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MFT Length stop

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Steve Maskery

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There are occasions when I want to cut of multiple lengths of board on my MFT. I have a couple of ways of making this easy and accurate, and this is my latest.

It is an adjustable length stop which fits into two holes of my MFT, and consists of a pegged base over which slides an adjustable foot.

22 stop closeup.JPG


The holes of an MFT are on 96mm centres. If it seems like a strange distance, it is because it is compatible with the 32mm system. So the two peg holes have to be drilled exactly 96mm apart. To do this I cut a spacer exactly 96mm long, put the workpiece up against a stop to drill the first hole, then inserted the spacer to drill the second hole, ensuring that they are exactly the correct distance apart.

01 first hole.JPG


02 second hole.JPG


Then, over on the Router table, I routed a v-groove across the top of the base and along the centre of the top.

03 rout v-groove base.JPG


04 routed v-groove.JPG


05 rout v-groove top.JPG


Still on the router table, I used the Dropping On method to rout a pair of 1/4” grooves along the sliding top, taking just a few mm at a time, each cut being braced against the RH stop before being lowered onto the the cutter and pushed forward up to the end stop.

06 drop on setup.JPG


08 drop on start.JPG


10 drop on end.JPG


11 finished slots.JPG
 

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Steve Maskery

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A square key set diamond-wise aligns the two parts, and this is probably the hardest part to do. If it is too fat the two halves will wobble, and if it is too loose the two parts will wrack. It needs to be a Goldilocks fit, not too small, not too big, just right, and then the two parts will slide sweetly. I remove the arris of the key so that the two parts ride on the face of the key, not the corners.

13 key too big.JPG


With the two parts aligned I marked through the slots onto the base, to show me where the Bristol levers need to go. I have a special pencil to do this, it is thinned down so that it just fits in a 1/4” groove.

14 thin pencil.JPG


However, the holes for the Bristol levers have to be drilled from the underside, so the easiest way to transfer the positions is to drill a tiny hole, just 1.5mm, through from the top. This shows exactly where to drill.

15 location hole.JPG


With the base turned over, I drill a 10mm cavity for the nut (because an M6 nut requires a 10mm spanner), then drill right through at 6.5mm. I staggered the holes so that the two Bristol levers do not foul each other.

16 cavity hole.JPG


An M6 nut is then pulled into each cavity.

17 pulling nut.JPG


A foot is glued onto the business end of the top.

18 gluing foot.JPG


A shallow groove is routed on the underside of the base, in line with the peg holes, and a couple of pegs turned to fit. They are a snug fit in the base, but the part that fits into the MFT is only snug for the top 6mm or so, then it tapers to make insertion easy. But that last 6mm is snug, so the groove enables me to get a screwdriver in there to prise it all out if it gets a bit too tight.

19 finished.JPG


20 finished.JPG


In use, the workpiece and track are set up against their respective dogs, the workpiece aligned with the track and the stop moved up to the end of the workpiece. Now I can cut off as many pieces as I like and they will all be exactly the same length.

21 MFT setup.JPG


23 removal.JPG
 

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custard

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Nice jig and really useful.

Upon reflection it's so useful that it's surprising someone like UJK haven't marketed something similar.
 

powertools

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Without doubt that is a well made jig but how is it worth the effort of making it when an offcut clamped to the table would do the same job?
I expect that it is only a matter of time before UKJ will produce one.
 

Steve Maskery

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That's a fair enough question, I guess. But a clamp only works if you locate this near to an edge.
Anyway, I like making jigs :)
S
 

powertools

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That's a fair answer Steve and I also like to make jigs and have made several based on your ideas
 

powertools

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Just to add to my previous comment I was really impressed with your 3 pointed square that I can't remember what you called it but I have spent a lot of time trying to improve the pivot point and will post the results when finished but without your input I would not have known about it.
 

Steve Maskery

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Ah, yes, you mean the Square of Thales:

[youtube]0j2g0FtvkBE[/youtube]

If you have any improvements, I'm all ears.
 

woodbloke66

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custard":1rv3rewx said:
Nice jig and really useful.

Upon reflection it's so useful that it's surprising someone like UJK haven't marketed something similar.
Having seen this, they will do soon :lol: :lol: - Rob
 

custard

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Actually Rob it looks like someone's already manufacturing something. Looking through my bag of MFT bits I found this.

MFT-Bronze-Stop-01.jpg


MFT-Bronze-Stop-02.jpg


I can't remember where I bought it, but I think it's a US supplier. But I do know why I think Steve's is the better product, I don't trust any length stop that's secured with a single fastening, and with this one not only can it be bumped backwards it can also swivel out of alignment and throw the measurement out. Looks pretty, but its not inspired me with enough confidence to ever use it.
 

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Doug71

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custard":2jsyctxq said:
Actually Rob it looks like someone's already manufacturing something. Looking through my bag of MFT bits I found this.





I can't remember where I bought it, but I think it's a US supplier. But I do know why I think Steve's is the better product, I don't trust any length stop that's secured with a single fastening, and with this one not only can it be bumped backwards it can also swivel out of alignment and throw the measurement out. Looks pretty, but its not inspired me with enough confidence to ever use it.
You can get these a few places

https://benchdogs.co.uk/products/slide-stop-clamp

I have looked at them a few times as a length stop but for the reasons Custard said I have never got round to buying one. They are actually sold as a clamp but never really worked out if it is to clamp down on to something or push against something.
 

Nelsun

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^I was just looking at mine that's sat on a shelf just the other day. My last words to it were, "why did I buy this; you belong in the bin" for the exact same reasons as the above. The rounded end you'd butt stock up to makes it incredibly easy to knock out of place given the rounded dog going into the table at the other end. You can lock it down with a knob from underneath (steady!) but I never did trust it even with that in place.

The TSO ones just released sure do look purdy... but not £/$50 purdy.
 

sammy.se

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That's nice Steve.
I'm curious as to why you went with a 'diamond' shaped track, rather than a straightforward square/rectangle?

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

Steve Maskery

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It's actually easier to fit, Sammy. I use it on just about every sliding part I ever make and it just works. I think it's actually an engineering technique, I'm sure an engineer will be along any moment now... :)
S
 

powertools

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MVIMG_20190508_152603-1008x756.jpg


Steve there is no way that I would suggest that I have improved on your idea, there is no way of knowing because you have not gone into details of how you made it.
I was intreaged with the consept and decided to give it ago but struggled to make the pivot point accurate enough to make it worthwhile.
My solution after several attempts was to use furniture fixings from Screwfix and that has proved to be a good result.
 

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powertools

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Just to add, the nut in the photo is a nice snug fit in a 9mm hole drilled through both arms and with smooth sides that almost go through both arms it makes for a very smooth pivot that will cause minimal wear after a lot of use and of cause the bolt was cut to length to hold the arms tight and bottom out on the nut so it does not come loose.
 

Steve Maskery

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That is excellent, PT, thanks for posting. Mine is a brass nut and bolt. I've had no problems with wear, but, as you say, a sleeved pivot like that should outlast the wood that surrounds it!
Excellent.
S
 

Steve Maskery

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I've cobbled together, er, I mean carefully edited, the photos into a video/slide presentation.
[youtube]DSx-AA2FQrw[/youtube]
Enjoy.
 
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