Need some guidance with my wood floor

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monster

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As others have suggested - that looks like paint rather than filler. If you keep sanding with an aggressive sander, such as a floor sander from hire shop, there is a good chance you will remove the remaining white marks.
 

Ozi

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Silly question - what does the landlord have to say about it? Did you ask before removing the carpet? I'm assuming this is all by agreement but if not, was the carpet more than five years old if so it had no legal value and if in a poor state you could have had them replace it. If less you may owe them a prorata proportion of it's purchase and installation cost - not replacement. Second thing is there a flat below? Wood floors can look lovely but you loose the sound insulation of underlay and carpet.
 

robgul

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Silly question - what does the landlord have to say about it? Did you ask before removing the carpet? I'm assuming this is all by agreement but if not, was the carpet more than five years old if so it had no legal value and if in a poor state you could have had them replace it. If less you may owe them a prorata proportion of it's purchase and installation cost - not replacement. Second thing is there a flat below? Wood floors can look lovely but you loose the sound insulation of underlay and carpet.

Have to say that was my first thought as a landlord of a couple of flats - if our tenants took up the carpet (or made any other material changes) we'd be displeased to put it mildly.
 

andy48

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1. Many flats have a covenant in the lease stating the floors MUST be carpeted. If you remove the carpet you may involve your landlord in a dispute with the freeholder, and he / she may seek to recover any associated costs from you.
2. Most rental agreements state that you may not alter what is already there without prior written permission from the landlord(s).
 

Dave Moore

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Hi,
A tough one. What may work but you would have to do a sample area is a rotary brass wire brush with the rotation along the grain. If it’s a big floor you might need to devise some type of roller to do this. It might be worth doing a bit of experimentation.
Regards,
Dave
 

TheTiddles

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Let’s presume they’ve read their tenancy agreement

We once had one that said we had to return it in the same condition we rented it in, said we can’t as we’ve already started cleaning.
 

Ozi

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Have to say that was my first thought as a landlord of a couple of flats - if our tenants took up the carpet (or made any other material changes) we'd be displeased to put it mildly.
I'm also a landlord (don't you hate the term) and have been on the receiving end of this and also as a tenant, one of the reasons I try to get on first name terms with tenants asap and make sure they have a phone number to contact me, though not my land line for obvious reasions. It can be even more of an issue in places like Holland. A friends brother in law rented a very nice flat only to have the previous tenant turn up a few days after he moved in to collect his wooden floor - I kid you not. It was all legal they really did own not just the flooring but the acoustic layer underneath, apparently this is not unusual in Holland (although it's the only time I have heard of it) as they expect rental contracts to last many years. Nick was then in the position where he had to replace the floor or at least the acoustic part which amounts to the same thing or be evicted with loss of deposit, fortunately he is a very wealthy bloke but it pays to know your legal position.
 

Ozi

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Let’s presume they’ve read their tenancy agreement

We once had one that said we had to return it in the same condition we rented it in, said we can’t as we’ve already started cleaning.
And that's why I'd like to see landlord licensing, not as our government would do it to rip us off but with a nominal fee say £50 and a reasonable theory test on laws and obligations, registered landlords would have access to an online site informing us of changes to the law. Then any tenant with a complaint that would hold up in court could get points put on your license, points that could only be removed by doing the necessary maintenance. That would allow tenants to vet landlords in the same way as we vet tenants. The whole could be paid for via fees to remove points, and the points on a license expressed as points per unit. Exceed a threshold and loose the right to rent the property. Get rid of the scumbags.

Sorry I will get of this soap box
 

TheTiddles

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I think we hold them in similar regard!

To be fair in a different place the oven stoped working one morning and that afternoon they were replacing it with a decent new one, saying they’d not put anything in they wouldn’t be happy to use themselves.
 

Phil Pascoe

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And that's why I'd like to see landlord licensing, not as our government would do it to rip us off but with a nominal fee say £50 and a reasonable theory test on laws and obligations, registered landlords would have access to an online site informing us of changes to the law. Then any tenant with a complaint that would hold up in court could get points put on your license, points that could only be removed by doing the necessary maintenance. That would allow tenants to vet landlords in the same way as we vet tenants. The whole could be paid for via fees to remove points, and the points on a license expressed as points per unit. Exceed a threshold and loose the right to rent the property. Get rid of the scumbags.

Sorry I will get of this soap box
My friend is a landlord. he would say the same should apply to tenants.
 

Ozi

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My friend is a landlord. he would say the same should apply to tenants.
As a landlord I agree but we can at least get credit checks and references, whatever laws we need we need good laws. My definition of which is that good law protects decent people from scumbags whichever side of any contract there are on.
 
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