Newbie say Hello, and looking for some advice

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Stormsinger

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Hello!

I just started learning to turn and was recommended to this site by Mark.

About me, well I'm female and in my, well, let's leave the age bit alone :), but I've left school well behind me :) I live in gloucestershire but have a worcestershire postcode (I live on a wiggly county border basically :)), and I work as a sales admin for a mushroom farm/packer (exciting work!) (I wasn't being entirely unsarcastic there :)). I've always made stuff, it used to be the classic girly stuff like sewing, knitting, cooking, etc, but over the recent years I've picked up things like building my pcs (with help from knowledgeable friends) and now, with the advent of my letting my hair get long and wanting to use sticks to hold it up in hairstyles, I've found it hard to find turned wooden hairsticks in the UK, and that was closely followed by the 'well it can't be impossible for me to learn how to do that' and a quick google to find an evening class :) I think it took me about the first lesson to realise that I was probably going to be enjoying the creation aspect. Oh dear, now comes the expensive part, so I'm starting off slow....

I've now got a mini lathe and a few tools, but what I really need now is the wherewithal to sharpen the few tools :). I've been looking for a bench grinder, and other than Mark telling me I need the white wheel for the HSS tools, I'm having trouble working out what is a reasonably priced good bench grinder.

I was thinking that a budget of around £25-£35 (not including delivery if bought online) should be able to get something, but like I say, I don't know what is a good make/bad make, good deal/bad deal. I would dearly appreciate any help/recommendations anyone could make.

I realise that as a bare newbie I only have this single post so far, but I nearly always lurk rather than post on the forums where I am a registered member, especially where I know a lot less than everyone else (I like to read and learn though :)), and I look forward to much more lurking and reading in the future :)
 

MikeG.

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Welcome Stormsinger,

we are a jolly little bunch, and have converted the odd lurker into a regular over the years. Somebody from the round world will be along soon to help you with your query, but if they don't, you could start a new thread in the Turning/ Lathes/ Hades section.

ATB

Mike
 

cornucopia

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hello and welcome :)

I presume the Mark your ref to is Mark hancock?

my grinder is a very cheap no name chinese one from one of those whole sale tool place's- its lasted me for the last 11 years no problems- it has 6" wheels and as you say white wheels for hss- when i replace the wheel there probably cost more than the machine!!

the wheels are the most important thing

axminister do a range of grinders but i think the cheapest they do is £40 ish
 

Stormsinger

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That would be the right Mark.

So essentially, any 'cheap' grinder will do, even if I have to get the white wheel seperately?
 

loz

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Hiya,

My grinder was cheap as chips from B&Q, but bought a jig ( costly ) ,

You might want to add a few pounds for parts to self build a jig, there are plenty of guides around, and a few experienced members on here that have built there own.

Regs

Loz

ps - i didnt bother replacing the wheel, just learnt to reduce pressure, but once you have your profile right, you can just use a diamond card etc to keep an edge, or a leatherhoning wheel with some compund applied - i make far fewer trips to the grinder now and mainly hone,


Grinder - 15 pound from B&Q

S7002065.jpg
 

Lightweeder

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Welcome Stormsinger. The more ladies 'of a certain age' the better. There are a couple of us on here, though I think the others are a bit younger than I am :cry: :cry:

I've just replaced my cheapo grinder, purely because mine was jumping all over the workshop. You can spend as much or as little as you like on this hobby but, like most things in life, you get what you pay for (sorry for that). I managed with badly sharpened tools for a long time, but if you spend a bit on your grinder and a bit on a jig to help you sharpen them, and you've laid out for your lathe and tools, etc etc - well, you have to decide for yourself I suppose.

The people on this forum are brilliant, kind and helpful. They know a lot and are happy to share it.

Very best of luck to you.

LW
 

hog&bodge

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Hi like you am new to turning and without doubt this is the best
place on the web to get help and advice..
Sharp tools are a must...when you get it right the results
are great.
Few other bits help keep you safe, dust-mask & face protector
or at least eye protection is a must.

Look forward to reading more posts on your progress
also Pics of your work help members let you know what
or where you are going wrong...
so don't be a lurker.. :D
 

CHJ

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I think a cheap and cheerful grinder is fine for your current needs Stormsinger, with a white oxide wheel, if possible a slightly wider one makes it a bit easier with gouges.

Main problem you are likely to have with a cheaper machine is a possibility of vibration from out of balance wheels, either get supplier to replace it or get someone with the ability to sort it for you.
A lot of the 'chinese' wheels have the central hole out of alignment with the molded recess in wider wheels.

I'm still using my Cheap and Cheerful Grinder bought in 2005.

If you are into having a go at making your own jigs then This link and the one above might help.
 

petercharlesfagg

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Welcome to the obsession and the forum!

16 years ago I bought a Draper 6 inch grinder for £16.00, replaced one wheel with a 100 grit and made my own jigs out of off-cuts. It worked, not well but it worked and taught me more than I could learn from an expert! I am still using the grinder but only for my Roughing Gouge.

IF (a big if), like the recommendation from another poster you can spend more money and invest in a "System" Wolverine or something similar, it will save you many frustrating hours trying to get the angles right in the first instance. Secondly the grind is easily repeatable without the frustrations of having multi-faceted grinding angles!

As a beginner it is by far safer for all concerned if the grinding bit is relatively easy! Flying tools, Blue clouds in the workshop and upset boyfriends/spouses all disappear!

Regards, Peter.
 

mrs. sliver

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Nice to have you on board! :D (we are catching you up lads!) :twisted:

You will find a LOT of help on here. It is a great site full of wise old spinny people, and can be a lot of fun at the same time.

Grinderwise. I am also a cheap as chips B&Q type.

Best advice I can offer? 1, Enjoy it 2, try not to go bankrupt!

The first is easy the second.... hhhmmm! :lol:
 

Stormsinger

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I really shouldn't lurk and type when i'm at work (though it does make the day more, I was going to say bearable but maybe that should be 'bare'-able? :lol:

Thanks for the welcome, and I'm trying to keep to a budget at the present, I know from previous crafts I've picked up, how easy it is to let things get away money wise (you should see how much yarn I have stockpiled to get through! and yet I still decided to learn how to use a drop spindle, just so I could, you know, know how to make my own yarn....).

I may be a touch obsessive in my crafting :) (and yet no one believes me when I say that if I won the lottery, I would not missing going to work at all, in fact I would probably be busier :))
 

DUNK_WALES

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Record does a nice 6" for around £40-50 or the 8" for about £50-£60 both free poastage in a lot of places like poolewood both come with a corse wheel and the fine white wheel :)
 

mrs. sliver

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It may save you money! you can make your own drop spindles now!
I made a few for a friend who spins, Then sell the wool to buy more stuff! :shock:
 

Stormsinger

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mrs. sliver":qg2jmxoj said:
It may save you money! you can make your own drop spindles now!
I made a few for a friend who spins, Then sell the wool to buy more stuff! :shock:

Now this would be a good idea apart from one fatal flaw, I like to knit as well :lol: I do like the idea of making at least one drop spindle for myself at some point :D

This is why winning the lottery doesn't mean I'd have nothing to do once I was able to give up work. Mostly because after the turning, the spinning wool, the knitting, then there's crochet, sewing, lacemaking, playing with the PCs, the travelling, making bead jewellry, and the painting that I would like to get back to doing if I had the space, along with the playing the guitar again.

Frankly, I think I need to make some of my hobbies start paying for themselves!
 

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