• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Not what you want to see!

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

DIYDad

Member
Joined
8 May 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
2
Location
North Wales
Looking at the bark (only a thin strip so this is purely guesswork), I think:
Not Oak
Possibly wild cherry but cherry bark is often more orange or brighter
Maybe worth throwing Mountain Ash/Roman into the mix if it’s been growing in the UK
None of these thoughts are from woodworking experience and it is more years ago than I care to remember that I studied horticulture so not 100% reliable there either!!
4E1AD214-B839-41D5-A277-3981BC5754AC.jpeg
 

Yojevol

Clocking on
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
813
Reaction score
233
Location
Cheltenham
1634814843737.png

Having just searched thru my book 'Tree Bark, A Colour Guide" by Hugues Vaucher, I agree it's probably not cherry. The only one of 560 photos which was a possibility is sycamore which, in this circumstance, must be a possibility.
A search on the net came up with the above photo from paulkirtly.co.uk
Brian
 

DIYDad

Member
Joined
8 May 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
2
Location
North Wales
Yes I thought Sycamore might be a possibility too but got to the overthinking stage of older tree bark is more scale-y. As younger (relatively) trees have smoother bark Sycamore might be more likely?
 

Sean Hellman

Established Member
Joined
27 Dec 2009
Messages
137
Reaction score
14
Location
South Dartmoor, Devon
Looks more like beech to me and wood worm love it. You can get worm in oak heartwood occasionally especially some to the hybrids, but you will not see it totally eaten through like this.
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,504
Reaction score
332
Location
UK
You can get worm in oak heartwood occasionally especially some to the hybrids, but you will not see it totally eaten through like this.
That's not the case. As I said in my earlier post oak can be riddled with tunnels excavated by the grubs of common furniture beetle - it can take many decades and repeat infestations, but it does occur especially in unheated and relatively damp buildings. Oak is not the favourite food source of the common furniture beetle, but if that's what is available they'll munch on it. Slainte.
 

Essex Barn Workshop

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
11 Jul 2020
Messages
200
Reaction score
159
Location
Loughton, Essex
Beech would make sense, there were some smaller pieces of beech within the barn. No cherry was mentioned, and I don't think it's sycamore!
Whatever, it's firewood now!
Thank you all very much for the responses, and keep them coming.
 
Top