Need a new block plane

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segovia

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The Veritas is not heavy enough for me, my LN gets used most I also have a Clifton Low Angle Block which was a bit disappointing on first use, it's wide and does not sit in the hand as good as the LN. I'll find a use for it one day
 

Inspector

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How much does the LN weigh? My Marples/Record is 660g the Veritas I just picked up for Kittyhawk is 850g and my NX60 is 800g which I sometimes wish was lighter.

Pete
 

segovia

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How much does the LN weigh? My Marples/Record is 660g the Veritas I just picked up for Kittyhawk is 850g and my NX60 is 800g which I sometimes wish was lighter.

Pete
The Veritas is 245g, the LN is heavier but nor sure by how much, if feels a lot more than 245g
 

Inspector

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The Veritas is 245g, the LN is heavier but nor sure by how much, if feels a lot more than 245g

That must be the Apron plane which according to their website is 14oz/396G, still higher than your number.

The Standard Block Plane is as I said in post 22 twice as heavy at 850g but they don't mention it in the description. I did check it on two different electronic scales though.

Two different classes of planes. Next time I'm in the LV store I'm going to take a close look at the Apron Plane and consider getting one.

Pete
 

Kittyhawk

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Well I don't know what my $5 cheapie block plane weighs and I don't think the weight issue will bother me - all I know is that I am looking forward to the Veritas Standard with great anticipation. It'll be nice to be able to adjust a block plane blade without resorting to whacking it with a hammer.
However that issue is in the background a little bit now because I have to go back to the lathe and redo both engine cowlings on the FW190s due to not reading the vernier properly. I hate it when that happens.:mad:
 

Kittyhawk

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Since I have a beautiful new Veritas block plane on its way to me courtesy of Inspector Pete, this question is purely academic.
My present el cheapo block plane has no adjustment other than the blade, the sole is flat and true, the cutting edge of the blade is to the correct angle and is razor sharp. So why does it always chatter when planing with the grain?
 

Jacob

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Since I have a beautiful new Veritas block plane on its way to me courtesy of Inspector Pete, this question is purely academic.
My present el cheapo block plane has no adjustment other than the blade, the sole is flat and true, the cutting edge of the blade is to the correct angle and is razor sharp. So why does it always chatter when planing with the grain?
Usually means the blade is not firmly bedded behind the mouth. One quick but rough solution is to bend the blade a touch in the middle so that it's a tight fit at top and bottom ends.
 

paulrbarnard

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Since I have a beautiful new Veritas block plane on its way to me courtesy of Inspector Pete, this question is purely academic.
My present el cheapo block plane has no adjustment other than the blade, the sole is flat and true, the cutting edge of the blade is to the correct angle and is razor sharp. So why does it always chatter when planing with the grain?
I upgraded one by wrapping the blade in cling film/ceran wrap and then putting a good dollop of epoxy in the bed. Fit the blade while it is still flowing and it will set to make a larger bed that is perfectly matched to the blade. I have a cheap Stanley low angle that now performs as well as my LN low angle.
 

shed9

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I upgraded one by wrapping the blade in cling film/ceran wrap and then putting a good dollop of epoxy in the bed. Fit the blade while it is still flowing and it will set to make a larger bed that is perfectly matched to the blade. I have a cheap Stanley low angle that now performs as well as my LN low angle.
Can you expand on this, not sure what you mean but intrigued by it.
 

Kittyhawk

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I upgraded one by wrapping the blade in cling film/ceran wrap and then putting a good dollop of epoxy in the bed. Fit the blade while it is still flowing and it will set to make a larger bed that is perfectly matched to the blade. I have a cheap Stanley low angle that now performs as well as my LN low angle.
Darned good idea. I'm going to do that.
Can you expand on this, not sure what you mean but intrigued by it.
What paulrbarnard advises is that the blade should be firmly mated to the body where it exits through the throat. To do this, spread a dollop of epoxy onto the lip of the body where the underside of the blade protrudes through the body and refit the blade with a layer of cling film between the blade and the epoxy. The blade will level the epoxy and the film will prevent the epoxy from sticking to it. I imagine there will be a wee bit of clean up when the epoxy cures.
At least I hope that's what he means and I'm not putting you crook.
 

Jacob

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Darned good idea. I'm going to do that.

What paulrbarnard advises is that the blade should be firmly mated to the body where it exits through the throat. To do this, spread a dollop of epoxy onto the lip of the body where the underside of the blade protrudes through the body and refit the blade with a layer of cling film between the blade and the epoxy. The blade will level the epoxy and the film will prevent the epoxy from sticking to it. I imagine there will be a wee bit of clean up when the epoxy cures.
At least I hope that's what he means and I'm not putting you crook.
Good idea!
I'm a bit lazy so I'd just bang it with a hammer. Flat side down over two nails or something then whack the bevel side in the middle
 

D_W

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Since I have a beautiful new Veritas block plane on its way to me courtesy of Inspector Pete, this question is purely academic.
My present el cheapo block plane has no adjustment other than the blade, the sole is flat and true, the cutting edge of the blade is to the correct angle and is razor sharp. So why does it always chatter when planing with the grain?

put thin psa abrasive on the blade, lay it in place, affix the lever cap on and work the adjuster and see where it marks.

The only block plane that I have is a stanley 18. It will plane bubinga like nothing as long as the iron is set up with geometry that doesn't fold (actually, I"ll go one further - it will plane cocobolo with silica and 1.1SG density bone stock other than flattening the sole - which i did need for that kind of work.

But it's a little older and reasonably well made, and I"m sure the lever cap can flex the iron a little to bed it.

I'm going to assume that just as is the case with bench planes, most of the work done on block planes is solving a problem other than what's there.
 

paulrbarnard

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Darned good idea. I'm going to do that.

What paulrbarnard advises is that the blade should be firmly mated to the body where it exits through the throat. To do this, spread a dollop of epoxy onto the lip of the body where the underside of the blade protrudes through the body and refit the blade with a layer of cling film between the blade and the epoxy. The blade will level the epoxy and the film will prevent the epoxy from sticking to it. I imagine there will be a wee bit of clean up when the epoxy cures.
At least I hope that's what he means and I'm not putting you crook.
That it.
 

Jameshow

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put thin psa abrasive on the blade, lay it in place, affix the lever cap on and work the adjuster and see where it marks.

The only block plane that I have is a stanley 18. It will plane bubinga like nothing as long as the iron is set up with geometry that doesn't fold (actually, I"ll go one further - it will plane cocobolo with silica and 1.1SG density bone stock other than flattening the sole - which i did need for that kind of work.

But it's a little older and reasonably well made, and I"m sure the lever cap can flex the iron a little to bed it.

I'm going to assume that just as is the case with bench planes, most of the work done on block planes is solving a problem other than what's there.

Only one block plane?!🤔🤔🤔
 

D_W

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Yes sir. I have trouble finding a place where it's beneficial to put down a smoother and use a block plane.
 

D_W

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Forgot, I did get my son a steel Stanley block plane, but it would be difficult to use on polite work due to a monstrously large mouth.
 

Inspector

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Chris you could use a little plasticine rather than epoxy just to see if any is needed or if you just have a high spot or two that needs taken down. That way you don't have a bunch of epoxy to dig out if it isn't needed.

Pete
 

Kittyhawk

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Chris you could use a little plasticine rather than epoxy just to see if any is needed or if you just have a high spot or two that needs taken down. That way you don't have a bunch of epoxy to dig out if it isn't needed.

Pete
I did dress up the throat a bit but that was before I was made aware of the importance of the proper grounding of the blade in the throat so it probably a bit of a rumpty job - will check tomorrow. Don't have plasticine but have a few lumps of smurf poo which is the same consistency so will try that as well.
 

clogs

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this is getting all very interesting...
smurf poo.....mmmm bit like hens teeth here.....lol.....

cant wait to get my toys outta storage......!!!!!!!! I hope I live long enough to enjoy them at this rate.....
 
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