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Mitre saw choice for speaker building

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simonms

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Hi there folks,

Just joined up as i am building a pair of very big Tannoy Westminster speakers and they have a lot of finishing trim and want to have these areas perfect.

I am using Festool saws and routers for much of the internal work and was about to buy the Kapex 120 but maybe thats overkill when i will be working with smallish mouldings (hardwood) but i do have the extractor so that would be a plus.

I need a picture framers/cabinet makers finish on 22.5 and 45 degree straight cuts-i have trawled the internet for advice on this but got no where really. Any advice would be very welcome as i need to purchase something for the job asap.

Many Thanks Si
 

simonms

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Thanks for the reply, yes i have but at that price point the Festool would be my choice purely on compatibility with the extractor.

My thoughts were would a cheaper saw with less capacity give me just a clean and accurate a cut as the Festool as i don't really need all the features that these big saws provide-it will be used only for the prep of hardwood mouldings but i need them to be seemless.

Is the Bosch a competitor for the Kapex? I heard there were a few probs with it when it first hit the market.
 

RogerP

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I need a picture framers/cabinet makers finish on 22.5 and 45 degree straight cuts-
A cabinet maker would probably cut the mitres by hand and then use a shooting board to finish. I have found that's the best and quickest way to get perfect mitres. Professional picture framers often use a guillotine for the final slice.
 

CHJ

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RogerP":12tj358k said:
Professional picture framers often use a guillotine for the final slice.
I was just about to suggest the same as being far more cost effective.
<<<< Linky Pic.
 

CHJ

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Why a mitre saw, any fine toothed tenon saw would do, cut off angle does not need to be very accurate.

Main accuracy required with any framing or beading is the length of the finished pieces, so as long as you trim back any over-length to accurately marked lengths you should be fine.
I've seen one of these being used to trim off 75mm square section end-grain in Beech and it left a very good finish.
If you get breakout on the back edge use a piece of sacrificial backing wood for support as the blade exits.
 

simonms

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On second look i need to be able to finish most of the cuts at 22.5 not sure whether some of these suggestions would suit that-maybe an electric mitre saw with a fine tooth blade would be more suitable.

recommendations for accurate mitre saws for this task below £500.

Cheers Si
 

CHJ

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You can lock the fences at any intermediate angle, admittedly you will need to confirm the exact setting in the first instance and mark the datums but you are more than likely to have to check and fettle any powered mitre saw accordingly if you need absolute accuracy, a powered mitre saw has far more variables of blade angle that can influence accuracy.
 

bugbear

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Nobex Champion?

Actually, for moulding, you don't even need the champion - that's more for skirting board, given it's high capacity.

The Nobex Proman would serve just fine for this.

BugBear
 

Stormer1940

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I was going to suggest a shooting board or guillotine as well... Very clean cut with a good guillotine. I have cut hundreds of mitres with this method...
 

RogerP

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All you need is first to make one of these shooting boards, plus a crosscut saw and a plane. Set the shooting board up correctly use a sharp plane and you'll make perfect mitres.
 

RogerP

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bugbear":w48gl9iv said:
http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue49/tannoy.htm

Big project.

BugBear
Pricing: $35,000 USD .... who is kidding whom :roll:
 

simonms

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...the oak trim was cut with a £250 Bosch which was good but would prefer a tighter join.

Best Si
 

Mike Wingate

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I use either a Nobex, guillotine and a shooting board to get good results. The shooting board has really improved lots of workshop tasks, no longer tasks, more someting to look forward too.
 

samthedog

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simonms":3mk8gzef said:
On second look i need to be able to finish most of the cuts at 22.5 not sure whether some of these suggestions would suit that-maybe an electric mitre saw with a fine tooth blade would be more suitable.

recommendations for accurate mitre saws for this task below £500.

Cheers Si
I have done a great deal of finish work on kitchens and also mouldings in renovation projects. I have used the makita LS7014. It uses 7 1/2 inch blades and cuts smooth as glass with a 60 - 72 tooth blade. It also has quite good dust collection and with a shop vac it's superb. It's small and takes up little space and the motor will be plenty strong enough for MDF.

Paul.
 

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