Quantcast

MDF Wall Paneling

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
I have been given some 25mm sheets of MDF by a friend who was going to turn it into wainscoting, and my question is would this be any good for paneling the walls of my workshop?
Also if i used mdf type screws would it hold wall cupboard or should i screw into the battens behind it?

Working in a cabinet makers workshop i am used to working with hardwoods and the equivalent veneered ply and so i have no experience with the strenght qualities of mdf.

Many thanks

Woody
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
2
Location
SE London - NW Kent
25mm MDF is as heavy as hell and unless you are a masochist or plan to thin it a lot, see no merit in using it for panelling.

Woody - as I asked before, it would really assist answering your queries if you could give us sonme idea of the size of your shop and the nature of its construction too, for this kind of question. The first thing that springs to mind in trying to respond to you is "Why does he need panelling at all?
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
Woody the main concern I have about MDF in a workshop is that it has no resistance to moisture, why not sell or swap the MDF then if you want to panel the walls use t&g chipboard. As Chris said 25mm MDF weighs more than Hades. Topical Olympic reference :wink:

Keith
 

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
Chris wrote:
25mm MDF is as heavy as hell and unless you are a masochist or plan to thin it a lot, see no merit in using it for panelling.
Well i am certainly not a masochist but SWMBO has been called one for putting up with me.

Chris wrote:
Woody as i asked before, it would really assist answering your queries if you could give us some idea of the size of your shop and the nature of its construction too, for this kind of question. The first thing that springs to mind in trying to respond to you is "Why does he need panelling at all?
Your request for the size of my shop obviously slipped my mind. Its 50ftx40ft, and its made from some sort of local stone, like but not Bath stone.
"Why do i need panelling at all?" Because i want it! Because i need it! Because it was for free! But most of all because i want to put DPM and insulation behind it. I also want to run the electrical wiring, phone line, alarm and cctv camera wiring and hot and cold water piping behind it.
The stone walls are also uneven and it would be a lot of trouble fixing both cabinets and shelving onto it.

KeithS wrote:
Woody the main concern i have about MDF in a workshop is that it has no resistance to moisture, why not sell or swap the MDF then if you want to panel the walls use t&g chipboard.
The panelling will be painted, so wouldn't the MDF be protected by this and the dpm?

I know that the MDF is heavy because i had to unload it when he dropped it off.
As i said i was given the MDF for nothing, so if we put aside the weight and the problem putting it up, would there be any other reason for not using it? How would it compare to ply of chipboard? Would it hold some cabinets?
I don't really want to go through the hassel of swopping or selling it.

Many thanks

Woody
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
Woody I still think that you would be better with t&g but you seem hell bent on using it :) .

I personally wouldn't use it, but it will take screws and hold cabinets so it's your choice.

Keith
 

Bean

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2004
Messages
1,518
Reaction score
0
Location
scouting about
woody when you use the mdf for pannelling make sure the board edges are protected from the damp, they are like sponges. Sorry if i'm teaching you to suck eggs


Bean
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Woody

WHilst I can see that you would want to use this windfallo, I have to agree with what has been said before. I would consider storing the MDF for future projects and use particle board of some sort or ply which is lighter and easily sealed.
MDF is not particularly suited to the application you have in mind.
 

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
As i have stated the cabinet makers i work for does not use MDF and so i am not really clued up on this material.
Add to this my request for you views on the subject, and i find myself asking who am i to disregard your advice. So it seems the best thing that i can do is to use another material.

It wasn't the case of ignoring what Keith and Chris had to say, it was more a misunderstanding. I thought that the 2 of you were more concerned with the fact that it was too heavy or a pain in the backside to install and that if it wasn't protected it would become damp. Hence the reason for asking if dpm and paint would protect it.

Thanks to the four of you it seems that i have been saved from a lot of trouble.

Bean don't be sorry mate. None of us are to old or experience to learn something new, and it is thanks to forums such as this that people like me can learn something new everyday.

Now todays leason will be "What is the perfect board to use for panelling?"

Many thanks

Woody
 

StevieB

Established Member
Joined
29 Apr 2003
Messages
1,705
Reaction score
30
Location
Chatteris, Cambridgeshire
Best board is somewhat subjective. Some people recommend OSB, others have used plasterboard, still others t+G chipboard and some people love ply.

Personally I have used OSB, and hung French cleats on that for hanging cabinets. This was for cost reasons as OSB was cheaper than Ply. Wouldnt recommend plasterboard for the same damp reasons as MDF, it also lacks strength for hanging stuff from.

If your shop is 40ft x 50ft (Thats an aircraft hanger, not a workshop!) have you thought of surface mounting your cables in conduit? If you ever need to get at it thats a big area to strip off to play hunt the cable, also stops you forgetting exactly where they run and putting a screw through a cable at a later date (DAMHIKT :oops: )

Steve
---------
Feeling cramped in his 10ft by 10ft shed, but at least not having to share it with a car or the lawnmower
 

ike

Established Member
Joined
24 May 2004
Messages
1,681
Reaction score
0
Hell...ooooo everyone, it's FREE! Why not use it even if it's not the 'perfect' material?. The man should feel proud of his scavenging qualities - I'm not ashamed to admit I've rummaged in skips before. It's staggers me what people discard. My workshop is better than 50% recycled material and I not blowing my trumpet or anything, it's as good as anything built with all virgin material. One coat of polyurethane varnish will seal the MDF nicely not forgetting all the edges too, plus a vapour barrier is a must for dry lining. So what if it's heavy - doesn't matter when it's on the wall.

Ike
 

Offcut

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2004
Messages
98
Reaction score
0
Location
Aberdeen, Scotland
I would paint it to protect it and build a good structure to hold it up. If you have any problems later on with damp etc ( which you shouldn't) you can unscrew it and replace is with osb later - It's free give it a go.

Mdf at 25mm thick will have a good strength for hanging things - even if you have no confidence you could also apply horizontal battens and then screw into the batten.

Andy


And if you don't use it send it up to Scotland and I'll send you a few photo's of it on the wall... :D :D
 

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
Chris, as you can see i have given the size of the workshop and the reason i want to panel the walls.

Your input would be appreciated.

Cheers

Woody
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
2
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Woody,

When I first asked about the size of your shop, it was apropos your questions on machinery. With such a magnificent space available, you can plainly go for any machinery that takes your fancy and it will fit. Personally, I would go for second hand industrial kit for most stuff as the mass, quality and accuracy (if it has been reasonably maintained) are generally a lot better on old iron and a lot of stuff is available at good prices.

With regard to the panelling and workshop size, I had in mind the need for fairly substantial battening if you were to use the 25mm MDF and the consequent substantial standoff from the walls which in a small workshop would represent a significant loss of valuable space. With the space you have, that is not an issue.

Others have pointed to the potential problems with damp and its effects on MDF but provided a suitable membrane or other protection against damp is installed, this too should not be an issue.

In short there is no reason in my mind not to use it - especially from space considerations - other than the weight.

It will be strong enough to hang cabinets but I would spread the load with cleat as someone suggested and avoid load bearing screws closer than about an inch to any edge. Predrill a full size clearance hole for screws used to mount the MDF.

I'd certainly paint it - not least to provide more light in the shop (assuming you paint it white inside) .

Cheers.
 

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
Thanks Chris. Yes, second hand machines is exactly what i have in mind. Most of the ones that i have looked at come with extra bits of kit which would have been optional parts when the machine was new.
Also the companies that run them have them serviced regally so they are in very good condition.

As you say the size of the machine doesn't really matter as i have plenty of room. It is a barn which was converted into a workshop by the owner who i bought the house off.

Yes i will be painting it white.

Thanks for your advise.

Woody
 

tx2man

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2004
Messages
391
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshunt, herts
40ft x 50ft envy, envy, envy...................................


ps: :idea: could i park my car in your barn? If yes ,i could make a table.

TX
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Just to mention that the latest edition of Fine Homebuilding (from Taunton Press, the publishers of Fine Woodworking) has a detailed article on installing quite fancy MDF-based wainscotting. The author naturally enough says that he's very happy to use this material for this purpose. The design (off the top of my head, without the mag in front of me) is mdf raised panels onto wall, then face-frame on top, then mouldings (sorry, "moldings") around face-frame/ panel boundary and along top edge. Looks great painted in the article's photos.

rgds

John Forbes
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
johnelliott":2abk9db5 said:
There's quite a lot of Johns on this forum already, but I'm easily the best looking
Oh, too many jokes to choose from. Pick your own... :lol:

Welcome to the forum, John F. :D

Anyone else noticed that the 'Murricans seem to have suddenly jumped on the MDF bandwagon, just as we're all leaving it in droves? Or am I just imagining it?

Cheers, Alf
 

Shadowfax

Established Member
Joined
1 Nov 2003
Messages
659
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Alf
No, you are not imagining it. They are getting to know it but I can't see it taking off too well over there because they have so much timber at sensible prices. It must be the novelty value! Nothing wrong with MDF.......as long as you don't confuse it with wood, as in timber....with grain......and character.....and knots......and figuring....and character.......and well - wood, really!!

SF
 

Latest posts

Top