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Waka

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Thought I'd start a new thread with some more questions on Broadband.

My previous thread said that I have elected to go with Zen. The more I read about all this the more confused i get, it is only Zen that mentions the need for a Modem/Router as an extra purchase.

What do these bits of kit do?

Wouldn't the modem I have with my computer suffice or will this not supply breodband?

If I have to purchase, what do you recommend?

And when purchased where does it go?

Sorry to be a bore on this, but you must have gathered by now that I'm not very knowledgable when it comes to the inside of the box.
 

Terry Smart

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Hi Waka

As I understand it...

The modem on your computer is probably just for use with a phone like (usually a 56k one); you can still attach this to your phone line to send faxes.

For broadband you will need a different modem, which connects the incoming cable to your computer and makes sense of it. This usually connects either via USB or an ethernet connection. Most suppliers include a modem in the package as far as I understand.

A router is what you use to send the broadband signal to other computers; more often than not these are wireless but it doesn't have to be so.
I'm using a Linksys router which does everything I want it to.

I'm sure others will add more, but I hope this sheds some light!
 

cambournepete

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A dial up modem won't do broadband.

The modem turns the wiggly waveforms that go up and down the ADSL/cable wire into the 1's and 0' your pc will understand.

If you have just 1 PC you want to access the web you don't need a router - you can just connect the modem into your PC using a LAN cable.

If you have more and want them to access the web you need the router to route the bits from the modem to the right PC. You might like to get a wireless router to avoid having cables everywhere.

I use NTL and have one of their cable modems wired into my Belkin wireless router. This in turn talks to my new desktop in the dining room, my wife's laptop and my work laptop all wirelessly. They can all access the web simultaneously. I can also copy files from one PC to another (having set up a windows network).

Make sure you get the right modem for your broadband connection (i.e. ADSL or cable). The make of router shouldn't make much odds really.

HTH,

Pete
 

sxlalan

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Hi Waka

Basically as the others have said. A modem connects your PC directly to the broadband world. It can either be internal (i.e. plug into a socket inside your PC) or external (ie a separate box that the telephone cable plugs in to and is then connected by another cable to your PC. With a modem the broadband connection effectively enters your PC directly, potentially exposing it to hacking etc unless you have appropriate protective software such as firewall installed.

A router is similar to a modem but a bit more sophisticated. It is a separate box (like an external modem) but unlike a modem it acts as an interface between the broadband world and your PC. Broadband connects to the router and the router then connects to your PC. Your PC effectively hides behind the router so that the outside world can't see it unless you want them to. This is quite a bit safer than having a simple modem.

The final advantage of a router is that it often includes a built in switch. This basically means that rather than having a single connection for 1 PC it will have several connections so that you can connect more than 1 PC to the internet. The additional machines don't even have to be PCs as such, they could be internet enabled webcams, playstation/xbox machines etc etc.

I would recommend a router 1) for security and 2) for extensibility.

Be aware that a router doesn't necessarily have a modem built into it though. The modem is needed for connectivity. Many broadband routers will have the modem built in so it is an all-in-one device. Others will just be a router without a modem. To use these you would have to have a stand-alone modem that plugged into the router which then connects to your PCs.

Cheers

Alan
 

Waka

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Pete":56wjx8l7 said:
The modem turns the wiggly waveforms that go up and down the ADSL/cable wire into the 1's and 0' your pc will understand.
Now I understand your talking binery

Thanks guys, I understand so much more than I did yesterday, makes me feel half intelligent.
 
A

Anonymous

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Waka

BT provide the modem free of charge which is a significant saving.

You only need a router if you want to connect several netwroked PCs to the modem

BT will provide a free router/modem if you sign up for one of their higher speed deals

Broadband modem is not the same as dial-up
 

gav

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One of the advantages of a router over a modem is that if you buy one with a builtin firewall you get an extra level of protection over a modem directly connected to the computer. Every little bit helps in these days on the internet.

If you buy one with wireless don't forget to configure it even if you don't use it. In my street there are 2 "free" adsl wireless services available I can get on and "use".

Gav
 

Argee

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I use a DrayTek Vigor 2600 Router. I connect this to my PC via the Ethernet (network) cable socket - most PCs have these built in nowadays, otherwise you'll need a cheap Ethernet card. This setup allows my wife's computer to access the Internet at the same time as me, or separately, as there's no need to have my machine running as with Internet sharing connections.

I can transfer files to and from my wife's machine, use it for back-up, etc. I'm planning on running another machine elsewhere and all this will need to have Internet access is a length of Category 5 cable. I've shied away from wireless initally due to cost and possibility of "hotspot" use, although I guess that neither of these concerns is viable nowadays.

The main advantage of running behind a router is if it's a Network Address Translator (NAT) router. This assigns IP addresses dynamically, which means that you appear to be accessing the Internet from a different machine each time. An article here explains it quite well.

Finally, a firewall might be a good idea. I'd recommend Agnitum's Outpost Free Edition to get you started.

Another useful resource is to visit http://grc.com and scroll down until you find "Shields Up" - test your visibility to others when connected. What you're looking to achieve is a "Total Stealth" situation, which effectively means that as far as scanners and other hackers are concerned, you don't exist. HTH

Ray.
 

Charley

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In the house where the line comes in we've got a Netgear DG834G which is a modem, router, WAP (wireless access point) and firewall all in one. link...

Another good, free software firewall is ZoneAlarm...
 

OLD

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When you get broadband you have audio and digital info on the same wires so every telephone outlet (lju) has to be fitted with a filter it has two outputs phone and data this separates the infomation .You will need to purchase these as well.
Modem is fine for most but if you have or could have more than one computer it has to be a modem/router the wireless system is used to connect the other computers to the router rather than running wires both types of router are available though.
 

Shady

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Waka - lots of good advice here. If I might attempt to summarise/offer some thoughts:

1. Broadband modems and dial-up modems are different beasts, and the one will not be usable for the other 'supply'.

2. Remember, with broadband you can elect to be permanently on-line. This means no dialling wait, or faffing around - but, it also significantly increases your exposure to all the nasty stuff trying to get at you. So, I'd advise a hardware firewall - most routers will have this built in.

3. Be aware when buying - many routers do not have modem capability (not sure, but that D-link you link to does not specifically mention a modem in the sales blurb I saw, so I'd suspect it doesn't include one). You need to clarify this point. There are often returns at places like PC world because of this.

4. Netgear and D-link both do combined Router/modem boxes that include firewalls, and have wireless capability as well as wired - all for about £60 to £100, depending on the bells and whistles level. I'd recommend one of these. You can hook up your main computer, wirelessly use a laptop, add and move computers as necessary. Also note that it avoids the potential poo trap of being seen by your provider to have more than one machine on the connection (for which they may want more dosh..) As discussed above, a router 'hides' everything on your side of it - the external world just sees that one box on-line.

(Oh, and micro-filters may or may not be necessary - try and see...)
 

sxlalan

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Just to clarify, when looking at D-Link kit, all items that start with the code DSL include a modem. The following is from the D-Link site

DSL-xxxx Products include a built in ADSL modem - no other modem is required.
DI-xxxx Products do not include an ADSL modem and are intended for use with Cable Modems.
so the products above should both include built-in modems.

Cheers

Alan
 
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