NOVA DVR XP

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Pen Davas

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I have a non working Nova DVR XP lathe and would like to put a 1624 - 44 headstock replacement on. Wanted to know if lathe beds are compatible, and XP tailstock will line up with a 1624 - 44 headstock OK. Any help appreciated.
 

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To the best of my knowledge the bed extensions are the same for those series of lathes which would imply the parts would be interchangeable. I have a 30 year old Nova 3000 with the square beds and the new extensions will fit to it. Go through the Teknatool site to see what part number the extension beds are for each modle they sell. Bet it is the same number for each. Should be the same for the tailstocks of the models you are looking at.

Any reason you aren't seeing if the DVR can be fixed?

Pete
 

Pen Davas

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To the best of my knowledge the bed extensions are the same for those series of lathes which would imply the parts would be interchangeable. I have a 30 year old Nova 3000 with the square beds and the new extensions will fit to it. Go through the Teknatool site to see what part number the extension beds are for each modle they sell. Bet it is the same number for each. Should be the same for the tailstocks of the models you are looking at.

Any reason you aren't seeing if the DVR can be fixed?

Pete
Many thanks Pete, good call.

Unfortunately our DVR was sited in a dampish workshop, and hence suffered the dreaded condensation, which in turn blew the sensor chips on numerous occasions. Which was working out expensive. Speaking with Record Power at the time they said this was a common problem.
 

Adam Pinson

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Many thanks Pete, good call.

Unfortunately our DVR was sited in a dampish workshop, and hence suffered the dreaded condensation, which in turn blew the sensor chips on numerous occasions. Which was working out expensive. Speaking with Record Power at the time they said this was a common problem.
Thanks for the heads up, my workshop isn't exactly dry !!!
 

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Unfortunately our DVR was sited in a dampish workshop, and hence suffered the dreaded condensation, which in turn blew the sensor chips on numerous occasions. Which was working out expensive. Speaking with Record Power at the time they said this was a common problem.
Fortunately I bought my DVR XP when Sorby were the UK distributors 16 years ago, this was all explained at the time & following their advice it‘s still performing admirable, shame Record didn’t do the same when they took over the distribution rights.
 

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My gut feeling (a little too big but I can still see my toes) is that getting a new headstock will be expensive so finding a used 1624-44 lathe might be the way to go. You would have extra beds, tool rests, etc as a bonus. One of the things I do like about the Nova line is that they built on a good platform that is backward compatible rather than making changes for the sake of change. My 3000 is a 1624 that came with a flange mount for the motor rather than a face mounted one like some that came later had. That gives me the option of taking the single phase motor off, replacing it with a 3 phase motor and VFD, allowing me the variable speed option should I ever want it. My shop is fully insulated and heated so I don't have the moisture problem you have, besides the winter is too long and cold to work without it. 😉 Now if only we had more trees here on the prairie. 🤔

Pete
 

Pen Davas

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My gut feeling (a little too big but I can still see my toes) is that getting a new headstock will be expensive so finding a used 1624-44 lathe might be the way to go. You would have extra beds, tool rests, etc as a bonus. One of the things I do like about the Nova line is that they built on a good platform that is backward compatible rather than making changes for the sake of change. My 3000 is a 1624 that came with a flange mount for the motor rather than a face mounted one like some that came later had. That gives me the option of taking the single phase motor off, replacing it with a 3 phase motor and VFD, allowing me the variable speed option should I ever want it. My shop is fully insulated and heated so I don't have the moisture problem you have, besides the winter is too long and cold to work without it. 😉 Now if only we had more trees here on the prairie. 🤔

Pete
Hi Pete,

We have sourced a brand new, old stock 1624-44 headstock and motor, from Record, who no longer are distributors. So, whilst a little pricey, it basically means a brand new lathe for half price! Now that's got to worth it.

John g
 

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Get some extra belts for it if you can. They are not always easy to find. I ordered some from eBay in the US that were presumably for the lathe and they were the proper length but had 4 ribs and my pulleys have 5 ribs. They wouldn't replace them until I sent the incorrect ones back at my expense. 🤬 Now I have a few spares so won't have to deal with them again. They don't break often but if you don't have a spare.....you know how it goes.

Pete
 

Pen Davas

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Get some extra belts for it if you can. They are not always easy to find. I ordered some from eBay in the US that were presumably for the lathe and they were the proper length but had 4 ribs and my pulleys have 5 ribs. They wouldn't replace them until I sent the incorrect ones back at my expense. 🤬 Now I have a few spares so won't have to deal with them again. They don't break often but if you don't have a spare.....you know how it goes.

Pete
👍 Good point, will speak to Record if they have any old stock.
 

Pen Davas

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👍 Good point, will speak to Record if they have any old stock.
Screenshot_20211123_171244_com.android.chrome.jpg
 

MorrisWoodman12

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Excuse my ignorance but what is the DVR? I get the impression it's a chunk of electronics that, in this case, is effected by damp and dust. In my electronic design days there were occasions when my design would be subjected to d&d so would be protected with a conformal coating. This is readily available from sources such as RS and Farnel as a spray can quite inexpensively. The conformal coating is easy to apply and dries quickly and depending upon the type easy enough to remove if major repair surgery is needed. i suggest the clear flexible type.(I've also found it good for resealing my leaking walking boots 😁)
Of course I may be barking mad/up wrong tree -- take your pick.
Martin
 

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The DVR is short for Digital Variable Reluctance. I have no idea what that actually means or how it works. Everything is in the swivelling headstock and there have been a number of models over the years. This link has a rudimentary cross section of the headstock. Problem Solving Products Issue 24 NOVA DVR XP Lathe I have no idea if the newer models have dealt with the moisture issues but then most of us don't keep them in draughty soggy shops either. 😉 I wouldn't be surprised to learn other more modern lathes are having the same issues but the DVRs have been around for decades so more likely have had more machines show up with the problem simply because they were among the first with electronics in them.

Pete
 

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Back in 2008 our woodturning Club bought a Nova DVR/XP and I dithered about buying one myself, because the convenience of having variable speed has some appeal over that of having to change the belt. However, in use, the head unit seemed to get quite warm and I was concerned about whether that might affect the electronics.

It struck me that once out of warranty, if the electronics failed, it could render the head unit - which of course includes the motor - beyond economic repair. Thus, all that I'd be left with would, in effect, be the bed and tailstock of a 1624/44, onto which I'd need to buy and fit a 1624/44 headstock and motor to restore the lathe to working order.

That is precisely what has come to pass with more than a few DVR/XP owners.

Therefore, instead, I decided to buy a 1624/44, which comes with a 1.5HP motor. My decision wasn't based on the initial purchase price, but on the long-term cost implications of a DVR/XP, and it's a decision I haven't regretted. (Thanks to Pen Davas for the 'heads up on' Yandles spare belts - I've ordered one, just in case!).

The 1624/44 (which refers to it's capacity: 16" swing over the bed, and either 24" or 44" between centres), has an eight step pulley, to cover the speed range from 178RPM - 3000RPM (in Europe, Oz, NZ & S.A), or from 215 - 3600 in USA & Canada. On the face of things, that might infer that in use, we'd be forever changing the belt speed, but in reality, that's not the case. Sure, If I'm going to turn a bowl from a blank that needs to be trued up before it can safely be turned, I might start off at a slower speed, then when it's running true, increase the turning speed to that suited to the bowl diameter, then finally, reduce the speed for sanding and finishing. If I'm turning pens, I might turn the blank at 2,000 RPM or so, then when sanding and finishing, drop the speed to around 200 RPM.

That might sound like a bit of a faff, but it's literally a two-minute job to change the belt. If I spend a couple of hours at the lathe, that's just a blink of the eye. (Another point on which to ponder, is 'how many professional woodturners use variable speed lathes, (or for that matter, fancy sharpening systems such as Tormek and Pro-Edge?). My guess would be 'not very many').

The woodturning club's DVRXP is still going strong, but then it only get used for one 3-hour meeting a month, so in the eleven years to lockdown, it's had less than 400 hours in total - far less than the average enthusiastic hobby woodturner.
 

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Interesting Richard. Mine has a 240J marked on it at the moment which also has 610mm on it and the 6th rib had to be cut off to fit the 5 rib pulleys. The replacement spares I have are 230J (no length) and are 5 rib. The 240J is in the middle range of the motor mount swing and the 230J is at the short end of the limit. The 584mm belt above might be too short, certainly minimum, for my lathe and a rib too many. I suggest those looking for the belts confirm the number of ribs and the length of the belt before ordering. Would you know if there is more than one spec or designation system?

Pete
 

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