Modifying woodies

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bugbear

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condeesteso":3gwv80nz said:
Got it fitting well with patience and very fine cuts (block plane for final adjustment). It's clamped up now.
The blade has been an issue - a very solid old Ward with an equally solid cap iron. As is very typical, there is some pitting on the back of blade just where the cap contacted. I am slowly working on that but it is tedious and I won't resort to a back bevel:

I see 3 alternatives

* use a back bevel until you've worked past the line of pitting; upside: low labour; downside: you have to maintain a back bevel, and the EP is altered.

* fully flatten the face; downside labour; upside; "perfect" blade

* grind blade past the pitting; downside: reduced life of blade; upside "perfect" blade.

They're all solutions - the choice is down to YOUR priorities.

BugBear
 

Corneel

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I would leave the sole as it is. A shellack finish will quickly rub off and you don't really need to wax it, because wood on wood glides wonderfully nice all by itself. A bit of wax won't hurt though.
 

condeesteso

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Sorry slow back. BB summarised - I'd gone back a little on the primary to remove much of the pitting, but ran out of patience for now. The narrow back bevel is no more than I would need to remove anyway to get a really clean back so in time I will get there. But I wanted to get this working.
I generally avoid back bevels as I know from my experience they are very quick to put on, and a real pain to dispense with later. I am not a fan of the ruler trick although I do see the point. On this one the fact it is now around 48 degrees is no real issue. I think 45 is only one version of 'standard'.
No shellac or ny kind of finish anywhere - I think wood planes are normally left unfinished but oiled (oil being a finish anyway I suppose). I tend to leave the sole but for the light oiling< a quick scribble with a candle if necessary but as Corneel says, usually the beech just glides over the work anyway.
Minor setback, was removing the irons - turn plane over, tap front on top of bench... and the top half of tote fell off. It must have done that with enthusiasm because I can't find it on the workshop floor. It'll turn up. It's time to put a knob on this and have it there for using.
 

condeesteso

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Good find Toby, just goes to show there really is nothing new, it's all been done before. I stopped on mine a while for a number of reasons. The tote broke, I think it needs a new enclosed one. And I have not decided on shape of front bun. The idea had been to try it with a knob of some sort as opposed to the trad woodie hold, but the actual shape hasn't come to me yet. The other reason is workshop is stuffed with 50 cu ft of SYP for some tables so breaking off to attend to the plane is not allowed (hammer)
Handplane - sorry should have replied re your points - it is normal I think to leave woodies unfinished although the usual wipe with linseed is really a finish anyway. I'd say with these cheap oldish woodies do what you like, try anything. I wouldn't say that of the older really good ones (Jim's Ottie/Buck for example). For the sole I'd just use a wipe of thinned boiled linseed (I keep a jar of BLO thinned about 70/30 with turps, can use white spirit but turps smells nicer). One thing I like about woodies is they slip over the stock very nicely - I don't think steel really likes sliding over wood, bronze better, beech best. Just my very H.O. of course.
 

tobytools

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I thought you would like seeing it.
Why I have a similar project in doing slowly (another woodie upgrade ect) I will get a better iron ect with inserted throat piece but I also want to give it a norris A1 front bun. How cool would that look. Ad so lac to it, the tote and wedge :)
I could go allday
TT
 

condeesteso

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an update is due I feel :lol: Only been a couple of years, what's the problem?

So, a cheap late woodie jack. The aim: to change the ergonomics to see how it may feel and handle. To make myself a decent scrub, or maybe not...

Front and back were dropped, add a new rear handle/tote (walnut, lying around) and a new front knob that held well but also allowed striking. The box insert was a complete derailment from the brief to make a scrub.

I am delighted with its capability. At the moment it's really set up more like a smoother as I couldn't resist seeing what it may be capable of. It cleaned a beech board really well in no time:
jack1.jpg


Here's a reminder of the box insert, the mouth is fairly tight but not silly.

jack3.jpg


Yes, the shape is odd, but it handles very well and I don't like the traditional hold on big woodies when I am working big or long boards. For me the front knob is great. That knob just happens to be holm oak by the way
jack2.jpg


I need to have a think about what next - I want a jack-size scrub (still!) - maybe not this one #-o
I'm reminded again just how excellent these super-cheap planes can be - the irons alone are way better than most new these days. Still a woodie fan I am.

p.s. the very long delay was caused partly by dropping the plane, breaking the handle and losing the bit under the bench. The lost bit turned up recently so I decided to finish it.
 

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