactly new tech. I assume you don't still drive a car with points and a carburettor, or use a radio with valves, other than as collectables. CNC and other electronic/computer controls have been in use for decades in metalworking, even at the hobby level.
 

Cabinetman

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electronics are not exactly new tech. I assume you don't still drive a car with points and a carburettor, or use a radio with valves, other than as collectables. CNC and other electronic/computer controls have been in use for decades in metalworking, even at the hobby level.
Whilst not being a total dinosaur I have experienced a enough of life to believe my comments to be fair, take for example my big dust extractor press the button it starts, press the other one and it stops. My fine particle extractor has three speeds and you can set it to run for different length of time it’s been nothing but trouble.
 

Fergie 307

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Whilst not being a total dinosaur I have experienced a enough of life to believe my comments to be fair, take for example my big dust extractor press the button it starts, press the other one and it stops. My fine particle extractor has three speeds and you can set it to run for different length of time it’s been nothing but trouble.
wasn't having a go, just making the point that electronics are no reason to doubt the reliability of something per se. Like anything else it depends on the quality of the design, and how well it's made.
 
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