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Metal powders

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deserter

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So recently I bought some metal powders and resin off the forum, and want to try them out. The thing is I'm not sure how to mix the powders in, the resin states equal parts resin to hardener but how much metal do I add?


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
 

woodyturner

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I don't think there is any rule except till it looks like liquid metal well that's all I do and it works a treat
 

tekno.mage

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When I've used metal powder with epoxy resins I've been surprised at how little of the metal powder you need. Having said that it's hard to advise on exact quantities as I've only made up enough to insert into a groove in the lids of some boxes.

My epoxy came in bottles with nozzle shaped lids and I squirted out about 25mm of compound from each bottle, then scooped up as much brass powder as would balance on the very end of an old teaspoon handle (about a 4mm cube of the stuff), sprinkled it over the epoxy then mixed it all together well. This worked for me - and my inset looked good and shiney when finished.

You need to add enough powder to get the nice metallic look, but not so much as to make the epoxy compound all dry and powdery when mixed, if you see what I mean :D

My partner advised against mixing the two parts of the epoxy together first, then mixing in the powder as he said over mixing of epoxy compounds can cause bubbles to form as it cures.
 

YewTube

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If you want good colour from a metallic powder you need to load as much as you can into the epoxy.
Pour out 1 part of the resin and gradually add the powder until it becomes very viscous and no more can be added. Mix in 1 part of the hardener and it will become fluid again. You are now ready to go.
This recipe works for me (stole it off a Jimmy Clewes DVD).
If I want black filler I use toner from an old printer cartridge (HSE WARNING, "Don't sniff it, eat it or smear it all over yourself.") Less than half the above amount will give a deep black.

Bill
 

jasonB

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Tiranti's suggest equal parts by volume of resin and powder which is much the same as Bill says above - as much as you can mix in.

J
 

János

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Hello,

Epoxies can take up large quantities of fillers: "liquid metals" are no more than metal filled epoxies. A two parts filler to one part resin blend is about the practical maximum. Always use a slow set epoxy, like Araldite Standard, so the air bubbles had enough time left to come to the surface.

Have a nice day,

János
 

OldWood

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Hi - Clicked on this thread as I have some fruit wood (almond) part turned blanks that have cracked and the only recovery action is to fill the crack(s). Designer firewood is an option but I would like to try filling first.

As they are cracks rather than deliberate recesses, would I be best to Dremel them out to give a clean edge (I'm dealing with a 1mm + line here), and on a wood that has some of the orange characteristic of yew, should I be thinking about colour or metal fill?

Thanks
Rob
 

jasonB

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I would just leave them as natural cracks, any Dremel work wil make them look unnatural
 

deserter

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I agree leave them natural, then I would use metals to emphasise them and make a feature. My opinion is that you can rarely hide a fault in timber without it standing out.


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
 

OldWood

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Thanks guys - the bowls are only rough turned at the moment so will need to dry out completely and be turned to a finish, so this was more a case of seeing what was possible in the long term.

Rob
 
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