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New to turning - advice please

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Togalosh

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Hello,

I have got access to a (good quality but not well equipped) lathe with the lend of some (not so good..ok poor) chisels & I'm really enjoying using it but I am not planning to get into turning to the same depths as you all are... I think...

I've read a few posts/threads on this topic & my main concern is that if I get a decent set of chisels (say Sorby) for £100 which is more than I can really afford & more expensive than the 2 sets of HSS ones from Axminster (but I'd hate to waste £80 on rubbish) how much more can I expect to pay for tools to keep them sharp? Can you point me in the right direction of what I'll need?

Also is there a good text book on the subject you can recommend please? I have Mike Darlow's Fundamentals of Wood Turning in my basket at Axminsters but I've bought some woeful books in the past & need to avoid doing the same again.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Togalosh
 

Togalosh

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Thanks Mick - it gets great reviews too..1 less item in my Axminster basket.

Maybe I will wait until I've read it before purchasing tools.
 

Phil Pascoe

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If you can borrow some tools, find out what you use most , and buy good ones one at a time: if you buy a set, you'll nearly always buy at least one tool that you very rarely (or never) use, which negates any saving.
 

nev

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+1 for keith rowleys book. it also contains a section on sharpening - whats required, why and how.
Its a question that gets asked a lot and if you use the search feature up in the top right of the page and search the turning forum for sharpening or grinders you'll have plenty reading :) (in short a 6 or 8 inch bench grinder with the correct type of wheel and a jig of some sort to rest the tool on)
I agree with phil.p buy your gouges one at a time. I find myself using either the skew or the bowl gouge 80% of the time, so the lesser used gouges can wait for the lotto win before theyre replaced :)
 

Togalosh

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Thanks Nev & Phil,

..1 x Keith Rowley book on it's way & I'll be using the search option more in future (& resisting doing 5 things at once when online) .. I have modified a basic grinding wheel so buying another wheel shouldn't break the bank nor should 2 or 3 good chisels.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Another downside of buying sets-- a row of identical handles won't do you any favours.
If you buy one at a time you can get different handles, or better get them unhandled and turn your own.
 

Silverbirch

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Another vote for Phil Irons book. I t would provide a more modern and attractive counterpoint to Rowley's book. I'm no doubt in a minority of one, but I find the latter a bit dated and dull. I don't much like his "laws of woodturning" approach, though I'm not disputing the solidity of the information it contains.

Ian
 

nev

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Silverbirch":2shapkum said:
Another vote for Phil Irons book. I t would provide a more modern and attractive counterpoint to Rowley's book. I'm no doubt in a minority of one, but I find the latter a bit dated and dull. I don't much like his "laws of woodturning" approach, though I'm not disputing the solidity of the information it contains.

Ian
:)

I have both books and they both have their merits but for the complete beginner its Rowleys for me.
 

Silverbirch

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I have both books and they both have their merits but for the complete beginner its Rowleys for me.
I have both books and they both have their merits but for the complete beginner its Irons for me. :p

Ian
 

Pipster

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I have actyally made a vey good semi circular cross section scew chisel my grinding down a half round file and making a handle in the lathe using a piece of copper pipe as a ferrel.. I also made a bowl scraper for getting under the rim by making a similar handle and griding down a large allen key to make a right angled scraper... old files are great for making scrapers with... I inherited a lot of good Sorby tools along with my lathe but my home made ones are the ones I use most !
 

Jonzjob

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The idea of making turning tools from files has been talked before and the answer to it has always been NO. Files are brittle and will break and possibly cause you damage!

I have tried to find a thread discussing this? I am sure others will tell you the same.
 
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