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Powerman

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Hello everyone my name is Wayne I am quite new to woodworking and have had some reasonable success so far.

I am currently building a 12ft x 12ft woodworking shed. I want to build a 7x5ft main centre table with built in table saw at one end and router at other end. I have planned on having a full T track set up. That’s firstly what I would like some advise on. Positioning how many rows etc.
I will also be putting on the legs the coasters that lift the table to move it and then drop it back down.
I was also thinking of a bench the full width of the back about 2ft-2.5ft wide. I would like to have a section that is modular, board that is put/slid in and out and each piece with a different tool. Bench grinder, fret saw, planer, drill press. Not sure how I am going to do It completely yet either!
I plan on having some sort of dust extraction unit with the cyclone bag set up in one of the rear corners either above or below the fixed bench. I want one 4in hose that will be directed to each tool I when needed by hooks on the roof joist above each tool. I am looking at something like theaxminster ac37e or ac82e. My question is has anyone used either, or what equivalents are out there? How does this setup sound and would anyone do it differently.
I will also have a french cleat wall on one side for most tool organisation.
i will have high level wood Long length storage on the other wall.
I have built 4ftx12ft area underneath the rear of shed as it’s built on a slope its 500mm deep. I lined it with thick dpm plastic sheet and ply wall sides and rear with three doors in between the posts that support the base.
I will also have storage that I pull down from between roof joists too.

Please give me you opinions on how this setup sounds. What you would change or add.
Oh yeah and if that ain’t enough. I am also going to attempt to build two stable style doors for the front t and g bottom door panels and windows in the top. Front opening is 6ft x 7ft.

Pictures are of the shed in build the rear underneath doors for wood storage. The others are a wardrobe for the Missus shoes and a crib I made for my daughter for her birthday made from reclaimed floor treads off a work project. I love to recycle materials. Rear doors off same job just modified and handles from a kitchen we ripped out last year!
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Orraloon

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You are not going to have much space left to work in with the workbench and a 7x5 work table. I have my router on the tablesaw wing and the whole footprint is about 5'x2.5'. Some people make the workbench the same height as the saw table so it can double as the outfeed table. A 12' workbench is also eating into the space. 6'x2' would be ample for most. Being able to access both ends of the bench is handy and if you want a tail vice then you have to access at least one end. Being able to get all round the bench is best so having it mobile is good. Best space saving is have everything able to be moved and set up as required for the job in hand. All those best shed layout articles you see are for those with the luxury of huge sheds. As to dust extraction I would advise at least a 2hp machine and if possible have it outside the shed in its own shelter as they all tend to leak fine dust. Overall and at the risk of repeating, best advice I can give is being able to move everything around.
Regards
John
 

MikeG.

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Welcome Wayne. You're going to enjoy your new workshop......

.........but you may have to have a little rethink of the sizes of the stuff you are planning for the inside of it. I did a little drawing:

Powerman's workshop.jpg

This doesn't leave enough room to walk, let alone work. And if you build anything of any size you haven't got room on the floor for it.

If you want the drawing with a scale so that you can play about with it yourself, drop me a PM and I can email it to you.
 

MikeG.

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..... A 12' workbench is also eating into the space. 6'x2' would be ample for most. Being able to access both ends of the bench is handy and if you want a tail vice then you have to access at least one end.
I suspect from the poster's title and from his description of his tools and methods of working, that he isn't a hand-tool woodworker, so I don't think he'll be wanting a tail vice.

Being able to get all round the bench is best so having it mobile is good.......
Hmmmm.....We'll never agree on that! :) Best in my view is a sturdy bench permanently located in the prime spot in the workshop, with no movement in it at all. You never get "rock solid" and "mobile" in the same bench.
 

Powerman

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Firstly I would like to say thank you for your input guys. I like the idea of a bigger bench so how would 5x3 work? I am new but like old school methods. Main reason for table saw was accuracy and repetitive cuts are more accurate too.
I have only brought the table saw and I have a handheld makita router drz50 I think.
I have a decent set of marples chisels.
I would like some advise on flat bits compared to auger style bits please.
 

Droogs

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An auger will in theory give you a more accurate hole in terms of diameter size and in trueness of shape than a flat blade bit (more vibration in use in a power drill). In a brace not as much a difference but the auger will usually give you a cleaner entry point and smoother walls in the hole. The one to use is really determined by the working method you choose to work to. Though when drilling angled holes an auger in conjunction with a guide block will give much better results
 

MikeG.

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I agree with Droogs, but would add that augers pull themselves into the wood, and so once you get started they can be a bit difficult to control. By that I mean they go quickly, and they stay in the direction you set them off at, so if you go wrong at the start you can't easily straighten things up. Spade bits (the flat ones you mention) are brilliant bits of kit. They are endlessly sharpenable with a file, and they can be filed down in width if you want a hole a specific size that doesn't match any bit you have. They can be accurately started (like an auger) because they have a point in the middle, and unlike an auger, you can adjust the direction once you're under way if you find you are going a bit wrong. Stop once the point reaches the back of the workpiece, flip it over and drill in from the other side to avoid a big break-out mess.
 

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