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Morticing by Paul Sellers

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bugbear

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Argus":1l4jionh said:
.

Worth a watch.

On this occasion what he demonstrates makes sense.

.
Interesting - he's using the Maynard/Gorman technique (flat face towards middle) as opposed to the more "obvious" way (flat face towards ends).

BugBear
 

dunbarhamlin

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That comparison stunk. Like pitting a pekinese against a comatose rottweiler and feigning amazement that the peke won.
 

dunbarhamlin

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Effectivey not, BB, since he's using the bezel as the face (and wasting some of the "power" from his silly little toffee hammer into the bargain)
 

Jacob

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bugbear":3njg134z said:
Argus":3njg134z said:
.

Worth a watch.

On this occasion what he demonstrates makes sense.

.
Interesting - he's using the Maynard/Gorman technique (flat face towards middle) as opposed to the more "obvious" way (flat face towards ends).

BugBear
The "obvious" way with an OBM is flat face towards direction of movement (i.e. next cut) but it seems to be vice versa with a bevel edge.
 

Corneel

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Well, he did indeed look a bit akward with the big chisel. His bench looked too high for such a big thing, The hammer looked very small. And hard to see, but it looked like the chisel had a single bevel all the way of 35 degrees, instead of something like 20 degrees with a 35 degree secondairy bevel.

But like I wrote, I have no experience in this field, so I''ll gladly accept any other opinion.
 

bugbear

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Jacob":1fnka5km said:
bugbear":1fnka5km said:
Argus":1fnka5km said:
.

Worth a watch.

On this occasion what he demonstrates makes sense.

.
Interesting - he's using the Maynard/Gorman technique (flat face towards middle) as opposed to the more "obvious" way (flat face towards ends).

BugBear
The "obvious" way with an OBM is flat face towards direction of movement (i.e. next cut) ...
Assuming you start in the middle (which, to be explicit, he does) that's what I said!

BugBear
 

DTR

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Corneel":3c3os8hu said:
Well, he did indeed look a bit akward with the big chisel. His bench looked too high for such a big thin.
I think I read on his blog recently that his bench is 40" (?)* high. That certainly sounds higher than the average

*edit: I stand corrected, it's 38"
 

marcros

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DTR":z62gwi39 said:
Corneel":z62gwi39 said:
Well, he did indeed look a bit akward with the big chisel. His bench looked too high for such a big thin.
I think I read on his blog recently that his bench is 40" (?) high. That certainly sounds higher than the average
IIRC David Charlsworth also advocates a similar height for workbenches?
 

DTR

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marcros":3km7igqk said:
DTR":3km7igqk said:
Corneel":3km7igqk said:
Well, he did indeed look a bit akward with the big chisel. His bench looked too high for such a big thin.
I think I read on his blog recently that his bench is 40" (?) high. That certainly sounds higher than the average
IIRC David Charlsworth also advocates a similar height for workbenches?
Fair enough. A higher bench has to be much kinder on the back when dovetailling. For general work I think I'd find 40" far too high (I'm 6'2"), but whatever works for the individual.
 

Jacob

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Corneel":2i66iyc9 said:
....... it looked like the chisel had a single bevel all the way of 35 degrees, instead of something like 20 degrees with a 35 degree secondairy bevel.......
He does single rounded bevel sharpening. Very sensible! Not many people realise that the obsession with two bevels, "micro" bevels etc, is a relatively recent fashion.
He certainly looks effective with his bevel edge chisel.
But I'm a bit doubtful about his OBM technique.
I was taught to do it quite differently:
1 First and most obvious is to use a big mallet - the biggest you can handle.
2 Hold the chisel vertically with every single cut - no levering at all except when it comes to cleaning out the bottom of a blind mortice. Waste is levered out as a final operation, with a smaller chisel same as Sellers demo. - Through mortices don't need this, the waste just gets pushed through.
3 Work it in the direction of the flat face - opposite to Sellers.
I'm sure it is faster (helped by the big mallet) but it also has another big advantage - you can do your mortice flat on a bench top (if it's low enough) or on a mortice stool (cf Ellis) without the need of holding devices or a vice. This is because the cut is always vertically downwards, no tendency to push the workpiece in any other direction.
In fact you couldn't exert maximum bash with big mallet on something being held as the holding device would leave marks.
I'll stick with this as far as OBMs are concerned but 'll certainly have a go with a bevel edge next time I'm at it.

PS bench height - a normal bench is a bit high for morticing. Mine is adjustable - I just insert/remove blocks under the legs as necessary. An alternative is a little step up - just a piece of ply on blocks.
Matthew's worry about warranty - you wouldn't want to bash one of those pricey fashion-statement chisels with a big mallet, which is another good reason for not buying them!
 

GazPal

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Paul simply shows a variation on one of several ways to chop mortise and whilst not everyone will find this technique to their taste, it's well worth trying. Thor hammers work very well for chisel work and have surprisingly good heft for their size, which tends to remove the stress from wrist and elbow as you allow the weight of the head to power each hammer strike, rather than trying to drive - what often tend to be - larger mallets using more force.

Standing 6'2", I like a taller bench, preferring 38" to the often raved about 34", etc., which seem to be in vogue at present. I find I suffer from far less back fatigue with a taller bench than if using one made to suit one of Snow White's dwarves. :lol:
 

DTR

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GazPal":397nvrk4 said:
Standing 6'2", I like a taller bench, preferring 38" to the often raved about 34", etc., which seem to be in vogue at present. I find I suffer from far less back fatigue with a taller bench than if using one made to suit one of Snow White's dwarves. :lol:
I lowered my bench from 36" to 34" on the recommendation of Schwarz but I don't think it's for me. The next bench will be higher again. How do you find 38" for hand planing?
 

David C

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Dave,

I like a 40" high bench, used to be six foot one inch tall.

Don't understand the American love of low benches at all.

David Charlesworth
 

GazPal

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DTR":1pxhj2zs said:
GazPal":1pxhj2zs said:
Standing 6'2", I like a taller bench, preferring 38" to the often raved about 34", etc., which seem to be in vogue at present. I find I suffer from far less back fatigue with a taller bench than if using one made to suit one of Snow White's dwarves. :lol:
I lowered my bench from 36" to 34" on the recommendation of Schwarz but I don't think it's for me. The next bench will be higher again. How do you find 38" for hand planing?
I've no problem using 38"-40" high benches and prefer them, but sincerely think the Schwarz could do with re-assessing his bench height recommendations.
 

bugbear

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Jacob":2qhimhks said:
In fact you couldn't exert maximum bash with big mallet on something being held as the holding device would leave marks.
Surely not if the workpiece is (also) flat on the bench, and there are various ways to achieve this.

I prefer the workpiece to be clamped, so that the pulling the chisel out of the cut has no chance of lifting the workpiece. Clearly, this is NOT needed for large workpieces were weight and mass are most helpful - timber framers don't clamp their work!

BugBear
 

Richard T

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When I was setting up the forge I read that the ideal anvil height would be the distance from the second joint in my index finger to the ground when standing with my arm straight down by my side.
I read it of other work benches too and when John (of John's Junk at the market) was trying to sell me an old BD Workmate, he enthused about being able to get it to the "right" height - I said "what, up to the second joint on my index finger when it's straight down by my side?" "Yeh, " he said, "[email protected] Ho%e high."

I don't know if this works out right for every bench on which you intend to bash, but it is a good height for the anvil. And I think Mr. Schwartz may do well to include some personal details in his instruction.
 
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