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Anonymous

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I've just picked up a Harrision jubilee wood turning lathe. It's old but very well built. Any body out there with and tips and tricks that could help me with this particular lathe, or tips in general. What would be the best start project as I would like to see my two young children grow up and if I ever wanted to play the piano in the years to come, keeping all my fingers would be an advantage...!

Is it best to have the lathe turning as fast as possible to get the best finish..? :wink:

I've also got a box of old tools, some of which are files that have been adapted, to take a cutting edge...?

What would be a good starting selection of turning chisels...?

Thanks in advance :lol:
 
G

Guest

Guest
The best way to start is to take some lessons. Ask tools run tuition classes in Birstall, not very far from you at £35 a day. They are on the internet (www.asktools.co.uk). I have read that files ground into chisels can be brittle and shatter, especially with beginners who will have "dig-ins"
I would start with the minimum number of chisels until you decide which are the ones you will use. Good luck and happy addiction.
 

Hans

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Jaymar is right, hands on tuition is best.

Reading a good intro to woodturning might help as well. Personally I thought Keith Rowley's "A Foundation Course" very good.

Happy turning.

Hans
 

Martin

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I very much second Hans' recommendation for Keith Rowley's book.

For turning tools, make sure you buy HSS rather than carbon steel (which whilst slightly cheaper, will blunt more quickly, and it's easier to "blue" cutting edges with carbon when you grind them).

I started out with a set from record - see http://www.recordpower.co.uk/index.pl?p=RPCHS6&a=i. Cheaper to buy in a set like this, and it will give you most of the chisels you need to start with. If you're interested in bowl turning, they also sell an expanded set that includes a bowl turning gouge and scraper.

You will also need a grinder - doesn't need to be anything fancy - a £40 job from axminster will do, provided you've got the right wheel on. But read Keith Rowley's book - it will tell you most of what you need to know about woodturning in general.

Martin
 
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Anonymous

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:idea:
I'd definitely endorse Keith Rowley's Foundation book (and the companion volume Projects... any book makes more senese when you've had some practical guidance.
Do check out the Register of Professional Turner's site at:
http://www.rpturners.co.uk/index.asp
it will give you a list of those offering tuition and perhaps most important, what to expect from any tutor.
 
A

Anonymous

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Thanks for the info, ladsand thanks for the link to "The Register of Professional Turners"

Thanks
Tim :p
 
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