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JohnS

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Hey Folks!
New "joiner" and total newbie here.
I'm not in any relevant trade and have no knowledge or experience.
Got some random tools, mostly from boot sales and I've got tools for basic DIY for when that pops up.
I've recently started becoming interested in using my tools more and discovered the rabbit hole that is woodworking and power tools videos on YouTube.. :D
So, along with this page, what are other good places and references?
I would like to know what tools would be considered as essential for someone at my stage, maybe somewhere where the jargon is explained like names of tools, the different joints and how and what they are for and sorrento techniques etc etc.

Really like the idea of (locking myself away from the wife and kids) learning to make something and learning new and useful skills. Also from my recent tinkering in the shed, I've realised that this can help me to relax a little learn some patience as everything else in my life is a matter of multi tasking, trying to be efficient and everything is done at 100mph...
 

Geoff_S

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Hello John, what sort of stuff are you thinking of making?
 

MikeG.

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Morning John, and welcome.

The best way into a lifetime of woodworking is to start with a handful of simple tools, and master them, then when you run into the limits of what you can achieve with those tools add new (to you) ones slowly as necessary. I mean, you're not going to start by attempting a 10 seater dining suite with carving, so there is no need to set up as though you are. A tenon saw, a handsaw, a drill and some bits, a set of chisels, a mallet, a plane, a combination square, a knife ( a small vegetable knife from the kitchen will do nicely) and a tape measure .......that's all you need to make some reasonable little projects and begin developing your skills. Plus of course a way of sharpening your edge tools, be that an oilstone, some diamond plates, or a sheet of glass and some wet 'n dry.

Don't fall into the trap of surrounding yourself with all sorts of blingy gismos which you have no idea how to use. It's much better to be learning about wood rather than learning about tools, and that means getting on with some small projects with a limited range of kit.

Your number one most important tool, though, is your bench. Building one is possible with what I listed above, but you can pick up second hand ones on Ebay with a vice for only £30 to £50 if you keep your eyes open.
 

DBT85

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Welcome!

There are hundreds of interesting you tubers to have a watch of that cover many disciplines within woodworking. Paul Sellers is what really got me into it and gave me the confidence that I too could cut mortices and make a whole workbench. Others on more power tool sides could be people like Jay Bates, Fishers Shop (a personal favourite) etc.

There are lots of tools you need (you don't need) and lots of tools you'll want (also probably don't need).

I tend to find a project that could make use of a tool I don't have before I buy it.

In all honesty my workshop is usually just a space for me to fix things for around the home rather than work on creating. Something I'm desperate to change.

The most fun I've had in there really was cutting those mortices, tenons, etc on my workbench. I'd never done anything like that (despite being very handy) and it was great fun. I did mine entirely with hand tools but it's by no means a requirement.

Just get going, enjoy yourself, don't let anyone tell you you can't do anything, there are often many ways of doing the same thing depending on the tools you have available and most importantly of all, sharpening does not need to be complicated. Sandpaper will work just fine but it's not the most cost effective in the longer term.
 

worn thumbs

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Another addition to the numbers here is always welcome.The woodworking spectrum covers all sorts of things and most of us gravitate to a particular region as our interests crystallise.Try a range of things as and when they appeal and don't be tempted to buy too many flash gizmos until they are really likely to be useful.One of the basic requirements is a bench of some sort,but a workmate will get you going and a bench hook is a handy thing to have as well as a practice object.
 

Andy Kev.

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Have a look at the "Hand Tool Review Links" topic under "Hand Tools" on this site. There are a lot of reviews of tools which you may and may not need. You'll also see a few book reviews there. I'd recommend The Anarchist's Tool Chest (not all would - see the row the review of it generated) as it will tell you more or less everything you need to know about tools and The Essential Woodworker which will help you use them well.

There is a mass of material on Youtube. Maybe start with Paul Sellers and Richard Maguire (the latter also known as The English Woodworker). Good luck!
 

Blackswanwood

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Hello.

I would echo the points above particularly having bought some shiny gizmos that I quickly found I don’t need ... there is far more satisfaction to be gained in making something than having a super shiny saw.

There are a lot of guys on here with a lot of knowledge which they generously share. If I am starting something I haven’t done before I always search on here and have a quick read of what has gone before. Quite often there is more than one way to do something ... just ask a question about sharpening or the best way to cut dovetails and sit back ... but I think that part of the enjoyment is working out what works best for you.

Following other people’s projects is a good way to learn and get ideas ... but when you see other people’s great work it can also make you feel overawed. I simply try to make everything to the best standard that I can and hopefully a bit better than the last thing I made. That’s pretty much what everyone is doing ... others are just further along the woodworking journey!
 

JohnS

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Thanks for the welcome folks!
So my "workshop" is a shed that doubles up as normal home storage. The inner dimensions are a measly 7ft by 5ft.
Most of my tools are second hand from when I moved in here, they were already in here like a couple of rusty chisels that I've managed to clean and sand to kinda sharp and some second hand power tools etc. It does have a bench of sorts, it runs alone one length. I've attached a vice to it. Just gives me a little work surface.
Actual work wise, it's so far little tinkering things.
I recently picked up a few old pallets (for free) just so I've got access to some wood and I don't need to store it anywhere as it sits outside so I've made a phone/tablet holder based on the IKEA one and I'm currently making a rainbow which is now ready for my daughter to paint, hopefully today. It's not a curved rainbow, I wanted to do it as simply as possible so to lesson the chance of me ballsing it up! :D
If I figure out how to add photos to this, I'll stick a couple up... Real basic stuff, but I'm trying to get my kids involved so it has to be simple or they can't do it and it won't keep their attention.

Funnily enough my father (66 years old, been an engineer and an electrician his whole life) got in to woodworking a few years back.
He has a double garage converted to a workshop and a whole ago his brother (real wood flooring expert and carpenter) lost a close friend. The friend was a master carpenter and my dad ended up buying all his tools and equipment. The widow didn't want to take any money but he did pay her as he come away with tens of thousands of pounds worth of hand tools and machines! Table saws, mitres, pillar drill, full size lathe and a bunch of other stuff I don't know as well as hundreds and hundreds of hand tools off real high quality and some unique that the fella must've needed, didn't have and so made. It's really impressive and about 40 miles away from me under lockdown! :wink:
 

DBT85

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Sounds like you are already having fun John. Time to move into dad's garage haha.

Ive seen people make amazing stuff on their patio or in the garden because they only basically have a place to store tools but not work, so don't let it get to you too much. It can be frustrating though and it's why I finally cleared our junk room 3 years after moving in!

Your space won't easily tolerate one of the huge benches most would make but if you've at least got a vice in there it can make life sooo much easier than trying to do things without it.
 

woodhutt

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Welcome to the forum John! You've already had a wealth of good advice from other members so the only thing I'll add is that you should stay on the good side of your Dad.
Look forward to seeing some of your work.
Pete
 
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