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My new toy - a Primus plane.

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MixedHerbs

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I have just taken delivery of a Primus Reform smooth plane. Does this count as a gloat?

http://www.fine-tools.com/G301047.htm

I think this is going to be a fabulous plane once I get to know it properly. I tried it "out of the box" on my beech workbench-top and the wood shines! The 50 degree blade angle suppresses tear-out and there is zero backlash when adjusting the blade.

After taking it apart, I have only just realised how it works. The instructions tell you how to adjust the plane, but not why it works. The diagram is clear, but again, there is no explanation as to why it works. I think that E.C.E. have assumed that "Well, there is a clear diagram, it's obvious how it works. It's a brilliant plane, we will just wait for the orders to come in".

The give-away that there is some shortfall in customer knowledge is an extra piece of paper included in the package headed "Additional instructions to adjust the plane iron parallel to the sole.". But, again, they do not tell you why you should need to do this except that you need to do this after turning the tensioning screw nut.

If you'd like to be bored, please read on. I shall attempt to explain how this plane works - if only to get it clear in my mind:

Look at the diagram on the above web page headed "Operation Instructions for the E.C.E. Primus plane".

At the back of the planebody, there is a knob. The knob is attached to a piece of steel that is in turn attached to the plane blade via the chipbreaker. The piece of steel is always in tension - through the use of a large spring just behind the knob - and is trying to pull the plane blade back against the blade-bed. However, since the blade-bed is at 50 degrees, the effect of this tension to to force the plane blade upwards away from the plane-base. This is where the chromed adjusting knob comes into play. This is attached to a threaded rod whose far end presses down onto the piece of steel under tension.

There is enough vertical give in the assembly to allow the chromed adjusting knob to raise and lower the blade. The clever trick is that this assembly is always in tension and so there can never be any backlash ie. slack. After a number of turns of the chromed adjusting knob, the tension in the piece of steel attached to the blade needs to be adjusted so as to keep the system in equilibrium.

Anyway, for now, the plane is in a thick polystyrene box in my workshop awaiting some serious use over the weekend. My first task is to dull the toffee-apple finish with some 0000 wire wool and wax. And then to introduce the blade to my 6000 grit waterstone.

Regards, Peter.
 

Philly

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Nice plane, Peter! I love woodies, they move over the surface so smoothly. The ECE sounds like a useful tool-let us know how you get on with it.
Cheers
Philly :D
 

MixedHerbs

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I have spent this morning smoothing a large section of my workbench. Observations so far:

The edge on the chrome-vanadium blade lasts well.

The blade height adjuster is fabulous. Even the slightest turn of the adjuster wheel has an effect on the shaving thickness - and the shavings can be extremely thin.

The lateral adjuster seems to be a complete waste of space. So much so that I removed it. There is very little sensitivity to it. I now use the little hammer used to adjust my Japanese plane - to great effect. As long as the tension knob at the back of the plane is reasonably tight, the blade stays where it is put.

I am very pleased and have had a very therapeutic morning.

Regards, Peter.[/quote]
 

Scrit

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Nice plane, Peter!

I've had one for yonks and they are the next best thing to an infill, really.

Scrit
 

Javier

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Nice plane. I bought one of ebay 2 years ago. Just the right weight for extended use. The horned front knob design is my favorite, it just feels
right. :D
 
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