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Mitre gauge or sliding table

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Jamied

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I have a sedgewick ta315 table saw that I love! I fancied having a incra mitre gauge to use on it with a finger joint jig.
But then i realised I don't have a mitre slot on the saw cast iron top! Disaster!
I have a sliding table with the saw that I never use (tracksaw and chopsaw instead).
Will my sliding table fence work in the same way as a mitre gauge?
 

Lonsdale73

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Since none of the more knowledgeable sources have replied here are my thoughts.

1) Check out youtube for finger joint jigs, you'll maybe find one there you can adapt to suit your saw.

2) Incra offer a finger joint jig called the iBox and there are several videos of this on youtube including one from Incra whose guy makes it look an absolute breeze to use. I had one which I used on a router table rather than a table saw. My first attempt worked great but I struggled for consistency thereafter although that has far more to do with my own limited experience and ability and shortcomings with the stock I was using. It still required a mitre slot though.

3) I'm not familiar with your machine so guessing the 315 relates to a blade diameter and wondering if would be feasible to make a false top that sits over the mitre-less cast iron one, into which you could fit a length of mitre track?
 

Trainee neophyte

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I haven't replied because I don't have a sliding table (looking to get one), but isn't a sliding table basically a very big, more accurate miter guage? Am I missing something here? Looking at a picture of your table (https://www.axminster.co.uk/sedgwick-ta ... ch-ax21217) there is a big fat fence to clamp the jig to - the only issue being that it is only to the left of the blade. Most of the jigs I have seen sit on the table and straddle the blade - I don't see why it wouldn't work using the sliding table instead of slots, but you would know best how accurate and immobile the sliding table is.

Found a Sawstop video of exactly that: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DWt_y397ZFY

Does this help? I'm not an expert here!
 

Jamied

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Thank you for the replies, very much appreciated,
Im Going to make a disposable prototype finger box jig to clamp to my existing sliding fence, if it seems ok and the principal works, I can then purchase the inbox from incra for long term use.
Thank you for the advice.
 

Trainee neophyte

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Jamied":2kdbob5u said:
Thank you for the replies, very much appreciated,
Im Going to make a disposable prototype finger box jig to clamp to my existing sliding fence, if it seems ok and the principal works, I can then purchase the inbox from incra for long term use.
Thank you for the advice.
Would love to hear how you get on. Photos or it never happened :D
 

Doug71

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Trainee neophyte":2dpw35sg said:
I haven't replied because I don't have a sliding table (looking to get one), but isn't a sliding table basically a very big, more accurate miter guage? Am I missing something here? Looking at a picture of your table (https://www.axminster.co.uk/sedgwick-ta ... ch-ax21217) there is a big fat fence to clamp the jig to - the only issue being that it is only to the left of the blade. Most of the jigs I have seen sit on the table and straddle the blade - I don't see why it wouldn't work using the sliding table instead of slots, but you would know best how accurate and immobile the sliding table is.

Found a Sawstop video of exactly that: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DWt_y397ZFY

Does this help? I'm not an expert here!
I was at my local woodworking machinery supplier a few weeks ago and they had a nice used Sedgwick ta315 with sliding table that I was looking at. They said they had taken it from a customer in part exchange towards a new Sedgwick ta315 with sliding table. The new model has 2 mitre slots, 1 either side of the blade, the customers old one only had 1 mitre slot to the left of the blade. He said he wanted 2 mitre slots so he could use a crosscut sled, I got the impression they thought he had been watching too many American youtube videos as the sliding table would do all he needed.
 

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Good to hear - I don't have either a mitre guage or sliding table at the moment, and the sliding table is only £30 more than a good mitre guage, so it seems sensible to get the table. Just need to rummage down the back of the sofa for the cash.
 

MusicMan

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Two mitre slots engaged with runners is actually one runner and three runner edges too many!

The ideal precision engineering way to do a slide is one very accurately machined straight edge, with the sliding jig referenced to it. You just need a force pressing the jig against the edge. I like the runners with one straight edge and one adjustable side (such as expandable plastic pieces) that ensure the straight edges are pressed in contact.

When you have two slots and two runners, even though the motion can feel smooth, it is actually not well defined. The runners will be deforming slightly to conform to the best local fit. You will get some average of the four sides of the slots. If the runners are badly machined, this could be an advantage, but it is best to have one edge that you ensure is straight, and make the sled follow that.
 
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