Need Help on Bevel Cuts for Wardrobe Carcass....

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WelshGuy

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Hello, most of today I have been knocking my head against the wall on this one so I'm looking for some sage advice.

I'm building a fitted wardrobe (first large scale project) into my daughters bedroom using 18mm MDF, the square cabinets all fine... no problem there, however this is a fitted wardrobe in a dorma bungalow with angled roof in the bedroom. I have a design but for the life of me I can work out how to get the bevel cuts done on the blue part. I have a Makita Plunge Saw and my Table saw, but the size of the units make the table saw use not really viable. With the Makita Plunge saw i can do the one bevel but not the other as it only goes to 48 Degrees and I need 50 :(

Any ideas on how I can get the bevels cut on the Blue Part of this diagram, the diagram does not show it but the units is 580mm deep.

Bevel Problem.jpg


For info the wardrobe in made up of three carcasses, Carcass 1 and 2 are basically boxes which are good, but this is carcass 3, the triangle part to fit in the angled section of the bedroom ceiling, so the angles cant really be changed.

Any suggestions?
 

Darrenp

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Hello, most of today I have been knocking my head against the wall on this one so I'm looking for some sage advice.

I'm building a fitted wardrobe (first large scale project) into my daughters bedroom using 18mm MDF, the square cabinets all fine... no problem there, however this is a fitted wardrobe in a dorma bungalow with angled roof in the bedroom. I have a design but for the life of me I can work out how to get the bevel cuts done on the blue part. I have a Makita Plunge Saw and my Table saw, but the size of the units make the table saw use not really viable. With the Makita Plunge saw i can do the one bevel but not the other as it only goes to 48 Degrees and I need 50 :(

Any ideas on how I can get the bevels cut on the Blue Part of this diagram, the diagram does not show it but the units is 580mm deep.

View attachment 106963

For info the wardrobe in made up of three carcasses, Carcass 1 and 2 are basically boxes which are good, but this is carcass 3, the triangle part to fit in the angled section of the bedroom ceiling, so the angles cant really be changed.

Any suggestions?
Could you not put a packing piece under the saw to get the correct angle ?
 

Jacob

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Not clear quite what you are doing, but I'd most likely cut them both at about 45º a bit over size, and then ease them with a plane, to fit. Might be easier to bevel an end on each of the shorter bits, rather than two bevels on the longer bit.
The green bit looks as though you are lining the ceiling with MDF. Do you need to do that? Couldn't you just replace it with a lath at the front edge?
 

GerryT

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You can get the 40 but not the 50 with your plunge saw.
Maybe use a test piece at the max plunge saw range (48) and see how that fits.
You may be surprised to find that it‘s nearer the 50 degrees than you think.
Or as suggested by Darren you could find some way of packing up the saw or maybe the piece itself to get the 50 degree.
I wouldn’t be overly fussy if it was 2 degrees out if it was in my own home .
 

Inspector

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I would make both cuts with the table saw.
One cut with the wood flat on the table.
Second cut vertical against the fence. Make a taller fence to hold it against. If you think it might go into the blade slot, clamp a board across it to sit on top of the fence. NOTE: The blade guard may have to come off so either exercise extreme caution or make a tunnel (3 sided box) to clamp on the table, over the blade, from the left, leaving just enough for the piece you are cutting to pass.
Make the vertical cut first and then the horizontal second. Easier to get the length on the flat.
Pete
 

johnnyb

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having done a few understairs jobbies I'd not rely on measuring the angles to much I'd build a few degrees flexibility in the design to allow you to alter to the correct angle ie allow some up or down on the upright. also I would remove as much waste as possible using the saw then skim 2 degrees off using a jigged router or easier a hand plane.
 

mr edd

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+1for cutting the angle at the maximum your saw will cut and hand plane to the angle required. I have just made 6 triangular wardrobe carcase's and did exactly that.

Ours were stepped in size to to fit under a 38 degree pitch roof the fun part was making a jig so I could get domino's to work at the acute corner.

Cheers
Edd
 

WelshGuy

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Thanks lots of great ideas here think i will cut at maximum angle then try with a plane to fine tune it.

Will try with a few scraps first :)
 

manglitter

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There is a method of cutting this angle with the tracksaw. Difficult to explain without photos, but basically you clamp the board vertically to the side of your bench and use the saw to cut the opposing angle on the end of the board (rather than the required angle on the face).
In your case you would cut 40⁰ on the end, which would leave an angle of 50⁰ on the board.

I did say it was difficult to explain 😆
 

Doug71

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There is a method of cutting this angle with the tracksaw. Difficult to explain without photos, but basically you clamp the board vertically to the side of your bench and use the saw to cut the opposing angle on the end of the board (rather than the required angle on the face).
In your case you would cut 40⁰ on the end, which would leave an angle of 50⁰ on the board.

I did say it was difficult to explain 😆

I was going to suggest this method as I thought I had used it in the past but when I started trying to explain it I realised that because the saw cuts bevels under the rail you would be cutting into the side of your bench so got a bit confused :unsure:, guess you could pack it away from the side of the bench with a sacrificial piece? Anyway WelshGuy would need a bench over 1.5m high to perform the cut :)
 

manglitter

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I was going to suggest this method as I thought I had used it in the past but when I started trying to explain it I realised that because the saw cuts bevels under the rail you would be cutting into the side of your bench so got a bit confused :unsure:, guess you could pack it away from the side of the bench with a sacrificial piece? Anyway WelshGuy would need a bench over 1.5m high to perform the cut :)

Yes you need to pack out from the bench with some scrap.
If a panel length is slightly longer than the bench is high, I have packed up the bench surface to suit, however at 1.5 meters I would be asking the boss to do a redesign for practical purposes...
 

TheTiddles

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I had this same quandary, so just moved the surface away a bit and set it at 45, then I could use a router bit or saw to set a 45 degree angle easy enough. Doing it by hand is the other option
 

TheUnicorn

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I would set to your maximum bevel then sand or plane as needed. That said, I did find this jig on youtube, it was the first I came to so I'm sure there are plenty more, all complicated by size of your board. The jist is that jig holds the circular saw at 45 degrees to the board and then you offset the additional angle (5 degrees) with the saw. I think the idea works, but I'd make the jig shallower, say 15 degrees, and then do the rest of the bevel with the saw (35 degrees)

 

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