• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

NE bowl in yew

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Tazmaniandevil

Established Member
Joined
19 Apr 2011
Messages
796
Reaction score
0
Location
Stirling, Scotland
It happened again. I have been rough turning some bits and decided upon a natural edge bowl from some of the yew I picked up at work. I took it as thin as I dared, to allow for true-ing it up later. About 15 mins after it came off the lathe, the bark started to peel. I broke out the superglue and stuck the loose bits back down, then ran the glue round the edges of the bark.
Ruddy stuff still peeled off. This all happened in the shed incidentally. I only brought it indoors to take a photo.
Any suggestions on what I'm doing wrong here? It is clearly me, rather than the wood after all.
 

Paul.J

Established Member
Joined
27 Sep 2006
Messages
5,740
Reaction score
0
Location
Birmingham/England.
Bark is always difficult to keep on the edge Taz,especially Yew as it comes off in thin layers/flakes.
The ones i did manage to keep on in the past came off after time anyway so i don't bother any more.
What does look nice on lighter coloured woods is to pyro the edge,this gives a similar sort of effect but more permanant.
Nice bowl by the way :)
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
74
Location
Cotswolds UK
Wood harvested in the main growing season is most likely to shed the bark.
Winter harvested wood has a better chance of retaining its bark.
 

Paul.J

Established Member
Joined
27 Sep 2006
Messages
5,740
Reaction score
0
Location
Birmingham/England.
Any particular timbers that are better Chas??
I have had Yew,Cherry,Laburnum,Sycamore,Oak,Beech,Apple,Pear,Plumb,Ash,that i can think all shed their bark,and as far as i was aware were all felled in the winter months,which as i say i gave up trying to keep it on.
 

jurriaan

Established Member
Joined
3 Jul 2007
Messages
128
Reaction score
0
Location
Netherlands
I have had good luck with fresh ash, oak, cherry, beech and walnut.

Then again, once the sap is on the move in the thin layer between bark and wood, nothing I've tried will keep the bark on.

Unfortunately, you just have to deal with the wood you have, if you want a uniform medium to work with, I'd suggest making pottery from clay :)
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
74
Location
Cotswolds UK
Paul.J":6kcxdm3w said:
Any particular timbers that are better Chas??
Not that I can put my finger on Paul, a lot depends upon drying conditions as well, I've had Oak, Beech and Walnut turn out well,
but it is some considerable time since I've put a piece on the lathe with the aim of saving the bark so who knows what luck I will have next time.
 

woodyturner

Established Member
Joined
22 Feb 2011
Messages
860
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottinghamshire
That is one very nice natural edge bowl I to use a pyro iron sometimes on the edge if the bark comes of especially on Yew it just lifts the bowl to another level
 

Tazmaniandevil

Established Member
Joined
19 Apr 2011
Messages
796
Reaction score
0
Location
Stirling, Scotland
thank'ee kindly for the comments folks. I'm waiting to see what time does to the bowl before I take any more off'f it.

The limbs were cut while the sap was rising. The grounds superintendent prefers pruning to be done before the first frost. These particular limbs were overhanging a road, so had to go to prevent damage to a mature tree.
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
74
Location
Cotswolds UK
Tazmaniandevil":1wv51msy said:
.. I'm waiting to see what time does to the bowl before I take any more off'f it.
..
I would be reluctant to try and remount that piece, very unlikely it will run true enough to enable a tool to be used on it safely after it has dried out.

As an example of the perverse nature of bark retention see HERE
 
Top