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JakeS

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mtr1":3bqaqxbd said:
What do you want them for?
I'm also curious - what can they cope with?


Are they OK for holding a piece while routing a slot through the middle (housing joint or whatever)?

Are they OK for holding a piece while routing a profile into the edge?

Are they OK for holding a piece while running a belt sander over it?

Are they OK for holding a piece while hand-planing?

Are they OK for holding a piece while belting it from one end with a mallet extreme-croquet style?

(OK, maybe that last one is a bit silly. ;-)
 

mtr1

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My advise would be to only buy something when you need it, not because it looks good and then find a use for it.
 

Lons

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MrA":tppy9uua said:
Lons":tppy9uua said:
Wearing trousers and being an in charge kinda guy sorts that out, she knows what side her breads buttered....... She's not likely to read this forum either..... Hopefully.
Yeah right :roll: The last few words say it all. - you're the boss when she's out then :wink: :lol: :lol:

I'm the boss ALL the time, :D .*cough*
Ha :lol:

tell ya what - you give me her email address and I'll send her a link to this post :lol: :lol: :lol:

I'm an expert at being sent to the doghouse :wink:

Bob
 

Jacob

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JakeS":p5g3fa6g said:
mtr1":p5g3fa6g said:
What do you want them for?
I'm also curious - what can they cope with?


Are they OK for holding a piece while routing a slot through the middle (housing joint or whatever)?

Are they OK for holding a piece while routing a profile into the edge?

Are they OK for holding a piece while running a belt sander over it?

Are they OK for holding a piece while hand-planing?

Are they OK for holding a piece while belting it from one end with a mallet extreme-croquet style?

(OK, maybe that last one is a bit silly. ;-)
Just more daft gadgets. 90% of the comics and catalogue is about stuff which nobody needs.
 

bugbear

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MrA":v69ptg2m said:
Anybody use bench cookies? I saw them on youtube and thought they looked great, before I buy them and then suffers buyers remorse I'd appreciate any feedback.
Router mat AKA shelf liner is more versatile and cheaper

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Non-Slip-Grippe ... rid_pt_0_0

I use it in the back of my (carpeted...) car boot to stop luggage sliding around.

BugBear
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi,

You can get it from the pound shop as well, didn't look at the price, sorry.

:wink:

Pete
 

MrA

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mtr1":b59pum91 said:
What do you want them for?
I built my own work bench and was weighing up whether to use T track or bench dogs, it was when I goggled bench dogs that these cookie thingys showed up. What I particularly liked about them was the ability to continuously rout around a board without having to keep stopping and starting which can't be done with a rubber mat. That seems to be the only advantage I can see at the moment unless a forum member has used them and can feedback their experiences.
 

MrA

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Lons":222bibu8 said:
Ha :lol:

tell ya what - you give me her email address and I'll send her a link to this post :lol: :lol: :lol:

I'm an expert at being sent to the doghouse :wink:

Bob
I would rather you just took my word for it 8) . Wouldn't want put her off her cleaning duties.

My doghouse is called the garage and I actually like it in there, I want to put a TV in there but I have to sneak one in when she's away in September.
 

mtr1

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If you do a lot of routing like I do, a couple of quick release clamps would be better or wooden dogs and a tail vice, and you will use both options for more tasks too. both of these options are more money, but at least you will use them time and time again, and not have them sit on a shelf gathering dust, which is where the Bench cookies will end up IMHO.
 

Lons

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MrA":1yuhkke1 said:
I would rather you just took my word for it 8) . Wouldn't want put her off her cleaning duties.

My doghouse is called the garage and I actually like it in there, I want to put a TV in there but I have to sneak one in when she's away in September.
:lol: :lol: :lol: Word taken :wink:

Don't put a telly in the workshop btw. watching a bit of footy (or beach volleyball) whilst operating a tablesaw isn't the safest thing to do :roll:

cheers

Bob
 

Jacob

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Doug B":2n69r6m8 said:
Jacob":2n69r6m8 said:
Mind you the doughnuts aren't good for you either.

Neither are large egg custards =P~
I did offer to share it Doug! It was a good'n too. :D
Emma in the shop sets them out like bait - look away from the egg-custard and you are staring into the face of a steak and kidney pie. :shock:
 

MrA

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More musings...


I've installed ducting, a cyclone and an air filter yet dust is still present although not as much as before. I kept on wearing my double filter dust mask just be sure until I gained confidence in the duct extraction set up and the filters are still picking up dust.
I've concluded that there isn't an ideal solution for complete dust control, all that can be achieved is a little less hoovering up, fewer extractor bag changes and reducing the workspace "blow out" to once a month.

Unless someone has cracked it and wants to share.
 

Cheshirechappie

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The ONLY way to avoid dust in the workshop is to avoid the use of power tools and machines (and sanding!).

Many years ago, before I had a workshop, I did my wood butchery in the kitchen. A job involving the planing of some beech took so long (I now know because the planes were not very well set up) that on the next job, in mahogany, I vowed to do the roughing out with a power planer. One was duly aquired, and set up. The roughing out took about five minutes. The subsequent clean-up took four hours. For a couple of years afterwards, I found a red film of dust on every surface not regularly used. I would have handplaned the timber in about an hour and a half - that made me think a bit.

I now work with handtools only, and cleanup involves a bench brush, a floor brush, a dustpan and a bag for the bits. Unless I've had a very long planing session, it takes about two minutes. I sometimes wonder whether for an amateur, it might actually be quicker doing some projects by hand - no dust extract system installation and maintenance time, for one thing, and the money saved would buy some very fine handtools. That route, however, is not everybody's choice.
 

Jacob

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MrA":11pxql96 said:
More musings...


I've installed ducting, a cyclone and an air filter yet dust is still present although not as much as before. I kept on wearing my double filter dust mask just be sure until I gained confidence in the duct extraction set up and the filters are still picking up dust.
I've concluded that there isn't an ideal solution for complete dust control, all that can be achieved is a little less hoovering up, fewer extractor bag changes and reducing the workspace "blow out" to once a month.

Unless someone has cracked it and wants to share.
You are 3/4 the way there if you don't use MDF.
 

MrA

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Jacob":ci8hnz50 said:
You are 3/4 the way there if you don't use MDF.

I actually had that thought today, most of the dust appears to be MDF. I may stick to ply and conti as much as possible see, I'll still wear the respirator though.
 

MrA

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Cheshirechappie":1ma5ucet said:
The ONLY way to avoid dust in the workshop is to avoid the use of power tools and machines (and sanding!).
It only takes me 30 minutes to clean up and once a month I get the garden blower and have a great time blasting dust through the door for a few minutes. I dont have the skill nor the patience for hand held tools yet.

Having said that I've been practising hand sawing recently and I find it very satisfying, something manly about it......
 

kirkpoore1

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Probably the best way to learn power tool safety is to take a class on how to use the tool. On line videos don't show everything, and if you have a question they won't answer it. Some tools beg for classes: Table saws, radial arm saws, routers, router tables (yes, as a separate topic), even planers. Some tools demand a week long course to be used safely, like shapers. A few tools are hard to hurt yourself with, like bandsaws, but it certainly can be done.

Kirk
 

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