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New Yankee Mitre Bench & Storage

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Anonymous

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evening..

Has anyone built this monster of a bench themselves? I am half way through at the moment and have come to a slightly confusing piece of assembly.

I cant decide how Norm wants the dedicated mortiser to sit on the bench. He seems to be telling me to cut out a section of the bench top, and place a block underneath to support the machine. Not sure I am 100% following his thoughts.

Has anyone seen/recall the programme? Its been a while since I saw it (no pun intended). It might only be the hardboard he wants the space cut into, but it does state both hardboard and ply should be cut out. This would leave a huge great hole down into the drawer below.

Would be handy if anyone could remember how the bearded one finished this part of the bench off.

Also, it would be useful to know what size chop saw he intended to use, as the unit clearly fits back onto a wall, but you would lose a great deal of space behind the saw extension boxes if you were to use anything that was more than 5 inches from back of saw to the centre of the blade. You need the clearance behind the saw from the wall you see. Hmm I didnt make that very clear..

All help, suggestions greatfully received. I might have to cut a box section out of the workshop wall to allow the chop saw rails at this rate!!!

thanking you...
 

martyn2

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:D hi biglouie i might have the show on video i will see if i can find it and try to copy it to dvd if you want , but yes you cut a hole out the bench top as far as i can remember and use a blank when not in use . t was a good idea

Martyn
 

Midnight

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As with most of Norm's shop projects, religiously duplicating Norm's sizes will only work provided the tooling you're intending to fit to the bench is identical in all respects to Norm's... Somehow I doubt that's gonna be the case here....

The remedy is to back engineer the set-up.... adjust the cut-out / packing to suit your tooling so that the reference faces for each tool are in the same plane....
 

Freetochat

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From what I recall there was also a lip on the rear of the insert attached to the mortiser, so that when forward/downward pressure was applied the mortiser didn't lift.
 

Lord Nibbo

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biglouie":25wbejmu said:
evening..

Has anyone built this monster of a bench themselves? I am half way through at the moment and have come to a slightly confusing piece of assembly.

I cant decide how Norm wants the dedicated mortiser to sit on the bench. He seems to be telling me to cut out a section of the bench top, and place a block underneath to support the machine. Not sure I am 100% following his thoughts.

Has anyone seen/recall the programme? Its been a while since I saw it (no pun intended). It might only be the hardboard he wants the space cut into, but it does state both hardboard and ply should be cut out. This would leave a huge great hole down into the drawer below.

Would be handy if anyone could remember how the bearded one finished this part of the bench off.

Also, it would be useful to know what size chop saw he intended to use, as the unit clearly fits back onto a wall, but you would lose a great deal of space behind the saw extension boxes if you were to use anything that was more than 5 inches from back of saw to the centre of the blade. You need the clearance behind the saw from the wall you see. Hmm I didnt make that very clear..

All help, suggestions greatfully received. I might have to cut a box section out of the workshop wall to allow the chop saw rails at this rate!!!

thanking you...
Yes he did cut through the 18mm ply and hardboard, these bits are then bolted to the morticer to make it easier to plonk it on the bench top when needed. The frame to hold the top covering has 200mm over hang at the front so part of the support for the morticer is the carcase itself, a bit of 2x1 is screwed near the back of the opening from below the 18mm ply, a small piece of wood is screwed at the very rear bottom edge of the piece that is now bolted to the morticer to stop it falling forward when the handle is pulled down.
 
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Anonymous

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all seems to make sense then. Will go ahead and make that cut in the next few days..

thinking I might change it to include a router table on the left hand side of the table and may just have a sliding support for the really large pieces of wood. Its a great deal of space to simply give up to you chop saw.. Will see how we get on, but thanks for the response on mortiser cut out.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Biglouie

I've just made a small version of the bench, with just a few adjustments, and it is incredibly solid.

The cut for the morticer is made at, iirc, 45 degrees and as Lord Nibbo posts there is a block added to the underneath of the cutout at the back to stop it tipping forward in use. The cut goes through the ply and hardboard.

I don't have the plans, but I do have the video.

Pm me if you need anything.

Cheers
Neil
 

woodshavings

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I am mid updating my workshop. I have just about completed a "Norm Style" router table and are now planning the mitre bench. My plan is to use the recess to take either the mitre saw or the morticer, with the beds level with the bench.
John
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks for the response Neil. All help greatfully received although I'm still not 100% sure I understand the cut. 45 degree angle?

Well it is certainly a solid bench and large as well. I have reduced the sizes and tailored the plan to fit my requirements. I just worry that because the bench butts up to the wall, a sliding chop saw takes up too much room behind the saw, hence the mitre boxes need to be positioned down the middle of the counter top, leaving a gap behind. (about a foot of wasted space)

Now obviously, I can build some drawers and shelving into this gap, but I am now on the look out for a non sliding chop saw that takes up less room behind the blade so that it can sit much further back on the bench, wasting less bench top space. :)

Anyway, just wondered if anyone had run into the same thought processes. :)

I need a quality chop saw anyway. :) I'll stick a post on that in the Buying forum!
 

Argee

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As I remember, He fitted the morticer into the slot as shown below, with an extension piece at the back which slotted underneath the bench, as previously mentioned, to prevent the machine tipping forward when force was applied to the operating handle. The diagram below may assist. The top part is the machine base, the bottom shows the cutout details, with the lower shelving parts shown darker.

The "dummy" piece needn't have the extension piece. The machine is located in the socket by tipping it slightly backwards and inserting the tongue extension first. HTH



Ray.
 
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Anonymous

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ok, got it 100% now. Lip attaches to the blank, prevents it tipping up. Am with you now.

Thanks for the links and pics...
 

Adam

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Newbie_Neil":2258bclr said:
I've just made a small version of the bench, with just a few adjustments, and it is incredibly solid.
Thanks for the response Neil. All help greatfully received although I'm still not 100% sure I understand the cut. 45 degree angle?
Perhaps a photo would help Neil? :lol: :lol:

Adam
 
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