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Mystery Tool

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AdrianUK

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Another strange item, although sure it won’t be to some on the forum.
Turning the threaded end turns the ball joint In the middle and so the hooked end.
The threaded end can be unscrewed, revealing a hollow section. There is also a strange opening o the threaded end.

6B77891C-8A24-4360-90D7-32EF1B090D91.jpeg
9C55E12A-6269-4D46-8F31-A65C76ED2ED7.jpeg
 

Argus

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It's a universal, angled drive to enable a brace and bit to reach inaccessible, angled places where a complete swing of the brace is not possible....... allegedly.

The bit goes in the chuck and the square tapered drive end is inserted into a conventional brace. The angle of attack is locked by the wing-nut.
It looks a fiddle to use.
 

Jacob

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I guess: it is (obviously?) a universal joint for a brace and bit, for drilling around corners?
Cable/pipe runs through joists spring to mind
 

Argus

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Thanks for that Geoff..........

Can't help thinking that the resonance of 'Quimby S.Backus' sounds like a character from a Groucho Marx film...... ;););)
 

AdrianUK

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Argus, Jacob, Geoff, thank you, always amazed at the knowledge members have for obscure items :)
It does indeed appear look a fiddle to use, will get it cleaned up, it’s all a bit stiff, but will see what it’s like to use.
Hopefully will find some markings underneath the rust.
 

Boringgeoff

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Backus' branding is frequently quite faint, usually found on the chuck shell, including his address as Winchendon or Holyoke, Mass, or Chambers St. NY.
I like the style of his chuck where the two lugs grip the shaft of the auger bit and hold the tang firmly in the square socket in the base of the chuck.
One of my favourite US manufacturers.
Cheers,
Geoff.
 

AdrianUK

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Hi Geoff,
Just found the mark, yes, your correct it is faint, just make out Q S B.... and Winchendon.
I was playing around with it earlier, not to difficult, however would take a little getting used to in practice. It becomes harder to put any pressure on the brace bit, as one hand needs to be on the universal joint and the other on the brace sweep
17A34E8E-DAC1-4AE9-82C5-8195C07D913F.jpeg
cylinder, so no pressure can be applied to the pad.
I wonder if these were common in use.
 

TRITON

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Certainly this chap had some strange ideas. Im not sure this was meant as either one or the other. I cant think of a use where you wouldnt have access to turn a brace handle, or need to buy or own both drills.
bracedrill.jpg
 

dannyr

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Certainly this chap had some strange ideas. Im not sure this was meant as either one or the other. I cant think of a use where you wouldnt have access to turn a brace handle, or need to buy or own both drills.
View attachment 112149
Did any other egg-beaters take taper square bits? -- surely our Quimby must have patented one

I can picture the scraped wrist when using the combo brace.
 

Boringgeoff

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Adrian, I don't think the angle device was very convenient to use, maybe it needed two operators? There were quite a few manufacturers made them, Millers Falls, Stanley (via John Fray) Goodell -Pratt are ones I know of. Backus also made a non-adjustable version of the angle borer.

Triton, what you have shown us, a drill-brace, the side wheel is removeable when you want to use it as a brace. The most frequently found were made by Millers Falls their model No182 seen in this link: Millers Falls Bit Braces 140 through 423
Looking at catalogues from the 1890's you could buy one of these for about $3, a breast drill and similar sweep brace were also $3 each, so by buying the drill-brace you could save yourself $3.
Quite frequently at a flea market you'll find a brace with the small bevel gear but the side crank missing, due to a previous owner taking it off to use the tool in brace mode and not replacing it.
I believe that James A. Chapman of Sheffield also made a version of this tool although I have never seen one.
Cheers,
Geoff.
 

Morty

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Can anyone identify an engineering hand tool I have with no markings at all. It's 8.5" long has a ratchet mechanism and obviously only turns in one direction depending which way up it is held. The conical end with 4 holes unscrews and the other end has a 3/8" square drive
 

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jcassidy

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It becomes harder to put any pressure on the brace bit, as one hand needs to be on the universal joint and the other on the brace sweep cylinder, so no pressure can be applied to the pad.
I wonder if these were common in use.
I was taught to push the pad with my hip bone to provide pressure - at least when drilling horizontally. But I only ever used one on a bench, not on a site. These were antiques even back in the '80s!
 

Boringgeoff

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Morty, what you have there is an Engineers Ratchet drill, which held a Morse Square Taper bit in the square socket, they were reliant on having something to back them to force the bit into the workpiece. I've posted a photo of one of mine mounted in a pedestal, to show what I mean. As you pull the handle the threaded shaft extends and forces the bit into the work. They came in a huge range of sizes and makers. The other photo is a small one, similar to yours, which has a 5/8" socket for the bit.

Cheers,
Geoff.
 

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Morty

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Morty, what you have there is an Engineers Ratchet drill, which held a Morse Square Taper bit in the square socket, they were reliant on having something to back them to force the bit into the workpiece. I've posted a photo of one of mine mounted in a pedestal, to show what I mean. As you pull the handle the threaded shaft extends and forces the bit into the work. They came in a huge range of sizes and makers. The other photo is a small one, similar to yours, which has a 5/8" socket for the bit.

Cheers,
Geoff.
Thanks Geoff, it had all my engineering friends stumped, I shall enlighten them
 
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