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Mortaring, but upside down?!

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okeydokey

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Google for a brick mortar gun - Screwfix sell them as well - a mix of mortar not to thick and not too runny then you can squeeze mortar out at any angle and it should stick into the crack (as its not a heavy mass) then 30 mins later perhaps run a spoon handle or something smooth and gentle along the mortar to tidy it up - if you need to as its not going to be seen
 

Cozzer

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Google for a brick mortar gun - Screwfix sell them as well - a mix of mortar not to thick and not too runny then you can squeeze mortar out at any angle and it should stick into the crack (as its not a heavy mass) then 30 mins later perhaps run a spoon handle or something smooth and gentle along the mortar to tidy it up - if you need to as its not going to be seen
At the worst end, it's got to be 3" away from the wall. The facia board - see? Getting into the correct lingo now! - is maybe 6" top to bottom. With you saying it's not a heavy mass, do I assume that I don't need to literally fill the void, but (somehow) just fill/seal it along the bottom edge?

EDIT : just a thought, but could I shove some "chicken wire"/similar into the gap before applying cement/mortar/God know what else? Would the wire assist it keying?
 

Adam W.

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Make a timber fillet to fit, fix it in the gap and paint it black.

Then have a beer.

Edit:
Your mortar will end up on the floor, as it's no good in that position
 

okeydokey

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I missed it going from 1/2" to 3" - mortar gun will do 1/2" as will external acrylic sealant (paintable) or silicone sealant (not paintable) but not 3" - so as Adam W suggests timber fillet. Perhaps a fillet cut from Celotex insulation board would be a lightweight filler/fillet and maybe easier as its lightweight to install.
 

Cozzer

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What a forum this is!
Thanks, chaps, for all the suggestions/ideas, and at the end of the day, based on your experiences and skills.
Fantastic stuff!
 

bluenose

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The first part of Ollie78's suggestion at #5 is your best best without a doubt. It's pretty much the way I would do it.
 

MARK.B.

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Was going to suggest stuffing the gap with wire mesh but was beaten to it, have used that method a few times and it has worked every time (y). get yourself a point master or similar pointing gun, you may need to experiment a bit getting the mix just right but one you do they are a joy to use- far quicker and easier than filling by hand.
 

MikeJhn

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Take all the wires off and fix in the gap, then put on a soffit board, easy enough job to scribe it to the outside line of the horizontal board, I have not read for the beginning of the thread, so may have missed something.
 

Jonm

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A lot of roofs have eaves ventilation. My new build has it continuously between every rafter. Clearly in your case it is not where the mortar has fallen out but may be above the “facia” board. I have mentioned this just in case you decide to box it all in.

The other point to check is that this fascia is bone dry and no signs of rot. I would check particularly where the downspout from the main roof goes in the gutter. As this has probably been removed and replaced, does all the water from the main roof go into the gutter and go to the outfall without splashing over. It should have a shoe to direct it. It would be worth checking when we next have a downpour. Personally I would put a strip of lead here, going from under the tiles to inside the gutter, just to make sure that any water splashes out rather than in.

The downpipe on gutter3.jpg looks odd, it seems to go to the back/behind the gutter. Unless it is a duct for the cables.

As for filling the gap, lots of suggestions on here, personally I would go for galvanised wire mesh, fixed somehow to wall or fascia with stainless steel screws and washers (probably plugs angled up in to wall. Or s/s screws through fascia to in amongst the mesh) then some mortar. No doubt it will crack but mesh will hold it together and screws stop it falling out.
 

Cozzer

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A lot of roofs have eaves ventilation. My new build has it continuously between every rafter. Clearly in your case it is not where the mortar has fallen out but may be above the “facia” board. I have mentioned this just in case you decide to box it all in.

The other point to check is that this fascia is bone dry and no signs of rot. I would check particularly where the downspout from the main roof goes in the gutter. As this has probably been removed and replaced, does all the water from the main roof go into the gutter and go to the outfall without splashing over. It should have a shoe to direct it. It would be worth checking when we next have a downpour. Personally I would put a strip of lead here, going from under the tiles to inside the gutter, just to make sure that any water splashes out rather than in.

The downpipe on gutter3.jpg looks odd, it seems to go to the back/behind the gutter. Unless it is a duct for the cables.
I was wondering when someone would spot gutter3!
(Oh God...another story coming up....)
Prior to the extension roof being re-tiled, it was a simple down pipe that finished with an angled shoe - about a foot above the slates - allowing the rain to 'fan out' over the roof and thence into the gutter. The original roof was Welsh slate (we were told, but completely shot) considerably thicker than the new man-made tiles. I suspect the difference in thickness has led to the roof pitch being slightly different...
The new tiles on, the old plastic guttering was replaced by the ally. (Not the downpipe, just the gutter below)
Come the first rain a few days after, the water came down the downpipe at such a rate, it fanned out over the new side roof.....and completely overshot the new guttering!
No matter how I altered the shoe, the result was the same....hence the Heath Robinson affair, with some 60 degree shoe turns and a final 90 to try and guide the water directly into the gutter. Not pretty, but it has worked.

Edit - forgot to mention...I don't think the facia is actually wood. Could be wrong, but might it be 'plastic' with a wood appearance?
 

Jonm

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Thinking again about how to fill the gap, I think I woild cut some ply, say 12mm thick, and cut it in strips say 100mm by 500mm. Get some galvanised wire mesh and roll it so it fits in the gap. Remove the mesh, fill the gap with stiffish mortar, push in the mesh, stainless steel screws through the fascia and in to the mortar/mesh mix. Then fill flush with mortar and put strip of ply horizontally between wall and underside of fascia, Fix ply to underside of fascia with screws So it acts as shuttering. Leave overnight then remove ply and fill any blemishes with fresh mortar, could use a piece of cloth to rub the surface to give it a “bagged“ finish.
 

Cozzer

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Thinking again about how to fill the gap, I think I woild cut some ply, say 12mm thick, and cut it in strips say 100mm by 500mm. Get some galvanised wire mesh and roll it so it fits in the gap. Remove the mesh, fill the gap with stiffish mortar, push in the mesh, stainless steel screws through the fascia and in to the mortar/mesh mix. Then fill flush with mortar and put strip of ply horizontally between wall and underside of fascia, Fix ply to underside of fascia with screws So it acts as shuttering. Leave overnight then remove ply and fill any blemishes with fresh mortar, could use a piece of cloth to rub the surface to give it a “bagged“ finish.
I think I'll certainly achieve a 'bagged' finish, no matter what I do!
Yes, yours is certainly an idea to consider, so thanks for that.
(It's certainly a lot more constructive an idea than my wife's, which was "Can't we just move?"!)
 

Spectric

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Most of the suggestions are coverups, rather than get to the bottom of the problems lets just fill the gap and all will be ok, what is actually not yet been revealed?
 

Jonm

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I think I'll certainly achieve a 'bagged' finish, no matter what I do!
Yes, yours is certainly an idea to consider, so thanks for that.
(It's certainly a lot more constructive an idea than my wife's, which was "Can't we just move?"!)
Sound like your wife is fed up with building work. Moving house can be extremely stressful and most things are outside your control.
 

Cozzer

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Most of the suggestions are coverups, rather than get to the bottom of the problems lets just fill the gap and all will be ok, what is actually not yet been revealed?
That's very true, Spectric. A good point.
Perhaps the corner in question isn't exactly 90 degrees?
Perhaps the uneven surface of the stone 'forced' the builder to fill behind the facia board?
I don't know. Have lived here for almost 20 years and never noticed it being 'out' (before most of it landed on the floor, anyway!)
I've a feeling it was built by the residents prior to the ones we bought the house from, so whatever the cause, it's not caused any problems for maybe circa 30 years....
 
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