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Milk Paint

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Scrit

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I wondered if anyone knows of a supplier in the UK who does milk paint or an acceptable substitute? I've had stuff in the past from the USA, but that seems environmentally insensitive if there's a British or European manufacturer.

Scrit
 

mr

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I've been searhing high and low of late for a UK supplier of Milk Paint. There doesnt appear to be one. Farrow and Ball have the colours but not the texture, but then you can mix the colour yourself pretty much in Homebase. A google for Cassein paint turns up a few options but nothing really spot on IMHO. I'm now looking at either buying some from the states from http://www.milkpaint.com/ or having a go at making some.
Cheers Mike
 

Philly

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Here you go!
General Finishes - haven't tried them myself but saw them at Ally Pally (I think)
Hope this helps
Philly :D
 

Scrit

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Thanks Philly

I'll give them a try. Got to have the right finish for a Shaker box

Scrit
 

Woody Alan

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Classichandtools are now stocking General finishes products, if that's of any help.

Alan
 

Shrubby

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Hello Scrit
If your still looking for milk paint, Pelikan Plaka craft paints are casein based - recommended to me by a french furniture shop in london. If the colours don't appeal then Schminke do a casein medium for artists to which you could add your own pigments. Cornelissen stock both and Greatart have a colour chart for Plaka. Failing this a general trawl for Casein paint should yield something.
regards Shrubby
 

engineer one

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hi scrit what about talking to english heritage library since they will almost certainly list those makers. as i understand it in many grade 1 and 2 listed buildings milk paint is the only way to go.

actually i also remember vaguely seeing a programme where someone was actually making their own milk paint.

maybe the other thing is to check with the bigger restorers, what about manchester museums as a source for info???

paul :wink:
paul
 

Scrit

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In the end some research turned up the following formula from the 1870s, which appears to work:

Milk Paint Formula

1 litre skimmed milk (at room temperature)
30 gm hydrated lime (by weight)
500 to 1200 gm of chalk may also be added as a filler

Stir in enough skimmed milk to hydrated lime to make a mixture with a creamy constituency. Add the balance of skimmed milk and stir well. Then add powder pigment(s) to desired colour and consistency (the pigment powder must be lime-proof). Stir in well for a few minutes before using. For best results continue to stir throughout use.

Apply milk paint with a cheap natural bristle brush. The wall/furniture needs to dry before applying the next coat. Excess paint may be kept for several days in the fridge until the milk sours. Any surface painted with milk paint should be allowed to dry thoroughly for 3-4 hours before use. For extra protection, a coat of linseed or stand oil can be applied to the finish once it has dried.

Note: the colour of the paint may change slightly depending on the colour/porousity of the object being painted, so test in an inconspicuous area first before applying to a large area.

Milk paint is extremely durable (much better than modern alkyd paints) and will resist many commercial paint strippers.

Scrit
 

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